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    On Unistats, Economics at the University of Bath (the course I am applying to) has:
    58% Overall satisfaction with the quality of the course
    27% Feedback on my work has helped me clarify things I did not understand
    50% The course is well organised and is running smoothly

    Among other figures, these figures are particularly low in comparison with top universities.

    Any students care to elaborate?
    Is it general discourse with the teaching of neoclassical over other theories?
    Is it actually that the Uni of Bath is not great for Economic students
    Is it that the students were too picky, because they are so clever to spot the problems where others at other universities cannot?

    There must be something, as the graduates have great chance of employment, so why are these stats so low?

    Massive importance to me, I have not the opportunity to visit the students myself on an open day and it may be my firm or not an option, dependent on these responses
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    Because the department is really awful. I've elaborated my experiences with them numerous times - so if you have a look at my past posts through my profile you should be able to find it.
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    I'm interested in this too.
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    Hello, current second year economics student here.

    To be perfectly honest, I feel as though RibenaRockstar is probably in the best position to comment on this, having had experience with more than one department (i.e. having something else to compare with), but I can give it my best shot too.

    I would say the approach the department takes with the teaching of the course is rather hands-off, the number of contact hours is relatively low for a University of Bath course, especially compared to the likes of mathematics and other sciences. You will rarely be expected to regularly present work, or be made to actively contribute in seminars in the way that you might do in other social sciences modules (I did take one politics module last year and the seminars involved a great deal more discussion and interaction). Often times seminars will literally be an hour of watching/listening to somebody write the answers to a problem set on a board. In terms of seminar and lecture quality, it can really vary. There are some great teachers and some not so great teachers, I would say that the distribution of the good/bad lecturers seems far from optimal. I'd have expected all of the bad ones to be teaching the (relatively) unimportant first year modules, but I've experienced a few this year as well. In terms of their contactability, this again can vary, some will respond fairly quickly to queries about course content, some will outright dismiss your questions and tell you to read the notes a bit more (to be fair this was one specific lecturer). Your tutor will not go out of their way to help you out unless you go to them, I don't have a problem with this personally, but I suppose it may be difficult for some.

    All in all I do feel as though the course caters well to the typical career-oriented (as opposed to academically-oriented) Bath Economics student. We have a lot of spare time in which we have a lot of personal responsibility, we don't constantly have to worry about getting bits of work in every few days as opposed to some courses, or organising a ton of presentations etc. If you want to come here to get a placement and a grad job offer afterwards, you'll probably have a good time, but if you see yourself wanting to fully focus on the academic side of things I'd probably look elsewhere first.
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    That's really helpful, thank you.
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    (Original post by RibenaRockstar)
    Because the department is really awful. I've elaborated my experiences with them numerous times - so if you have a look at my past posts through my profile you should be able to find it.
    Quoting myself to elaborate the experiences properly (since I'm now procrastinating)


    The Economics department has been pretty awful in all my dealings with them. It took a lecturer six weeks to reply to my requests to get feedback on an exam I'd done really, really badly in (as in, failed badly) - and they only actually got back to me after I'd raised the issue with the Head of Department.

    Despite lectures often being taken by high-rank academics, the seminars are led by PhD students who often aren't at all good at teaching (though neither are all the academics) or at speaking English clearly. I usually left Economics seminars more confused than I went into them.
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    (Original post by RibenaRockstar)
    Quoting myself to elaborate the experiences properly (since I'm now procrastinating)


    The Economics department has been pretty awful in all my dealings with them. It took a lecturer six weeks to reply to my requests to get feedback on an exam I'd done really, really badly in (as in, failed badly) - and they only actually got back to me after I'd raised the issue with the Head of Department.

    Despite lectures often being taken by high-rank academics, the seminars are led by PhD students who often aren't at all good at teaching (though neither are all the academics) or at speaking English clearly. I usually left Economics seminars more confused than I went into them.
    100% this. Genuinely the most accurate review I have read of the course.
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    (Original post by Pro Crastination)
    Hello, current second year economics student here.

    To be perfectly honest, I feel as though RibenaRockstar is probably in the best position to comment on this, having had experience with more than one department (i.e. having something else to compare with), but I can give it my best shot too.

    I would say the approach the department takes with the teaching of the course is rather hands-off, the number of contact hours is relatively low for a University of Bath course, especially compared to the likes of mathematics and other sciences. You will rarely be expected to regularly present work, or be made to actively contribute in seminars in the way that you might do in other social sciences modules (I did take one politics module last year and the seminars involved a great deal more discussion and interaction). Often times seminars will literally be an hour of watching/listening to somebody write the answers to a problem set on a board. In terms of seminar and lecture quality, it can really vary. There are some great teachers and some not so great teachers, I would say that the distribution of the good/bad lecturers seems far from optimal. I'd have expected all of the bad ones to be teaching the (relatively) unimportant first year modules, but I've experienced a few this year as well. In terms of their contactability, this again can vary, some will respond fairly quickly to queries about course content, some will outright dismiss your questions and tell you to read the notes a bit more (to be fair this was one specific lecturer). Your tutor will not go out of their way to help you out unless you go to them, I don't have a problem with this personally, but I suppose it may be difficult for some.

    All in all I do feel as though the course caters well to the typical career-oriented (as opposed to academically-oriented) Bath Economics student. We have a lot of spare time in which we have a lot of personal responsibility, we don't constantly have to worry about getting bits of work in every few days as opposed to some courses, or organising a ton of presentations etc. If you want to come here to get a placement and a grad job offer afterwards, you'll probably have a good time, but if you see yourself wanting to fully focus on the academic side of things I'd probably look elsewhere first.

    Could not thank you enough for this post, thank you so much for taking the time to write this
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    (Original post by Fas)
    100% this. Genuinely the most accurate review I have read of the course.
    Thankyou for corroborating here - so helpful!
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    (Original post by RibenaRockstar)
    Quoting myself to elaborate the experiences properly (since I'm now procrastinating)


    The Economics department has been pretty awful in all my dealings with them. It took a lecturer six weeks to reply to my requests to get feedback on an exam I'd done really, really badly in (as in, failed badly) - and they only actually got back to me after I'd raised the issue with the Head of Department.

    Despite lectures often being taken by high-rank academics, the seminars are led by PhD students who often aren't at all good at teaching (though neither are all the academics) or at speaking English clearly. I usually left Economics seminars more confused than I went into them.
    Thankyou so so much for taking the time to write this
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    Damn Uni of Bath is tripping.
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    I was wondering whether anyone on this feed had an opinion on whether to go to Bath or Bristol for economics?
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    There's a thread in the economics section where you'd get a better response regarding Bath v Bristol.
 
 
 
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