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What do you think schools should teach about the 'real world'? watch

  • View Poll Results: What do you think schools should teach about the 'real world'?
    Money - managing money, taxes, bank account basics, loans, etc
    47
    73.44%
    Childcare - what to do if you get pregnant, juggling children+jobs/education, etc
    21
    32.81%
    Politics - party basics, explaining policies, etc
    41
    64.06%
    Health - first aid, mental health (how to spot it in yourself and others and how to help), the importance of regular checkups, etc
    40
    62.50%
    The Law - our rights, basic laws, what having a police record means, etc
    44
    68.75%

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    As in compulsory subjects, not in clubs or as part of an optional subject.
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    In terms of things like taxes and managing finances? Nothing, because the point of school is to prepare you for work, not life.
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    That the world ain't all Sunshines and Rainbows
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    21
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    how **** it is lmfao
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    16
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    Mum tells me Idk about it like everyday. Being taught in school won't make it any better bruh.
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    (Original post by Mayhem™)
    In terms of things like taxes and managing finances? Nothing, because the point of school is to prepare you for work, not life.
    If that's the case, why not scrap PSHE? The dangers of drinking and unsafe sex have **** all to do with work. In theory, yes, it would make sense for school to just prepare you for whatever job you want to have. But in reality they're dealing with kids who often don't get all of this knowledge from home or elsewhere. Schools have a responsibility to prepare children for the world they are going to face when they leave education, and they know that, or else PSHE wouldn't be a thing.
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    How to love. (the world has lost it's love)
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    Swearrr Tupac said about teaching the
    'real world' in a interview when he was 17 or something.
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    (Original post by lameteenager)
    The dangers of drinking and unsafe sex have **** all to do with work.
    These two are common sense, for someone to have unsafe sex( especially under-age), takes some special kind of stupidity. While drinking isn't a great issue as it's hard to get at a young age (any sane parent would limit the amount their child is open to, e.g. not allowing them to go to obvious parties or warning them of the consequences); the major issue with it is drink driving, which won't apply to anyone in secondary education or below.


    (Original post by lameteenager)
    But in reality they're dealing with kids who often don't get all of this knowledge from home or elsewhere.
    The school isn't at fault for this, children are extremely curious about the 'real world' and tend to find out a lot through ways such as the internet or adults(prime example being relatives and local community members). As a year 11 student, I'd much rather be taught academic information than how to put a condom on (the instructions are on the packaging, so it'd take someone really special to mess that up), or open a bank account (very simple stuff, just Google it fellow teenagers).


    (Original post by lameteenager)
    PSHE wouldn't be a thing.
    Not sure if my school are breaking laws here but I haven't had PSHE since year 8 and I know everything if not more than what would have been taught in those classes.


    Of course, I might just be an exception; but the reality is that my generation expect too much from everyone else, and aren't willing to put some effort into developing an understanding of the 'real world'.
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    > how to pay taxes
    > how the banks work, credit cards, debit cards, ISA's etc...
    > how to get a job
    > more career advise, especially in the lower school.
    > reality of the world
    > learn more about different religions and cultures around the world
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    I guess they should also teach more about society and the messed-up norms or ideologies some has, and how it influences majority of people.
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    TSR Support Team
    Learn more about physical and mental health.

    More career advice. At school, all we got told was what uni course to apply for that suited a career we might fancy. A lot of us didn't fancy going to uni and we had to learn to apply for jobs on our own.

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    >Mental Health
    >Basic Politics
    >Career Advice which most schools give anyway iirc
    >First Aid
    >A brief overview of bank accounts as someone mentioned above plus how "credit" and credit cards work.

    The latter does seem a bit huh for a 16 year old but eh.

    Those are the things that would appear most useful.
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    It's fine how it is.


    School is there to prepare you for work, I wouldn't want to go in to be taught how not to be a degenerate chav because my parents did that for me and I don't want to have my time wasted any more than it already is.
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    "Life isn't about which cup of tea you want to drink, it is about which bowl of **** you are going to eat" - My Chiropractor

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    (Original post by Lehoe)
    It's fine how it is.


    School is there to prepare you for work, I wouldn't want to go in to be taught how not to be a degenerate chav because my parents did that for me and I don't want to have my time wasted any more than it already is.
    Not everyone's parents do though? Okay, here's an example. When my school had a sex ed assembly on the ins and outs of the laws of consent, they said that if you had inappropriate pictures of someone under the age of 18, you were in possession of child pornography. Half the people in the room crapped themselves. They all figured because they were over the age of consent for sex (16) then they were doing nothing illegal by swapping nudes. It actually takes knowledge of the law to know some of these things, not just common sense, and not everyone is lucky enough to have parents who tell them.
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    (Original post by Mayhem™)
    The school isn't at fault for this, children are extremely curious about the 'real world' and tend to find out a lot through ways such as the internet or adults(prime example being relatives and local community members). As a year 11 student, I'd much rather be taught academic information than how to put a condom on (the instructions are on the packaging, so it'd take someone really special to mess that up), or open a bank account (very simple stuff, just Google it fellow teenagers).
    Are you sure? I mean, do you know the statistics of the number of children who research these things on their own? I know it sounds stupid, but there are people who left school at the same time I did with no knowledge of basic things because they simply hadn't given it a moments thought.
    "What party do you support?"
    "Oh I don't know, it's all very confusing. I probably just won't vote."
    People under the age of 25 don't all consider the future (particularly when they're still in education) all that well...blame our silly underdeveloped brains, maybe. Because not all parents are the same, I honestly think it's up to schools to equip kids with some basic knowledge before they're thrown into a world they don't know the first thing about.

    And of course I'm not talking about instead of academic work. Our PSHE took place twice a week during registration. Twenty minutes a week doesn't sound much, but over the years it added up.
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    (Original post by Mayhem™)

    The school isn't at fault for this, children are extremely curious about the 'real world' and tend to find out a lot through ways such as the internet or adults(prime example being relatives and local community members). As a year 11 student, I'd much rather be taught academic information than how to put a condom on (the instructions are on the packaging, so it'd take someone really special to mess that up), or open a bank account (very simple stuff, just Google it fellow teenagers).
    Yeah okay there is some stuff listed which is pretty basic, like putting a condom on or opening a bank account. Most people will be able to work that out for themselves.

    School absolutely is not about preparing you for work (In almost no way does it). It should be about helping kids to start to mature into well rounded people. The thing is that while people might look up things directly relevant to them, school is the perfect opportunity to teach people things that they won't research.

    Starting to talk about and educate on mental health from a young age not only reduces stigma but will help people to realise when they might need to seek help.

    By college 80/90% of students had 0 interest in politics, starting to debate issues that affect kids in class will make them start to think about it and become better informed voters.

    It was recently shown that young people have a very high tolerance for accepting controlling / manipulative behaviour in relationships, something else which could be addressed.
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    (Original post by lameteenager)
    As in compulsory subjects, not in clubs or as part of an optional subject.
    this
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xe6nLVXEC0
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    that it sucks deeply & you will realize that death is a merciful release.
 
 
 
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