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    Here is an abstract, regarding racket and bat sports:




    Confusion 1:

    In the beginning, it says that following through, increases the time over which a collision occurs, are we considering the Force to be a "constant" variable in this case, as it's dependant on the person's strength and the bat is "incompressible"?

    Wouldn't the force decrease, if it was not "constant"

    Confusion 2:

    I don't get what it meants, in the later part, how does following through, contributes to an increase in the velocity change of the ball? (Moving faster)?
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    (Original post by SaadKaleem)
    Here is an abstract, regarding racket and bat sports:




    Confusion 1:

    In the beginning, it says that following through, increases the time over which a collision occurs, are we considering the Force to be a "constant" variable in this case, as it's dependant on the person's strength and the bat is "incompressible"?

    Wouldn't the force decrease, if it was not "constant"

    Confusion 2:

    I don't get what it meants, in the later part, how does following through, contributes to an increase in the velocity change of the ball? (Moving faster)?
    The batter's objective to do is change the momentum of the ball by imparting an impulse to it... impulse is the product of force and time, it's SI unit is Newton Second. if you can apply the same force for more time it's more impulse and therefore a greater change in the momentum of the ball...

    but in real life it's quite complicated - the bat and ball are clearly both quite elastic objects when viewed with slow motion photography


    and tbh I thought 'following though' was more of a psychological thing - getting the brain telling the muscles not to try slowing down the bat before it reached the anticipated impact position. I don't think muscles can react quickly enough to make any difference after contact between bat and ball starts (but I could be wrong)
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    The batter's objective to do is change the momentum of the ball by imparting an impulse to it... impulse is the product of force and time, it's SI unit is Newton Second. if you can apply the same force for more time it's more impulse and therefore a greater change in the momentum of the ball...

    but in real life it's quite complicated - the bat and ball are clearly both quite elastic objects when viewed with slow motion photography


    and tbh I thought 'following though' was more of a psychological thing - getting the brain telling the muscles not to try slowing down the bat before it reached the anticipated impact position. I don't think muscles can react quickly enough to make any difference after contact between bat and ball starts (but I could be wrong)
    Thanks, that video was quite nice.

    I don't really play baseball, however I do play Cricket, and I know that sometimes, if your speed of the bat, is equivalent / more than the speed of the ball, you can sometimes, feel the "extra" time, the ball is in contact, with the bat, if you keep following through.
 
 
 
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