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    hi,
    up until a little over a year ago i thought i wanted to study english lit at uni, and had no idea what i wanted to do after. i even applied for uni and now have a place. now im seriously considering looking to do something else, and as long as it is the right subject for me then i think i will work as hard as necessary and take as much time as i need. my problems are as such:

    1) over A level the only sciencey sort of subject i took was maths - i unfortunately didnt take further maths because beforehand i had had a long love hate relationship with the subject and was petrified because everyone makes out like maths is the devil. yet, over the past two years, i just loved it. i looked forward to each lesson, and consistently got higher marks in it than any other subject i took. i kept telling myself that i wasnt good at it, and that i should drop it after AS even though it was my best subject by far, just because i had this ingrained fear by people telling me how scary and hard it was. i even dropped it and took history for a week, but just couldnt bear it and had to change back. best decision i ever made. yeah it was challenging, but once i got my head round the concepts i found it kind of... easy? it sounds wrong saying that, but i revised maths during study leave to take a break from mind numbing english and classics revision. i ended up getting an A*, and had a pretty good time doing it.
    yet, i still feel weird about trying to pursue it. i cant really think of ways to use maths outside of school in free time like personal statements generally require. and i dont have further maths! it doesnt sound like enough. shouldnt i be like, living and breathing it? thats what people always said with english, and i kind of got it because its such an emotional subject. i kind of feel like a cheat, because i found the A level comparatively easy and havent really done much else. im teaching myself code though, and i think its pretty cool, and i think i might be interested in computer science.
    would i be able to handle it? im trying to find somewhere to learn further maths independently, preferably for free but im finding nothing grr.

    2)
    this sounds stupid probably and ive never actually said this to anyone, but theres this weird sort of snootiness in me, a bit like that STEM snootiness of being all 'oh all subjects except stem are pointless blah blah blah' - like, ive just always really romanticised studying literature? i really want to be creative, and make something, and be all culturally astute or whatever. im scared that doing maths is the boring option, even though thus far ive enjoyed it. im scared ill never read another book or something. ive always kind of thought that one day i might become a writer, dont ask me why because i barely ever write anything. like i said, a lot of this is silly inner thoughts ive never voiced before. i guess i cant help but feel like id be letting go of that. i know its not like people with scientific backgrounds dont make anything amazingly creative but it still plays on my mind.

    thanks
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    (Original post by EmergencyBagels)
    ..
    All degrees are tough in their own respect. I personally don't see much point in paying 27k to study for a degree in English but that's just me I guess?

    As for Maths/Comp Sci. I can tell you out of experience as I applied to both. For a degree in Mathematics, depending on where you want to go, you will definitely need an A-Level in Further Maths. It is almost essential and a formal requirement at most of the good universities. For CS, an A-Level in Further Maths could boost your chances of getting an offer but not on the level that it would if you applied to Maths. As even at the best universities (Oxbridge, Imperial etc) Further Maths for CS isn't a formal requirement but 'preferred' .

    im teaching myself code though, and i think its pretty cool, and i think i might be interested in computer science.
    Coding (or programming) is only one part of a CS degree (the "practical" side). Again, depending on where you go, there will also be a lot of theory, which uses high-level Mathematics. If you want to do a CS degree because you like coding then you might be in for a surprise when you start the degree. I advise you to do some extensive research into the subject.
    Go on your potential university choices' websites and look at their modules, try find a specification or something. Look at what it consists of and do more research. If you like the sound of it, I would say go for it!

    A very transferable degree as it involves learning the fundamentals of technology and high-level Mathematics/problem solving. Something that in our day and age could put you in a good position come graduation, which will probably ~2020.

    Good luck
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    (Original post by edothero)
    All degrees are tough in their own respect. I personally don't see much point in paying 27k to study for a degree in English but that's just me I guess?

    As for Maths/Comp Sci. I can tell you out of experience as I applied to both. For a degree in Mathematics, depending on where you want to go, you will definitely need an A-Level in Further Maths. It is almost essential and a formal requirement at most of the good universities. For CS, an A-Level in Further Maths could boost your chances of getting an offer but not on the level that it would if you applied to Maths. As even at the best universities (Oxbridge, Imperial etc) Further Maths for CS isn't a formal requirement but 'preferred' .



    Coding (or programming) is only one part of a CS degree (the "practical" side). Again, depending on where you go, there will also be a lot of theory, which uses high-level Mathematics. If you want to do a CS degree because you like coding then you might be in for a surprise when you start the degree. I advise you to do some extensive research into the subject.
    Go on your potential university choices' websites and look at their modules, try find a specification or something. Look at what it consists of and do more research. If you like the sound of it, I would say go for it!

    A very transferable degree as it involves learning the fundamentals of technology and high-level Mathematics/problem solving. Something that in our day and age could put you in a good position come graduation, which will probably ~2020.

    Good luck
    thanks for replying. i have actually done a fair amount of research on computer science. i actually just finished a 6 week coursera course on it and it certainly wasnt all code. i was fine will it though, and i think im fairly briefed.
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    (Original post by EmergencyBagels)
    hi,
    up until a little over a year ago i thought i wanted to study english lit at uni, and had no idea what i wanted to do after. i even applied for uni and now have a place. now im seriously considering looking to do something else, and as long as it is the right subject for me then i think i will work as hard as necessary and take as much time as i need. my problems are as such:
    I was in the exact same situation a year ago, but decided to repeat the year to take on Maths and Further Maths. I don't really regret it

    I'd advise buying a Further Maths book, using the likes of ExamSolutions, PatrickJMT and Khan Academy to self teach Further Maths.Its not a requirement to need an A-level in Further Maths to apply to a Maths degree at most uni (the only ones which states it are Warwick, UCL, KCL, Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial, Durham and Edinburgh) although it is beneficial. Maths requires lots of practice, and if you are willing to put the time and effort in doing so then you will do well t it

    (Original post by EmergencyBagels)

    2)
    this sounds stupid probably and ive never actually said this to anyone, but theres this weird sort of snootiness in me, a bit like that STEM snootiness of being all 'oh all subjects except stem are pointless blah blah blah' - like, ive just always really romanticised studying literature? i really want to be creative, and make something, and be all culturally astute or whatever. im scared that doing maths is the boring option, even though thus far ive enjoyed it. im scared ill never read another book or something. ive always kind of thought that one day i might become a writer, dont ask me why because i barely ever write anything. like i said, a lot of this is silly inner thoughts ive never voiced before. i guess i cant help but feel like id be letting go of that. i know its not like people with scientific backgrounds dont make anything amazingly creative but it still plays on my mind.

    thanks
    That is true, but don't worry about it as only a few will act like that. I too like English, Art (did it for years now) which many deem pointless, but that did not stop me from continuing doing them as a hobby and apply for a Maths degree

    I used to be worried about that too. A Maths degree is really flexible and at most unis (such as Cardiff and Glasgow) they allow you to take many optional modules from other department (including English), and is one of the reason I decided to go for Maths.
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    (Original post by kkboyk)
    I'd advise buying a Further Maths book, using the likes of ExamSolutions, PatrickJMT and Khan Academy to self teach Further Maths.Its not a requirement to need an A-level in Further Maths to apply to a Maths degree at most uni (the only ones which states it are Warwick, UCL, KCL, Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial, Durham and Edinburgh) although it is beneficial. Maths requires lots of practice, and if you are willing to put the time and effort in doing so then you will do well t it



    That is true, but don't worry about it as only a few will act like that. I too like English, Art (did it for years now) which many deem pointless, but that did not stop me from continuing doing them as a hobby and apply for a Maths degree

    I used to be worried about that too. A Maths degree is really flexible and at most unis (such as Cardiff and Glasgow) they allow you to take many optional modules from other department (including English), and is one of the reason I decided to go for Maths.
    when you say teach yourself FM, would you say then id have to apply for actually take my exam in it, i.e. another year out? since i guess just saying 'heyy universities! i dont have an a level in further maths but trust me, i know it!' doesnt sound very reliable.
    also, im on khan academy, but im not really sure how to find the right stuff?is there a tailored FM course? i havent seen one. im having a look at hegartymaths atm but im not sure where it would be ok for self teaching

    what are you doing/where are you out of interest, if you dont mind me asking?
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    (Original post by EmergencyBagels)
    when you say teach yourself FM, would you say then id have to apply for actually take my exam in it, i.e. another year out? since i guess just saying 'heyy universities! i dont have an a level in further maths but trust me, i know it!' doesnt sound very reliable.
    also, im on khan academy, but im not really sure how to find the right stuff?is there a tailored FM course? i havent seen one. im having a look at hegartymaths atm but im not sure where it would be ok for self teaching

    what are you doing/where are you out of interest, if you dont mind me asking?
    Just self-teach the content. You should read the A-level syllabus (or from ExamSolutions) and look at the topics you must learn, then search for it. Apart from the universities I mentioned, you are not at a disadvantaged from not doing Further Maths.

    Firmed Cardifff for Maths.
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    Kinda reminds me of myself, i too never ever studied any sciency thing except math :-p but i think a comp and math joint degree is the most valuable option out there because,
    -its the most flexible degree out there (you can butt in to nearly any company with that degree)
    -you can work at home and provide software solutions to clients far far away
    -programming broadens creativity (uni's dont require you to know programming before entering so we're safe there)
    -etc
    If u think youre good at math, u can try self studying further math, plenty of online resources. Also check out MITOpenCourseWare(gold mine of knowledge),it contains many courses related to what you'll study at uni if u do take math and compsci , so you can get a headtstart
    And maybe u could pursure writing as a part time hobby maybe?
    My personal opinion is an english degree isnt worth the money and time since i think of language as something we pick up, instead of being force-fed (oka maybe force fed was too harsh, but its just my opinion, no offence)
 
 
 
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