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    - Private school
    - Grammar school
    - Comprehensive school
    - Public school
    - Independent school
    - State school


    What's the difference between all these?
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    (Original post by XMaramena)
    - Private school
    - Grammar school
    - Comprehensive school
    - Public school
    - Independent school
    - State school


    What's the difference between all these?
    In the UK (generally there are exceptions)
    State schools are free to study at. State schools include comprehensives (which are non-selective) and some Grammars (which select students based on an exam called the 11+). Grammars only exist in some areas. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State-...ools_(England) explains the system https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gramma...rammar_schools explains where grammars still exist within the state sector.

    Independent schools are fee paying. They're also sometimes called Private schools. A lot of them are former state Grammar schools that chose to become private rather than give up selection. Public schools in the UK are a small selection of very old independent/private fee paying schools (they're called public because of historical reasons - they were created before any state funded schooling was available). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indepe...nited_Kingdom) and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public...nited_Kingdom) give more information about the independent sector (and exactly which UK schools are public schools).

    In other countries the term public school is often used as a synonym for state school.
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    (Original post by XMaramena)
    - Private school
    - Grammar school
    - Comprehensive school
    - Public school
    - Independent school
    - State school


    What's the difference between all these?
    Independent = Private - I think some private schools are also called public schools in the uk? Otherwise public schools are internationally, schools that anyone can attend.

    Grammar schools used to be all boy-schools, nowadays a grammar school is usually an academically selective state school. In some countries (i.e. Australia) a grammar school is a private school.

    Comprehensives are state schools - they aren't selective.
    And a state school is usually a government funded school. They all get inspected by Ofsted whereas Private schools in the uk have their own inspectors
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    (Original post by iwishicouldfly14)
    Independent = Private - I think some private schools are also called public schools in the uk? Otherwise public schools are internationally, schools that anyone can attend.

    Grammar schools used to be all boy-schools, nowadays a grammar school is usually an academically selective state school. In some countries (i.e. Australia) a grammar school is a private school.

    Comprehensives are state schools - they aren't selective.
    And a state school is usually a government funded school. They all get inspected by Ofsted whereas Private schools in the uk have their own inspectors
    I went to what you would call a "Private" school, it's inspected by Ofsted.
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    (Original post by XMaramena)
    I went to what you would call a "Private" school, it's inspected by Ofsted.
    Maybe I made a mistake.
    I think most private schools don't get inspected by Ofsted..... though I maybe wrong again
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    I'm at an independent/private school and we are inspected in same way as state schools. There are no grammar schools in Scotland - well there is by name - Aberdeen Grammar - but it's a comprehensive same as all the other city academies. I think all Scottish state high schools are referred to as academies.
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    (Original post by DougallnDougall)
    I'm at an independent/private school and we are inspected in same way as state schools. There are no grammar schools in Scotland - well there is by name - Aberdeen Grammar - but it's a comprehensive same as all the other city academies. I think all Scottish state high schools are referred to as academies.
    For us in England, and "Academy" is a secondary school with a special status - I think it gets a bit more money from the government and gets a bit more freedom - but I'm not sure.

    But really terrible schools can become academies so it doesn't really mean much.
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    (Original post by iwishicouldfly14)
    For us in England, and "Academy" is a secondary school with a special status - I think it gets a bit more money from the government and gets a bit more freedom - but I'm not sure.

    But really terrible schools can become academies so it doesn't really mean much.
    Yeah I've read a bit about it in the papers. The worst sort of privatisation with companies with zilch experience of education having control over young people's future. Seems like English education is going backwards instead of forward. Such a shame politicians keep messing about with it. Some of the articles - mostly guardian - about the ridiculous emphasis on uniform have made me laugh but also feel sorry for the kids. We have a tradition of a winter and summer uniform which everyone sticks too but no teacher ever challenges girls about the length of their kilts and stuff like that. How in hell's name does a skirt to your knees make you a better scholar? From here it seems farcical.
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    Private = independent in Scotland - our system is entirely different from England's. Public schools are as you say the likes of Eton, Harrow etc. They all are fee paying though obviously some way more expensive than others. Some are day schools, some are boarding and some are a mixture of day and boarding.
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    (Original post by DougallnDougall)
    Yeah I've read a bit about it in the papers. The worst sort of privatisation with companies with zilch experience of education having control over young people's future. Seems like English education is going backwards instead of forward. Such a shame politicians keep messing about with it. Some of the articles - mostly guardian - about the ridiculous emphasis on uniform have made me laugh but also feel sorry for the kids. We have a tradition of a winter and summer uniform which everyone sticks too but no teacher ever challenges girls about the length of their kilts and stuff like that. How in hell's name does a skirt to your knees make you a better scholar? From here it seems farcical.
    My current school is an Academy and it's one of the top ns state schools in the country....

    In primary schools there's summer and winter uniforms. And in some girls school near(ish) where I live they have a summer shirt.
    Our kilts have to be at our knees and the teachers are really stupid about it. They used to not care and know we get detentions but it's stupid for us Year 11s. This is our last year of uniform and if our skirts are too short, we're not going out especially to buy a new skirt. In most cases it's girls rolling skirts up - but I still think it's stupid (admittedly my school is a faith school)....
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    (Original post by iwishicouldfly14)
    My current school is an Academy and it's one of the top ns state schools in the country....

    In primary schools there's summer and winter uniforms. And in some girls school near(ish) where I live they have a summer shirt.
    Our kilts have to be at our knees and the teachers are really stupid about it. They used to not care and know we get detentions but it's stupid for us Year 11s. This is our last year of uniform and if our skirts are too short, we're not going out especially to buy a new skirt. In most cases it's girls rolling skirts up - but I still think it's stupid (admittedly my school is a faith school)....

    In summer we have shop bought tartan kilts - all the same but in winter it's tailor made kilts. I don't know if you have any experience of these or not but these cant be rolled up at the waist. They're pretty expensive to make but the last for yonks. I've been wearing one since I was 5 and now 17 I'm still only in my second one which was made when I was in P6. They're made with the capacity for lengths to be dropped and buckles let out a bit. Needless to say mine is a good bit shorter than when it was made. By 5th and 6th a lot of the girls are in the same position and I think there would be a few angry parents telling school they most certainly wouldn't be investing in an item that is so expensive and unlikely to be worm post Easter term and for just one day at end of term. Our kilts, or rather mine, have worked out way more cheaply than mum having to fork our for new skirts every year. I think my kilt is being kept for my niece who is two. A kilt will last for decades of constant wear.
    We always hoped that school would drop uniform for the 6th as many of the English colleges do but no such luck.
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    (Original post by DougallnDougall)
    In summer we have shop bought tartan kilts - all the same but in winter it's tailor made kilts. I don't know if you have any experience of these or not but these cant be rolled up at the waist. They're pretty expensive to make but the last for yonks. I've been wearing one since I was 5 and now 17 I'm still only in my second one which was made when I was in P6. They're made with the capacity for lengths to be dropped and buckles let out a bit. Needless to say mine is a good bit shorter than when it was made. By 5th and 6th a lot of the girls are in the same position and I think there would be a few angry parents telling school they most certainly wouldn't be investing in an item that is so expensive and unlikely to be worm post Easter term and for just one day at end of term. Our kilts, or rather mine, have worked out way more cheaply than mum having to fork our for new skirts every year. I think my kilt is being kept for my niece who is two. A kilt will last for decades of constant wear.
    We always hoped that school would drop uniform for the 6th as many of the English colleges do but no such luck.
    Ours aren't proper kilts - they just look like a kilt and I think we wear them similarly to a kilt. Ours aren't too expensive - but they are quite a bit if you have to buy a new one every year. All mine are too big. They don't have adjustable waists and I bought mine when I was in Year 8 or 9 (I'm not in Year 11) and I've lost a couple of stone since then. So I have to roll mine up to keep it on me!
    We can roll them up, they used to be made differently so we couldn't roll them up but now we can.
    I don't like how some 6th forms make you wear business wear - I'd prefer uniform over that. Though thinking of that, I have seen some really bad uniforms.
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    (Original post by iwishicouldfly14)
    Ours aren't proper kilts - they just look like a kilt and I think we wear them similarly to a kilt. Ours aren't too expensive - but they are quite a bit if you have to buy a new one every year. All mine are too big. They don't have adjustable waists and I bought mine when I was in Year 8 or 9 (I'm not in Year 11) and I've lost a couple of stone since then. So I have to roll mine up to keep it on me!
    We can roll them up, they used to be made differently so we couldn't roll them up but now we can.
    I don't like how some 6th forms make you wear business wear - I'd prefer uniform over that. Though thinking of that, I have seen some really bad uniforms.
    Lol I know what you mean. Tbh ours is quite smart. The winter uniform is very colourful because most girls would have their family tartans. It's only ugly when someone opts for a tartan that looks wrong with a blazer like for instance doubling up a highland dancing tartan - White based - or one which is yellow - I would refuse to wear that full stop. Most tartans are inoffensive. The little ones are mega cute because of course some mum's will have got them way too big and by the end of the day they often droop almost to their ankles. The two extremes of school I guess.
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    (Original post by DougallnDougall)
    Lol I know what you mean. Tbh ours is quite smart. The winter uniform is very colourful because most girls would have their family tartans. It's only ugly when someone opts for a tartan that looks wrong with a blazer like for instance doubling up a highland dancing tartan - White based - or one which is yellow - I would refuse to wear that full stop. Most tartans are inoffensive. The little ones are mega cute because of course some mum's will have got them way too big and by the end of the day they often droop almost to their ankles. The two extremes of school I guess.
    It all sounds very traditional and cool!

    At the beginning the Year 7s (first years) have really long skirts (sometimes down to their ankles) and only when they're brave enough do they bother rolling it up.
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    (Original post by iwishicouldfly14)
    It all sounds very traditional and cool!

    At the beginning the Year 7s (first years) have really long skirts (sometimes down to their ankles) and only when they're brave enough do they bother rolling it up.
    Winter uniform has been the same since 19th C. Summer one just changed 5 years ago. It's a vast improvement on the ugly skirts it replaced though the wee ones were sweet in their little dresses. I think it's adorable seeing the little ones in uniform but at same time i think if it's uncomfortable then that needs to drive change. I do remember feeling quite tired at the end of a day from the weight of my kilt. Pros and cons etc. Summer kilts are lightweight, same tartan and most imp they aren't made a standard length so even if I needed a new one I could still have it at a length that suits me rather than what pleases others. The thing I don't like about uniform is how it's an attempt to crush our identities to mould us into little clones of each other. I know when I first started in the school nursery my mum said she balked when faced with a row of cherubs in identical smocks. Said she wanted to grab me and bolt for the door. In the fullness of time she reckons she's glad She didn't because my dad is such a softie that the discipline of school proved to be a good counter balance to my dad being unable to say No - ha ha till mum stepped in and would say 'I dont think so madam!'
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    (Original post by iwishicouldfly14)
    My current school is an Academy and it's one of the top ns state schools in the country....

    In primary schools there's summer and winter uniforms. And in some girls school near(ish) where I live they have a summer shirt.
    Our kilts have to be at our knees and the teachers are really stupid about it. They used to not care and know we get detentions but it's stupid for us Year 11s. This is our last year of uniform and if our skirts are too short, we're not going out especially to buy a new skirt. In most cases it's girls rolling skirts up - but I still think it's stupid (admittedly my school is a faith school)....

    Do the academies operate as comprehensives do? One of the things that puzzles me about the English system is when I read about children not getting into their local schools and being forced to travel out of zone. Why does that happen? My experience is very limited but as far as I know if you move into a catchment area in Scotland they have to give you a place (I think?). That must be pretty tough for parents maybe having to get kids to different schools for same start time etc.
    Are faith schools governed in the same way as regular schools? I mean do they have to do RE rather than just RI as an example and meet the same standards expected by Ofsted? The system seems much more complicated to me though of course that's just an impression.
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    (Original post by DougallnDougall)
    Do the academies operate as comprehensives do? One of the things that puzzles me about the English system is when I read about children not getting into their local schools and being forced to travel out of zone. Why does that happen? My experience is very limited but as far as I know if you move into a catchment area in Scotland they have to give you a place (I think?). That must be pretty tough for parents maybe having to get kids to different schools for same start time etc.
    Are faith schools governed in the same way as regular schools? I mean do they have to do RE rather than just RI as an example and meet the same standards expected by Ofsted? The system seems much more complicated to me though of course that's just an impression.
    My faith school is a comprehensive. What's RI? We do Religious Studies as a GCSE but the entire school system is the same as any other I think. Same standards.

    When we apply for state schools, we put down 5 or 6 (I don't remember). They don't know which school is your 1st preference and they allocate it based on their criteria i.e. siblings, catchment area, if you're in care.
    A lot of school are very over subscribed in some areas and people move just to get in so there are too many people in 1 catchment area so they get allocated another school. In the very oversubscribed areas, this could be to a different area.
    Some schools have a catchment area of under a mile because they are so undersubscribed!!!
    My school is meant to be changing it's admission criteria so children from feeder schools don't get priority. This means anyone that doesn't live in the town (it's a v.small town) won't get it because there are so many people applying from that town.
    I'm lucky, I live quite a while a way from my school (about 45min-1hour) but I got in on the 3rd round because it wasn't as subscribed as it is now because it was quite a new school.

    My kilts just very ugly and unflattering. It isn't too heavy or anything.
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    (Original post by iwishicouldfly14)
    My faith school is a comprehensive. What's RI? We do Religious Studies as a GCSE but the entire school system is the same as any other I think. Same standards.

    When we apply for state schools, we put down 5 or 6 (I don't remember). They don't know which school is your 1st preference and they allocate it based on their criteria i.e. siblings, catchment area, if you're in care.
    A lot of school are very over subscribed in some areas and people move just to get in so there are too many people in 1 catchment area so they get allocated another school. In the very oversubscribed areas, this could be to a different area.
    Some schools have a catchment area of under a mile because they are so undersubscribed!!!
    My school is meant to be changing it's admission criteria so children from feeder schools don't get priority. This means anyone that doesn't live in the town (it's a v.small town) won't get it because there are so many people applying from that town.
    I'm lucky, I live quite a while a way from my school (about 45min-1hour) but I got in on the 3rd round because it wasn't as subscribed as it is now because it was quite a new school.

    My kilts just very ugly and unflattering. It isn't too heavy or anything.
    RI - religious instruction
    I'm not sure if schools in Edinburgh or Glasgow have that problem of over-subscription or not. Don't think that's an issue here in the NE. You'd think the feeder primaries would get priority. A bit weird to change that.

    Can't say I will be sorry to say cheerio to mine lol!
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    (Original post by DougallnDougall)
    RI - religious instruction
    I'm not sure if schools in Edinburgh or Glasgow have that problem of over-subscription or not. Don't think that's an issue here in the NE. You'd think the feeder primaries would get priority. A bit weird to change that.

    Can't say I will be sorry to say cheerio to mine lol!
    My school's opening up it's own primary so it will get quite a lot of the children om the feeder schools who will move - but it's stupid.

    I really hope I get leave at the end of this year. I so fed up of my school!
 
 
 
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