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    So I know that obviously when you are talking about what you don't like, you would say "je n'aime pas.."

    1) I got told that you always have to put a "de" after the pas, making it "je n'aime pas de...". Does it always have to be "de"?

    2) following the above supposed "rule" that you need de after pas (if that even is a rule), would this be right: je n'aime pas de foot? Wouldn't it need to be "le foot" as it is referring to all football, not just ("de" some football?

    So basically, do you always need "de" after pas? If not, when do you need "de" and not something like "le"?

    3) When not using aimer, why do you not need "de" (if you even need it at all for aimer)? I know that this is correct as i got it checked by a teacher: "je ne m'entends pas bien avec ma mere", so why don't you need pas here but you do need it with aimer?

    Thanks

    EDIT: 4) Here is an example from my work: je n’ai pas de deuxieme prenom Why is it "de" and not "un", when "de" is not always used as you wouldnt say something like je n'aime pas le foot? Or would that be je naime pas de foot?
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    (Original post by blobbybill)
    So I know that obviously when you are talking about what you don't like, you would say "je n'aime pas.."

    1) I got told that you always have to put a "de" after the pas, making it "je n'aime pas de...". Does it always have to be "de"?

    2) following the above supposed "rule" that you need de after pas (if that even is a rule), would this be right: je n'aime pas de foot? Wouldn't it need to be "le foot" as it is referring to all football, not just ("de" some football?

    So basically, do you always need "de" after pas? If not, when do you need "de" and not something like "le"?

    3) When not using aimer, why do you not need "de" (if you even need it at all for aimer)? I know that this is correct as i got it checked by a teacher: "je ne m'entends pas bien avec ma mere", so why don't you need pas here but you do need it with aimer?

    Thanks
    I think we need FrenchUnicorn here...
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    So yeah, please explain to me when/why/whether or not you need de in which circumstances
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    (Original post by blobbybill)
    So I know that obviously when you are talking about what you don't like, you would say "je n'aime pas.."

    1) I got told that you always have to put a "de" after the pas, making it "je n'aime pas de...". Does it always have to be "de"?

    2) following the above supposed "rule" that you need de after pas (if that even is a rule), would this be right: je n'aime pas de foot? Wouldn't it need to be "le foot" as it is referring to all football, not just ("de" some football?

    So basically, do you always need "de" after pas? If not, when do you need "de" and not something like "le"?

    3) When not using aimer, why do you not need "de" (if you even need it at all for aimer)? I know that this is correct as i got it checked by a teacher: "je ne m'entends pas bien avec ma mere", so why don't you need pas here but you do need it with aimer?

    Thanks

    EDIT: 4) Here is an example from my work: je n’ai pas de deuxieme prenom Why is it "de" and not "un", when "de" is not always used as you wouldnt say something like je n'aime pas le foot? Or would that be je naime pas de foot?
    Actually you do not say "de" after "je n'aime pas" (who said such a thing :lol: )

    -> je n'aime pas LE foot , is correct

    "De" follows" after "je n'ai pas" but not always ! (Let's say often) *I'm sorry if my sentence is not english did you understand ?*

    You have to use "de" in these cases :
    - possession (le stylo DE Paul)
    - origine (le lait DE Normandie)
    - contenu (un verre DE lait)
    - matière (une statue DE bronze)
    - agent de la phrase (il est aimé DE ses élèves *aks yourself "il est aimé DE qui ?* )


    Understand ?
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    No you dont always de, can i ask who told you that?
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    (Original post by FrenchUnicorn)
    Actually you do not say "de" after "je n'aime pas" (who said such a thing :lol: )

    -> je n'aime pas LE foot , is correct

    "De" follows" after "je n'ai pas" but not always ! (Let's say often) *I'm sorry if my sentence is not english did you understand ?*

    You have to use "de" in these cases :
    - possession (le stylo DE Paul)
    - origine (le lait DE Normandie)
    - contenu (un verre DE lait)
    - matière (une statue DE bronze)
    - agent de la phrase (il est aimé DE ses élèves *aks yourself "il est aimé DE qui ?* )


    Understand ?
    Get it, I think! I just read this article which helped me too: http://forum.wordreference.com/threa...iture.1381729/

    So basically, its used to say "of" in english basically? One of your examples was: a statue of bronze, ie a bronze statue/statue made of bronze

    Or when un/une/des is used as a negative, it turns to "de", ie je n'ai pas de statue. This is for "avoir" verbs though, not "etre". Right?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by blobbybill)
    Get it, I think! I just read this article which helped me too: http://forum.wordreference.com/threa...iture.1381729/

    So basically, its used to say "of" in english basically? One of your examples was: a statue of bronze, ie a bronze statue/statue made of bronze

    Or when un/une/des is used as a negative, it turns to "de", ie je n'ai pas de statue. This is for "avoir" verbs though, not "etre". Right?

    Thanks
    You totally get it

    Yes only for "avoir" ^^

    About "of" , that's kinda true but careful -> milk FROM Normandie ; Paul's pen ; he's loved BY his students
    I mean, you're totally right but when you have an "of" in english, it often turns "de" but a "de" in french is not an "of" all the time. Get it ?
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    (Original post by FrenchUnicorn)
    You totally get it

    Yes only for "avoir" ^^

    About "of" , that's kinda true but careful -> milk FROM Normandie ; Paul's pen ; he's loved BY his students
    I mean, you're totally right but when you have an "of" in english, it often turns "de" but a "de" in french is not an "of" all the time. Get it ?
    Yep! Thanks once again
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    I corrected it , except accents that's a really good french !!

    Edit : voilà :3
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    (Original post by blobbybill)
    Thanks! I'll look through your quoted message to see the corrections (i saved it). Please could you delete your previous reply to me (with my paragraphs quoted though incase anyone steals my work and uses it?

    And what else could I add to make it a bit better? please could you message me what i could add after you delete your reply with my quoted paragraphs?
    Thanks

    EDIT: I have already screenshotted your reply so I can see all of the corrections when you delete the post
    YW :3

    You can PM me if you want , but honestly I think you have nothing to add that's really great !! I think you can get an A* :3 , at least I hope for you
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    (Original post by FrenchUnicorn)
    YW :3

    You can PM me if you want , but honestly I think you have nothing to add that's really great !! I think you can get an A* :3 , at least I hope for you
    Wow thanks, its for my controlled assessment so I hope i can get a good grade!
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    (Original post by blobbybill)
    Wow thanks, its for my controlled assessment so I hope i can get a good grade!
    Hope too :3 !
    YW that was a really good french anyway !
 
 
 
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