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    im preparing a presentation for english class on school exams in the uk and us
    i know of GCSE and A-levels but there are still some things i dont quite understand
    id be grateful if someone could sloowly explain it to me
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    I'm from Scotland and we get "Nationals" not GCSE. They change it all the time. At first when I was in 4th year I did 'standard grades' and when I went into 5th year it changed to 'intermediates' and when i finally reached 6th year (last year) they changed it again! To nationals!
    So in Scotland you get Nationals and then highers and advanced highers in your senior years. Most of our 4th years won't get exams because you dont get them if your doing National level 4 and under. Only National 5, highers and advanced highers get exams now which is stupid because a few people leave at the end of 4th year which means there now not going to have any grades
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    Well basically you get Pre-School GCSE's, High school GSCE's, A level/AS Level/Extended Diploma/National Diploma, BA and MA (usually).

    Primary school grades are just to provide a general knowledge of your capabilities to your highschool, so they can offer you extra help upon starting high school,if necessary. These results often determine 'Sets 1-4' in class groups, 1 being the most capable and 4 being those who need extra help. However, most high schools will test you themselves, giving you an extra chance.

    Achieving 5 A-C GCSE's deems you eligible for a standard, lower class job, which may involve speaking, basic addition and general knowledge, such as stacking shelves in a supermarket. You may need to count how many cans fit the width of each shelf, you may need to direct a customer to another aisle. Such grades would also deem you eligible to apply to most higher education courses and HE programmes in college to further your education, sometimes offering a chance to resit your exams for free if you were only a few marks off of a C. What most people don't know, is a D and E are still actually not a Fail, but are not seen as highly as a A-C grade, deeming you eligible for minimal jobs such as cleaning jobs.

    If you achieve mainly A-C grades and get into college, you are at the stage where you are preparing to be eligible for a middle class job, almost a form of training or experience. Such jobs often require basic language and mathematics skills as well as TRUST, DISCIPLINE and MONEY, this could be a teacher/ teaching assistant, child carer or a till worker in a supermarket.These courses are often 2-3 years, showing a level of commitment and determination.
    If by the end of this course/programme, your general attendance is of around 80%, your grades are up to standard and you're teachers offer good reports of your behavior and commitment to your chosen area, you are eligible to apply for a BA course.

    A BA course is looked upon very highly, upon receiving your BA, if you pass with 1st, 2nd or third class honours, the letters BA appear after your name on documentation to show that you have such qualities. Before applying to such a course, you are often required to provide an accessible personal statement, Criminal Record check and provide information of bank details (in order to receive student finance, which is a loan of up to around £2,000 which is paid every 4 months to help towards bills, food, general maintenance such as clothing, travel and of course materials if and when necessary. Having a BA may mean you are looking to become a higher level teacher, a dentist, doctor or pharmacist. (Generally higher paid jobs that require more trust, longer hours and harder graft).

    If after 8 years in pre school, 5 years in high school, potentially 2 years in A Level/AS Level and/or Levels 1-3(years 1,2,3) of National/Extended Diploma and 3-4 Years Degree (BA) you may wish to also apply for a MA.

    An MA is for extremely high paid jobs, at an extremely advance level of education, they can be 3-4 years and 5-10 years, depending on the job you are aiming for. This is obviously a huge statement to your employer as it shows real commitment. However, BA and MA courses are not compulsory for middle class jobs which pay £30,000 and under per year.

    Hope this helps.
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    (Original post by GreekTea)
    Well basically you get Pre-School GCSE's, High school GSCE's, A level/AS Level/Extended Diploma/National Diploma, BA and MA (usually).
    wtf are 'Pre-School GCSE's'?
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    (Original post by Arkasia)
    wtf are 'Pre-School GCSE's'?
    The local schools in my area took SATS in year 5 and our first set of GSCE's in year 6,just before leaving for high school.

    It was a new requirement of our local schools to test suitability and potential. I also took my first O level at 13 due to such requirements. This may not apply to academically lower children.
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    its great! thank you, you helped you me a lot
    can you just tell me one more thing, what about dissertations/thesis at universities? are these necessary to graduate or is it just an addition?

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    (Original post by GreekTea)
    The local schools in my area took SATS in year 5 and our first set of GSCE's in year 6,just before leaving for high school.

    It was a new requirement of our local schools to test suitability and potential. I also took my first O level at 13 due to such requirements. This may not apply to academically lower children.
    Damn, we took SATS in Year 5 and Year 9, 11+ in Year 6, and GCSEs in Year 11 (some people did a few in Year 10).
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    (Original post by GreekTea)
    The local schools in my area took SATS in year 5 and our first set of GSCE's in year 6,just before leaving for high school.

    It was a new requirement of our local schools to test suitability and potential. I also took my first O level at 13 due to such requirements. This may not apply to academically lower children.
    Really?? Which GCSEs did you take in Year 6? And how did you all do?
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    (Original post by ragnarofk)
    im preparing a presentation for english class on school exams in the uk and us
    i know of GCSE and A-levels but there are still some things i dont quite understand
    id be grateful if someone could sloowly explain it to me
    Scotland does have a different system but England, Wales and Northern Ireland follow similar ones. I think the explanation you have been given for England is a bit weird so treat it with caution. Haven't time to reply properly but will try to in due course.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    Scotland does have a different system but England, Wales and Northern Ireland follow similar ones. I think the explanation you have been given for England is a bit weird so treat it with caution. Haven't time to reply properly but will try to in due course.
    it's not necessary anymore, I've just presented it but thank you!
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    (Original post by ragnarofk)
    its great! thank you, you helped you me a lot
    can you just tell me one more thing, what about dissertations/thesis at universities? are these necessary to graduate or is it just an addition?

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    Yes they are necessary to pass as it is an accessible form of self reflection and rationale.

    You will find that art students usually only have 2,000 words in their first year, 4,000 in their second year and 6,000 words in their final year.( Generally less than other students because they use physical expression to reflect on their ideas), Whereas English students may have 5,000, 10,000 and 20,000.

    One of my tutors took a 40,000 word one. The word count is variable depending on your chosen path.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    Really?? Which GCSEs did you take in Year 6? And how did you all do?
    It was only Mathematics, English and Sciences- but was a form of GCSE that was academically higher that SATS but differential to that of final GCSE's taken in year 11. It was a trial to help improve grades of high school students in year 7- i don't know if they followed through with it.

    As predicted, the students who were slightly academically higher passed with A-C grades whereas others failed significantly.
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    (Original post by Arkasia)
    Damn, we took SATS in Year 5 and Year 9, 11+ in Year 6, and GCSEs in Year 11 (some people did a few in Year 10).
    The theory itself was not reasonable in that it was, in my opinion, an inefficient way to improve the lowered grading criteria of high school entrance, because if a student failed they were able to erase such sitting of these exams, along with the grades, making the entire process non existent for small cost. Which every parent did regardless of result to reduce the pressure of competing for superiority before even entering high school.
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    In addition, other comments made on this post are all very relevant and accurate. My educational programming through pre-school education was a unique case. Generally sats are taken through primary school, Various forms of mock exams are used through high schoolsand final GCSE's should only betaken in your final year (11).
 
 
 
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