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    Came across a past paper using a chemical called ferrate and I had no clue what chemical it meant , I know the formula for it now I've googled it but does anyone have a list of other names for chemical compounds we are expected to know for the exam? Any help appreciated.
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    (Original post by Hardy jacks)
    Came across a past paper using a chemical called ferrate and I had no clue what chemical it meant , I know the formula for it now I've googled it but does anyone have a list of other names for chemical compounds we are expected to know for the exam? Any help appreciated.
    That's quite a buff complex ion you know.
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    (Original post by endgametheory)
    That's quite a buff complex ion you know.
    Is there any way of working it out in exams , chemical names are such a big weakness of mine.
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    (Original post by Hardy jacks)
    Is there any way of working it out in exams , chemical names are such a big weakness of mine.
    Give me an example?
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    (Original post by endgametheory)
    Give me an example?
    Aqueous sodium ferrate(VI) is a very powerful oxidising agent. (i) predict what you would see when aqueous sodium ferrate(VI) is added to aqueous potassium iodide. Explain your answer.
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    (Original post by Hardy jacks)
    Aqueous sodium ferrate(VI) is a very powerful oxidising agent. (i) predict what you would see when aqueous sodium ferrate(VI) is added to aqueous potassium iodide. Explain your answer.
    Not a clue mate, what exam board is this?
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    (Original post by endgametheory)
    Not a clue mate, what exam board is this?
    I am with you on that, OCR
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    (Original post by Hardy jacks)
    I am with you on that, OCR
    Salters? or OCR-A?
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    (Original post by Hardy jacks)
    Came across a past paper using a chemical called ferrate and I had no clue what chemical it meant , I know the formula for it now I've googled it but does anyone have a list of other names for chemical compounds we are expected to know for the exam? Any help appreciated.
    you are unlikely to run into anything TOO foreign; you could have worked out what "ferrate" means using the general knowledge you're expected to have that ferrate is the latin for (negative) iron ions. similarly, copper ions can be "cuprate", lead "plumbate", chromium "chromate"..

    notice the clues in the shortened names of elements in the periodic table. Iron is "Fe", therefore "ferrate" or "ferrous" refers to iron. Lead is "Pb", hence "plumbate".
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    (Original post by endgametheory)
    Salters? or OCR-A?
    OCR A 😬
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    (Original post by thermometer)
    you are unlikely to run into anything TOO foreign; you could have worked out what "ferrate" means by the general knowledge you're expected to have that ferrate is the latin (I think) for iron. similarly, copper ions can be "cuprate", lead "plumbate", chromium "chromate"..

    notice the clues in the shortened names of elements in the periodic table. Iron is "Fe", therefore "ferrate" or "ferrous" refers to iron. Lead is "Pb", hence "plumbate".
    Wow nice post! I never thought of it like that, ah I'm so brain dead nowadays.
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    (Original post by Hardy jacks)
    OCR A 😬
    AH same man, I haven't even fully looked at transition metals yet, Im really sorry i couldn't help you out!

    Are you by any chance resitting any paper for chem?
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    (Original post by Hardy jacks)
    Aqueous sodium ferrate(VI) is a very powerful oxidising agent. (i) predict what you would see when aqueous sodium ferrate(VI) is added to aqueous potassium iodide. Explain your answer.
    hmm never heard of ferrate before but halides are used as reducing agents and iodine is the strongest reducing agent out of the lot so i would expect a powerful oxidising agent to oxidise the I- ion to I2 Which has a black/brown colour i think (theres prob more visible stuff that i cant remember)
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    (Original post by thermometer)
    you are unlikely to run into anything TOO foreign; you could have worked out what "ferrate" means by the general knowledge you're expected to have that ferrate is the latin (I think) for iron. similarly, copper ions can be "cuprate", lead "plumbate", chromium "chromate"..

    notice the clues in the shortened names of elements in the periodic table. Iron is "Fe", therefore "ferrate" or "ferrous" refers to iron. Lead is "Pb", hence "plumbate".
    Ahh that makes so much sense! I'm so grateful , I've just found out ate means an oxidation number greater and ite means an oxidation number lesser and nitrate is +5 whereas nitrogen is +3 , so I'm guessing ate/ite are just vague terms?
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    (Original post by GO97)
    hmm never heard of ferrate before but halides are used as reducing agents and iodine is the strongest reducing agent out of the lot so i would expect a powerful oxidising agent to oxidise the I- ion to I2 Which has a black/brown colour i think (theres prob more visible stuff that i cant remember)
    That makes so much sense! I just checked the answer and you are correct but it also adds Fe2+ which is green /fe3+ which is yellow/orange any guesses as to why this happens? When oxidation occurs is everything just breaking down??
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    (Original post by Hardy jacks)
    Ahh that makes so much sense! I'm so grateful , I've just found out ate means an oxidation number greater and ite means an oxidation number lesser and nitrate is +5 whereas nitrogen is +3 , so I'm guessing ate/ite are just vague terms?
    Glad it helped, I should also specify sorry that the latin for iron is "ferrum" so "ferrate" just refers to an iron ion-complex containing oxygen. More examples of ion names are stannate (tin; notice it's labelled Sn on the periodic table), aurate (gold; Au), and argentate (silver; Ag).

    As far as I'm aware, this usually applies to negatively charged ion complexes only, not positive ones.
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    (Original post by endgametheory)
    AH same man, I haven't even fully looked at transition metals yet, Im really sorry i couldn't help you out!

    Are you by any chance resitting any paper for chem?
    Yes I am -CER , and thanks anyway it's kind of reassuring when someone else doesn't know the answer haha
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    (Original post by thermometer)
    Glad it helped, I should also specify sorry that the latin for iron is "ferrum" so "ferrate" just refers to an iron ion-complex containing oxygen. More examples of ion names are stannate (tin; notice it's labelled Sn on the periodic table), aurate (gold; Au), and argentate (silver; Ag).

    As far as I'm aware, this usually applies to negatively charged ion complexes only, not positive ones.
    Ahh is it possible that we're able to presume if a chemical name ends in "ate" it's bonded to oxygen or is that too presumptuous?
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    (Original post by Hardy jacks)
    Ahh is it possible that we're able to presume if a chemical name ends in "ate" it's bonded to oxygen or is that too presumptuous?
    nope, its correct to think of it like that
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    (Original post by Hardy jacks)
    Ahh is it possible that we're able to presume if a chemical name ends in "ate" it's bonded to oxygen or is that too presumptuous?
    That is not true in all cases. For example, the hexachlorostannate ion has the formula SnCl62−. because it is overall negative, we use "stannate" instead of "tin". if it were a positive ion, it would be "tin" instead of "stannate". latin names are usually only used when the complex is overall negative.
 
 
 
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