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    I don't understand why cyclohexanol is not soluble in water.. like its polar and it can form a hydrogen bond with water due to the lone pair present on oxygen so why cant it dissolve in water
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    (Original post by NoorL)
    I don't understand why cyclohexanol is not soluble in water.. like its polar and it can form a hydrogen bond with water due to the lone pair present on oxygen so why cant it dissolve in water
    The molecule has a large non-polar part which forms strong London dispersion forces with other cyclohexanol molecules. The formation of hydrogen bonds with water does not compensate for the loss of these London forces.

    TLDR

    Cyclohexanol bonds to itself better than to water.
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    (Original post by charco)
    The molecule has a large non-polar part which forms strong London dispersion forces with other cyclohexanol molecules. The formation of hydrogen bonds with water does not compensate for the loss of these London forces.

    TLDR

    Cyclohexanol bonds to itself better than to water.
    aha, but why does this stop the polar part of cyclohexanol to hydrogen bond with water and hence become partially polar???? does the bulky shape of it have anything to do with it
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    (Original post by NoorL)
    aha, but why does this stop the polar part of cyclohexanol to hydrogen bond with water and hence become partially polar????
    It either forms a hydrogen bond and only hydrogen bonds, or it only bonds with other cyclohexanols
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    Besides, I don't even think regular hexanol is soluble in water.
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    (Original post by NoorL)
    aha, but why does this stop the polar part of cyclohexanol to hydrogen bond with water and hence become partially polar???? does the bulky shape of it have anything to do with it
    The London dispersion force attraction is stronger than the hydrogen bond attraction ... and not bonding to water allows the water to keep bonding to itself.

    The system goes with the route of stronger bonds ...
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    (Original post by charco)
    The London dispersion force attraction is stronger than the hydrogen bond attraction ... and not bonding to water allows the water to keep bonding to itself.

    The system goes with the route of stronger bonds ...
    alright , thanks a lot for helping!
 
 
 
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