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17th Feb: Mental Health - do you talk about it? Watch

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    This week on Radio 1’s Surgery with Gemma and Dr Radha, we’re talking about Mental Health, and the importance of talking.

    Have you ever suffered with mental health issues? Did you tell anyone, or did you keep it to yourself? We want to hear about your experiences here!

    Please note: you can post anonymously in this forum
    • #1
    #1

    Hi there,

    I have not personally experienced what it is like to have a mental handicap however I have seen first hand what it does to you as one of my friends was recently diagnosed with Bipolar syndrome which he takes medication for however it makes him feel tired and loathsome. If he does not take his medication however he turns into a completely different person. It seems very taxing on him and I feel like I cannot do much for him as a friend. Nonetheless His medication does take him back the the same friend that I've know since year 6
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    yes ive suffered from them. i dont tell anyone as i dont feel i can open up to anyone only if they are my very close friends and even that is very rare. i feel embarrassed about it if i tell my family or people in general.
    • #2
    #2

    I'm suffering from mental health issues, told my mum and boyfriend. Boyfriend helps, he lets me talk about how i'm feeling, but mum hasnt told any of the rest of the family. Makes me feel like she's ashamed to have a daughter that has depression
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    The stigma is changing, that's undeniable. But I have a diagnosis of schizophrenia. That's a lot harder to post about on Facebook. 'Sometimes I hear voices and have considered getting a train and going to the MI5 building in London to tell them to stop following me' isn't quite the same sort of status as admitting to other mental health problems. So apart from my partner, I keep it to myself. Even then I don't want to worry him too much.

    My mother is wildly unhelpful when it comes to mental health. She over reacts and makes my life a nightmare.

    So the only real people I talk to about my worries is my mental health team, which is fine in itself, but I don't think it's healthy to have them as your closet contacts in time of a crisis.
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    Yes and no one wants to talk about it so I don't. The stigma only worsens the illness in my experience.
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    I talk reasonably openly about my battles with schizoaffective disorder (depressive type) with friends and nuclear family. Due to being South Asian and considering the huge stigma attached to having a mental health problem in this community, very few people within my extended family know about my mental health issues and it has to be kept that way, for the sake of other members of the family and the impact that the wider community knowing, would have on them.

    I am interested in a career in mental health advocacy and do hope that one day I will be able to talk about my mental health problems openly with everyone! In the meantime, I am working for a project called Mindkit, which is an initiative being trialled across five London boroughs atm: http://mindkit.org.uk/ . I am a Youth Wellbeing Trainer with them, delivering assemblies and workshops to young people in my borough, aged 14-25 :yes:

    If you have any questions for me, BBC Radio 1 , do feel free to ask
    • #3
    #3

    Talking about mental health is important but with the right people who will not only empathize but be able to provide help, whether medical or therapeutic. As a person who has undergone really taxing phases right in high school time with a diagnosis of Bipolar disorder which showed manic depressive tendencies at the onset, I can say, "not every one deserves to know"
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    I find it very difficult to talk about my mental health, unless it's in a structured environment with a professional.
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    Apart from when I was diagnosed by my GP, I haven't talked to anyone. My two best friends know as I talked to them before I was diagnosed but I don't talk to them about it. It's embarrassing and I don't want other people to know. No one seems to care anyway.
    • #4
    #4

    I don't talk about it. I feel like if I tell I will be judged.
    My mum said to me that speaking to a psychologist/psychiatrist would be better because they don't know you well, and their used to it - but I think something like that's even worse. Spilling your guts out to someone you've never met before.

    I'm pretty sure a lot of people who I'm around a lot (i.e. teachers, friends) know that something is wrong - they just don't know what.
    No one knows that something's actually wrong. No one knows how I actually feel - I'm too scared to tell anyone and that makes it worse because it makes me feel more anxious and more stressed and it works in a stupid cycle.

    I honestly wish so much that I could talk so easily about it.
    • #5
    #5

    (Original post by BBC Radio 1)
    This week on Radio 1’s Surgery with Gemma and Dr Radha, we’re talking about Mental Health, and the importance of talking.

    Have you ever suffered with mental health issues? Did you tell anyone, or did you keep it to yourself? We want to hear about your experiences here!

    Please note: you can post anonymously in this forum
    I had a lot of issues which originated from trying to keep up with my parent's expectations. My teachers were fine with me, even at a top private school, however my brother had got 6a*s just the year earlier. For me, pleasing my parents became my only goal in life. I worked too hard, completely burned out but I did ok at my GCSEs (1a*, 5 as, 3 bs). My parents were mad at me but I just had to handle it myself, I was quite depressed and so forth previously, but I decided to focus on sport.
    After I finishe dmy eams. I qualified for a world championship event in sailing, which I did ok in, but I managed to get two 3rds, so I was happy. I also then started freediving, which has helped me keep calm as that's what it is about.

    Both sports help me keep calm and get away from the stress in life which really helped me a lot.
    • #5
    #5

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I had a lot of issues which originated from trying to keep up with my parent's expectations. My teachers were fine with me, even at a top private school, however my brother had got 6a*s just the year earlier. For me, pleasing my parents became my only goal in life. I worked too hard, completely burned out but I did ok at my GCSEs (1a*, 5 as, 3 bs). My parents were mad at me but I just had to handle it myself, I was quite depressed and so forth previously, but I decided to focus on sport.
    After I finishe dmy eams. I qualified for a world championship event in sailing, which I did ok in, but I managed to get two 3rds, so I was happy. I also then started freediving, which has helped me keep calm as that's what it is about.

    Both sports help me keep calm and get away from the stress in life which really helped me a lot.
    Adding onto this, my parents have issues too. They aren't violent, but they shout and argue at least a few times a day, but they do like each other. It's more of a familly issue, as my dad works from 6am to 10pm and my mum goes to sleep at 2am because of work. I work untill about 10 then do Epq, but the whole familly is just overworked. This means that I have bad times, but I learnt myself how to get through them, and so have my parents. They wouldn't let me go to a psycologist as they see it as a load of nonsense.
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    I talk openly about both my panic disorder/agoraphobia and OCD. I found it easy to be open with PD as many people have experienced a panic attack in their life so they could relate, even if they only ever had one panic and not full blown panic disorder like I did but it took me a while to be vocal about OCD. I've had OCD since I was a child and got diagnosed young and didn't get diagnosed with PD until I was about 19 or 20. Only my family and partner knew about my OCD but I felt comfortable enough telling everyone about PD.

    There was too much misconceptions surrounding OCD and there still is and this was a big reason why I didn't speak at first because I couldn't be bothered repeating the same stuff over and over to correct people plus I was ashamed to have it. I later realized that being vocal and educating people was the only way I could show them the truth so I started talking about it and had a good response. My mum and partner are very clued up on the subject whereas my stepdad refuses to see it as a debilitating illness and thinks we all have a bit of it which is nonsense. Even if I can only educate one person on what OCD actually is and that's its a debilitating illness and not just a 'quirk' then I'll be happy. Talking about OCD also helped reduce some of the shame I feel about having it. I know I shouldn't be ashamed to have any illness, mental or physical and I would slap some sense into someone if they ever told me they were ashamed for having a condition they had no control over but when it happens to you, sometimes it can be hard to keep that mentality and to this day, I am still working through accepting that I have it and not being ashamed. For so long I denied I had it which was detrimental to my health and wellbeing just like anyone with a physical condition denying they have a problem isn't going to help them when their problem is so obvious!

    I've never really spoke about the depression I suffered from both PD and OCD as I've felt that it should already be known that if I you experience severe OCD and PD like I did, of course you're going to have some form of depression along with it.

    I feel like you can't win when it comes to talking about mental health. Talk about it openly and you get called an attention seeker and hide it and people say you add to the stigma. Never understood the whole attention seeking line because a lot of the attention you get when you disclose that you have a MH problem is that your weak and no one goes out seeking that kind of attention.

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    Yes - I didn't tell anyone for a while, and when I told who I thought was my best friend, our friendship ended soon after... Then my school made me see a counsellor, which I absolutely hated. From that, my parents found out...

    Now, I don't talk to anyone about it, and I just get on with things in my own ways! Whether they're beneficial or not, probably not, but I get by!
    • #6
    #6

    I suffer from depression and anxiety and I am currently on medication and seeing a therapist as well as a psychiatrist. My closest friends do know about this but my family does not.
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    I've posted about it before and been on Radio One and talked about my experiences of mental health at uni. I'd say I'm very open about my diagnosis and my experiences of living with my illness but I'm not very open at all about how things actually are right now for me (something I need to work on and am currently working on )
    • #7
    #7

    I have suffered from mental health issues and still suffering from it. I have told my GP and my best friend. I find it hard to even bother to actually even open up to anybody because I believe they are less likely to even understand so what is the point. Another thing is that I feel a lot worse after even opening up anyone. My own bestfriend does not understand how I feel, she probably thinks I'm lying or even attention seeking possibly. It is just terrible when you have no help. My GP does not want to put me on daily medication as I am still yet young. So, my GP put me onto a program called IAPT which is something like counselling and they give advice on how to maintain stress etc. But, that did not really help, it made me feel worse with sleepless nights and nightmares.
    • #8
    #8

    Yes, but generally in a scientific sense. I have Aspergers' Syndrome; often when I say that people think of Sheldon Cooper (The Big Bang Theory) or Sonya Cross (The Bridge). In reality, I - and every single person with any type of mental health condition - experiences it differently. Anxiety Disorders, Bipolar Disorder, Depression, and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder all manifest themselves in different ways in different people.

    One thing that I think really has to be recognised and talked about is that there is no definite list of symptoms that will all show if an individual has a condition. Despite having Aspergers' Syndrome, I have the ability to be empathic and understand emotions - I can 'read' people's faces. This - I feel - is crucial for Doctors, Nurses, Teachers, and the general public as a whole to understand: you can make assumptions and judgements if you find out about a condition of someone with whom you are interacting (that's essential with any person and we all do it), but you should not assume that these assumptions will necessarily hold true all of the time.
    • #9
    #9

    I've suffered for years with depression, and feel like it's ruined my ability to trust others as well as my last relationship. I don't tell anyone because I don't want to be a burden, Yet I always find time to care about others who struggle, just like everyone else deserves the help and not me.
 
 
 
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