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How do de-stress... watch

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    I'm in Year 10 and I find myself stressing about exams a lot even though I've still got another year before I actually sit my exams. Even the idea of mocks freaks me out. So far, I've managed to keep it to myself but I don't think I can do so any longer. The thing is I don't know why it happens ... I've always done really well at school (and still do) but I still feel as though I'm not doing as good as I personally want to. I feel as though I have too much pressure on my GCSEs even though I know that they're not as important as they seem. I'm just scared that I won't do well.

    What should I do? I really want to do well in my exams but the pressure's killing me. Please Help! Thanks
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
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    Just remember you aren't going to do any better by stressing yourself out!
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    It's normal to feel stressed, trust me it will pass. By the time you get to exams it's summer, you've been doing the content for 3 years and you've done a million practice exams it's not scary at all.


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    Firstly, thanks for your replies. Really appreciated.

    (Original post by Ribenas)
    Just remember you aren't going to do any better by stressing yourself out!
    The problem is that I don't know how to stop stressing. Whenever I do any homework or revision, it just reminds me of how much I'm going to have to know and remember for the exams and that just worries me so much.

    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    It's normal to feel stressed, trust me it will pass. By the time you get to exams it's summer, you've been doing the content for 3 years and you've done a million practice exams it's not scary at all.
    I just worry that despite all the work I do, I won't be able to remember it or do the questions in the actual exam.
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    Keep calm and carry on.

    As long as you do your absolute best on each mock there is nothing to stress about.
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    breathing exercises
    (3 times a day for around 3 - 5 minutes)
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    Try some meditation or mindfulness and make sure you have a healthy work / life balance with lots of exercise.
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    (Original post by TeeEm)
    breathing exercises
    (3 times a day for around 3 - 5 minutes)
    (Original post by dean01234)
    Try some meditation or mindfulness and make sure you have a healthy work / life balance with lots of exercise.
    Will definitely try them both. I've started doing more exercise but I'll try the other stuff too. Thanks
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Will definitely try them both. I've started doing more exercise but I'll try the other stuff too. Thanks
    hope it works well for you.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Keep calm and carry on.

    As long as you do your absolute best on each mock there is nothing to stress about.
    I'll try my best. Thanks for your advice!
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    HEY YOU'RE BASICALLY ME A YEAR AGO

    >don't stop caring: because you clearly want to do well and know that that is a good thing!
    >If you want to turn your stress into productivity, go for it! I wish I had done more topic summaries and extra work sometimes (particularly with my languages)
    >don't listen to people who say 'oh but you're only in year ten' because every year is important, granted, it's not something you should worry about too much but don't feel ashamed of your stress lmao
    >drink tea, tea is great (when it's late drink, like, fennel tea or stuff without caffeine kkk)
    >OH YEAH sleep a lot and enjoy free time
    >do breathing exercises and tbh general exercise is always good

    GOOD LUCK I BELIEVE IN YOUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU :yy:
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    (Original post by Milzime)
    HEY YOU'RE BASICALLY ME A YEAR AGO

    >don't stop caring: because you clearly want to do well and know that that is a good thing!
    >If you want to turn your stress into productivity, go for it! I wish I had done more topic summaries and extra work sometimes (particularly with my languages)
    >don't listen to people who say 'oh but you're only in year ten' because every year is important, granted, it's not something you should worry about too much but don't feel ashamed of your stress lmao
    >drink tea, tea is great (when it's late drink, like, fennel tea or stuff without caffeine kkk)
    >OH YEAH sleep a lot and enjoy free time
    >do breathing exercises and tbh general exercise is always good

    GOOD LUCK I BELIEVE IN YOUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU :yy:
    Thanks for your reply. I'll try and do everything you've suggested. I already drink a lot of caffeine (in both tea and coffee) so I probably shouldn't do that - although I might try ones without caffeine. Another thing I struggle with is sleep. I'm always too distracted so I find it hard to just fall asleep. I try and wake up earlier so that I'm more tired at night but I'm not really sure if it's helping.
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    Try to remember that while GCSEs are important in your life right now in a few years they won't matter so much. Nothing is worth making yourself ill over, and often when we stress about things we alter our performance for the worse rather than better. Take care of yourself outside of your academic work - make sure to take time out to relax and do things for fun (I'm not saying you have to go out partying - I have never partied hard myself, but I did make sure there was life outside my school work whether it was reading an unrelated book, watching a light-hearted comedy on TV, or listening to an audiobook/music). You will absorb your work much better if you're not always actively trying to memorise it. Our memory works well when it is given a break, so put relaxing activities in your schedule knowing they will ultimately improve your performance.

    And the best way to improve your grades if you want to try and achieve more is to take notice of past papers. Passing exams is as much about technique as it is about knowledge and I think that spending some time reading mark schemes and figuring out what examiners want is really valuable and it can help focus you in an exam as well as maybe settle your mind about what to expect in the time leading up to exams.
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    (Original post by mscaffrey)
    Try to remember that while GCSEs are important in your life right now in a few years they won't matter so much. Nothing is worth making yourself ill over, and often when we stress about things we alter our performance for the worse rather than better. Take care of yourself outside of your academic work - make sure to take time out to relax and do things for fun (I'm not saying you have to go out partying - I have never partied hard myself, but I did make sure there was life outside my school work whether it was reading an unrelated book, watching a light-hearted comedy on TV, or listening to an audiobook/music). You will absorb your work much better if you're not always actively trying to memorise it. Our memory works well when it is given a break, so put relaxing activities in your schedule knowing they will ultimately improve your performance.

    And the best way to improve your grades if you want to try and achieve more is to take notice of past papers. Passing exams is as much about technique as it is about knowledge and I think that spending some time reading mark schemes and figuring out what examiners want is really valuable and it can help focus you in an exam as well as maybe settle your mind about what to expect in the time leading up to exams.
    Thank you for your reply. Really appreciated.

    I do spend a lot of time listening to music and doing other non-academic activities but I sometimes find that I get too distracted by them (e.g. I've spent all day on TSR today rather than doing my homework which I was planning to do today!) and then when I get back to my work, I feel as though I'm falling behind again because I was distracted too much. This is one of the reasons I get stressed - I feel as though I spend slightly more time on other activities than I wish and then I end up cramming all my work at night to try and do everything I aimed to do that day. One probable reason is that I work better at night but it can mean that I don't get as much sleep as I should be getting, which just gets me even more stressed the next day. I do try and do all my work during that day but I always end up doing it before bed instead because I get less distracted then.

    Sorry for the long reply and all the waffling.
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    Play Euro Truck Simulator. Worked for me before last year's M1 exam
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thank you for your reply. Really appreciated.

    I do spend a lot of time listening to music and doing other non-academic activities but I sometimes find that I get too distracted by them (e.g. I've spent all day on TSR today rather than doing my homework which I was planning to do today!) and then when I get back to my work, I feel as though I'm falling behind again because I was distracted too much. This is one of the reasons I get stressed - I feel as though I spend slightly more time on other activities than I wish and then I end up cramming all my work at night to try and do everything I aimed to do that day. One probable reason is that I work better at night but it can mean that I don't get as much sleep as I should be getting, which just gets me even more stressed the next day. I do try and do all my work during that day but I always end up doing it before bed instead because I get less distracted then.

    Sorry for the long reply and all the waffling.
    Don't worry about waffling! I am the Queen of waffle, and everything you're saying makes complete sense. I know what it's like to be distracted, especially by the Internet. I've found that the only way for me to have a truly productive day is to avoid going on the Internet until I've completed at least one or two tasks. I know it's difficult if you have to check emails every morning in case teachers have sent you information that you need to act on, but the Internet is so addictive that once you've got on it it's difficult to get off. When you get the urge to go on the Internet pick up a book instead. I often think about the work I could get done if I lazily read books instead of lazily scrolling through websites. It takes a similar energy to do but you'll feel better if you take the book option. It might be worth putting a holiday message on your emails, if you can set that up, just saying something like 'I don't have constant access to my emails right now, so if you need to contact me urgently please call or text me on...'. That way you can't make the excuse of 'well, I need to check my emails in case there's something urgent on there'.

    I totally sympathise with you, though. I tend to read before bed on a night and I always wish I'd been doing it all day because it feels productive and actually more relaxing than what I waste my time with during the day but it's so hard to find the discipline when there are distractions around.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Play Euro Truck Simulator. Worked for me before last year's M1 exam

    Not sure how that will help but I'll look into it.

    (Original post by mscaffrey)
    Don't worry about waffling! I am the Queen of waffle, and everything you're saying makes complete sense. I know what it's like to be distracted, especially by the Internet. I've found that the only way for me to have a truly productive day is to avoid going on the Internet until I've completed at least one or two tasks. I know it's difficult if you have to check emails every morning in case teachers have sent you information that you need to act on, but the Internet is so addictive that once you've got on it it's difficult to get off. When you get the urge to go on the Internet pick up a book instead. I often think about the work I could get done if I lazily read books instead of lazily scrolling through websites. It takes a similar energy to do but you'll feel better if you take the book option. It might be worth putting a holiday message on your emails, if you can set that up, just saying something like 'I don't have constant access to my emails right now, so if you need to contact me urgently please call or text me on...'. That way you can't make the excuse of 'well, I need to check my emails in case there's something urgent on there'.

    I totally sympathise with you, though. I tend to read before bed on a night and I always wish I'd been doing it all day because it feels productive and actually more relaxing than what I waste my time with during the day but it's so hard to find the discipline when there are distractions around.
    Thanks again for your help and support. I don't use my emails that much since our school has an online system where teachers can put up announcements and task, etc. but I usually waste time on the internet just scrolling around and searching random stuff, not forgetting YouTube which is another big distraction. It's harder because I use the internet for my work as well e.g. looking at past papers and online revision websites so I always have an excuse to use it. I so try and work more from books that the internet just so I don't get distracted but there's always something I need that's not in the book.
    And you're advice on reading books is also good. I do read a lot of books but I just find it hard to start reading a book - it's easy to do it once you've actually started reading one but picking it up is difficult, which is reflected by the pile of books I still want to read. I will try and read more though.

    Thanks again for your reply
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Not sure how that will help but I'll look into it.
    Driving a truck around Europe requires calm, patience, and a bit of appetite for routine stuff (like gear changes, checking your mirrors, that sort of thing). It's ideal if you don't want to think about anything else and just want to blank out for a bit.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Driving a truck around Europe requires calm, patience, and a bit of appetite for routine stuff (like gear changes, checking your mirrors, that sort of thing). It's ideal if you don't want to think about anything else and just want to blank out for a bit.
    Ok, I'll be sure to try it.
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    What works well for me is to have little moments throughout the day where I do things I love. For example, I tend to get to work a little early and drink my coffee in peace and read the newspaper. A colleague of mine goes for a run every lunch break and he's probably the most relaxed person I know. Point being, find something you really enjoy and make sure you can do it often. It gives you a goal to work towards.
 
 
 
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