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    I'm struggling to decide on which university to put as my firm choice. I liked the look of both unis for the Social Work course but both have positives and negatives about them. I want somewhere I will feel part of a community, have fun, gain a respected degree and somewhere that has a good reputation for when applying to jobs in the future. Anyone have any thoughts on this/ these universities?
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    Hi!

    I'm Rob, a second year civil engineer.

    Sadly I personally can't comment on your course or Lancaster, as I have no knowledge of either. I can however tell you a little about Bath and Bath Uni, which will hopefully be some food for thought.

    Bath Uni is a relatively small campus uni. This means that it's like a mini town all on one site! We have a Co-Op style shop, a couple of banks, coffee shops, a library, sports faculties, a nightclub, and much more, all in one place. In your first year, you will probably also be living on campus, which will be about a 5 minute walk to anything you need on campus. There are many other campus universities but there are also many city universities, where all the building are spread over the city. This is a very important thing to think about. Being on a campus can be great - it is pretty busy and has a good atmosphere. You will be surrounded by other students and gives quite a community feel. However, some people do find it can be a bit claustrophobic, but a trip into town is just a 10 minute bus journey away!

    The city of Bath it's self is very beautiful and is pretty touristy. This does mean it is relatively expensive, but the architecture and history is one of the best in the country.

    Bath uni also has a large number of sports clubs and societies with fantastic sports facilities, if this is something you are interested in. The first year accommodation is typical student accommodation which will be comparable to every other university. Personally I wouldn't make your decision based on this.

    Hopefully I have given you a rough summary of Bath Uni. I am sure I have missed off loads, so feel free to come back to me with any questions!

    Best of luck with your decision.

    Rob



    (Original post by Churmy)
    I'm struggling to decide on which university to put as my firm choice. I liked the look of both unis for the Social Work course but both have positives and negatives about them. I want somewhere I will feel part of a community, have fun, gain a respected degree and somewhere that has a good reputation for when applying to jobs in the future. Anyone have any thoughts on this/ these universities?
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    Hi Rob!

    Thank you for telling me a bit about the University of Bath... would you recommend the university itself? Are there any negative aspects of studying there I might need to think about?

    It does look like a really nice uni and has a good reputation which is one of the reasons why I decided to apply there. What are the facilities like there? Bath itself, I love, I've been there before and really liked the city and the history of it. Does it ever get boring being in a small campus university? I prefer campus unis as it has more of a community feel but I'm just not sure if it might get a bit boring after a while.

    Thanks for your reply,
    Ryan





    (Original post by University Of Bath)
    Hi!

    I'm Rob, a second year civil engineer.

    Sadly I personally can't comment on your course or Lancaster, as I have no knowledge of either. I can however tell you a little about Bath and Bath Uni, which will hopefully be some food for thought.

    Bath Uni is a relatively small campus uni. This means that it's like a mini town all on one site! We have a Co-Op style shop, a couple of banks, coffee shops, a library, sports faculties, a nightclub, and much more, all in one place. In your first year, you will probably also be living on campus, which will be about a 5 minute walk to anything you need on campus. There are many other campus universities but there are also many city universities, where all the building are spread over the city. This is a very important thing to think about. Being on a campus can be great - it is pretty busy and has a good atmosphere. You will be surrounded by other students and gives quite a community feel. However, some people do find it can be a bit claustrophobic, but a trip into town is just a 10 minute bus journey away!

    The city of Bath it's self is very beautiful and is pretty touristy. This does mean it is relatively expensive, but the architecture and history is one of the best in the country.

    Bath uni also has a large number of sports clubs and societies with fantastic sports facilities, if this is something you are interested in. The first year accommodation is typical student accommodation which will be comparable to every other university. Personally I wouldn't make your decision based on this.

    Hopefully I have given you a rough summary of Bath Uni. I am sure I have missed off loads, so feel free to come back to me with any questions!

    Best of luck with your decision.

    Rob
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    Hello! I have received offers from both Lancaster and Bath also, and I am too struggling to make up my mind! Yes i have the same concerns regarding there being enough to do on a campus based uni?
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    (Original post by Churmy)
    Hi Rob!

    Thank you for telling me a bit about the University of Bath... would you recommend the university itself? Are there any negative aspects of studying there I might need to think about?

    It does look like a really nice uni and has a good reputation which is one of the reasons why I decided to apply there. What are the facilities like there? Bath itself, I love, I've been there before and really liked the city and the history of it. Does it ever get boring being in a small campus university? I prefer campus unis as it has more of a community feel but I'm just not sure if it might get a bit boring after a while.

    Thanks for your reply,
    Ryan
    (Original post by bethwills9)
    Hello! I have received offers from both Lancaster and Bath also, and I am too struggling to make up my mind! Yes i have the same concerns regarding there being enough to do on a campus based uni?
    Hi there!

    I'm Chris, a first year Computer Science student here at Bath.

    In my time here I've grown to love the place. It definitely has flaws sometimes as with every university, but the results in recent student satisfaction surveys speak for themselves!

    I love the campus lifestyle idea for first year as it really helped me transition into university life. There's great facilities on campus - the Sports Training Village (http://www.teambath.com), plenty of restaurants, shops, the library, Edge Theatre, and School of Management. I've never really found it boring being on campus, however I regularly take the bus into the city with friends or for work - it's a £1.80 day ticket. Plus, it's a definite bonus being close to your lecture halls in the morning!
    For more info on campus facilities: http://www.bath.ac.uk/about/campus/

    The city is so clean and picturesque, which is one of the main reasons I applied here. It makes a huge difference living in such a nice environment. I'm looking forward to exploring more of Bath city next year when I move into private housing.

    Transport links at Bath are great. Buses are regular and take you down the station, situated next to the city centre with all the shops (not far from the Abbey and Roman Baths). I frequently get the return train to Bristol for just under £5 to explore another city and get out for the day. As a Bath student, you can get heavily discounted National Express coach tickets. I often get a weekend return trip to London for just £12.

    If you want to find out more about life at Bath, I really would recommend looking at the student blogs that have been put together by students such as myself.
    (They can be found here: http://blogs.bath.ac.uk/students/).

    The main point I'm making is: don't let ling on campus restrict you. It's not an isolated environment unless you make it out to be!

    Hope this helps! Feel free to get in touch if you have any further questions.

    Chris
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    (Original post by University Of Bath)
    Hi there!

    I'm Chris, a first year Computer Science student here at Bath.

    In my time here I've grown to love the place. It definitely has flaws sometimes as with every university, but the results in recent student satisfaction surveys speak for themselves!

    I love the campus lifestyle idea for first year as it really helped me transition into university life. There's great facilities on campus - the Sports Training Village (http://www.teambath.com), plenty of restaurants, shops, the library, Edge Theatre, and School of Management. I've never really found it boring being on campus, however I regularly take the bus into the city with friends or for work - it's a £1.80 day ticket. Plus, it's a definite bonus being close to your lecture halls in the morning!
    For more info on campus facilities: http://www.bath.ac.uk/about/campus/

    The city is so clean and picturesque, which is one of the main reasons I applied here. It makes a huge difference living in such a nice environment. I'm looking forward to exploring more of Bath city next year when I move into private housing.

    Transport links at Bath are great. Buses are regular and take you down the station, situated next to the city centre with all the shops (not far from the Abbey and Roman Baths). I frequently get the return train to Bristol for just under £5 to explore another city and get out for the day. As a Bath student, you can get heavily discounted National Express coach tickets. I often get a weekend return trip to London for just £12.

    If you want to find out more about life at Bath, I really would recommend looking at the student blogs that have been put together by students such as myself.
    (They can be found here: http://blogs.bath.ac.uk/students/).

    The main point I'm making is: don't let ling on campus restrict you. It's not an isolated environment unless you make it out to be!

    Hope this helps! Feel free to get in touch if you have any further questions.

    Chris
    Hello, thank you so much for your reply! How do you find the university itself? What would you say are the main negatives, are you pleased you chose to go there? Also, regarding nightlife, how do you find that? Thank you
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    (Original post by bethwills9)
    Hello, thank you so much for your reply! How do you find the university itself? What would you say are the main negatives, are you pleased you chose to go there? Also, regarding nightlife, how do you find that? Thank you
    Hi Beth,

    I'm Hayden, a first year International Management student here at the University of Bath. I understand that you sent your question to Chris, however to save you waiting I will answer it for you!

    How do I find the University itself? From an academic perspective I believe that the University of Bath is great, for my course the class sizes are relatively small, lecturers have strong subject knowledge and apply their research to the way in which we are taught. As a place to live and work there is a great sense of community and a very relaxed feel to the campus, over the exam period for example there was less panic when compared to school exams!

    What are the main negatives? One negative to me is that around the central parts of the campus some of the buildings look quite dated from the outside, this is different to a lot of universities that are traditionally really old or very modern. Having said that, recent developments such as the Edge, East building, Quads and Chancellors Building are very modern. Inside the buildings that aren't so attractive from the outside such as Norwood they are fine inside, the rooms tend to be fully equipped and fresh, it certainly shouldn't affect your experience!

    What is the nightlife like? This is a topic that a lot of people asking questions on the Student Room have heard some stereotypes that nightlife in Bath is poor, I would disagree. We have two events hosted on campus every week (Score and Klass), this is convenient for going out as it is right on your doorstep. There is always something happening in Bath too, you would never go into Bath and find nothing to do. Being a smaller city the nightlife isn't as 'large' as it is in some other big cities, however Bristol isn't too far away, I personally have never felt the need to go there.

    I hope that answers your questions!

    Hayden
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    (Original post by University Of Bath)
    Hi Beth,

    I'm Hayden, a first year International Management student here at the University of Bath. I understand that you sent your question to Chris, however to save you waiting I will answer it for you!

    How do I find the University itself? From an academic perspective I believe that the University of Bath is great, for my course the class sizes are relatively small, lecturers have strong subject knowledge and apply their research to the way in which we are taught. As a place to live and work there is a great sense of community and a very relaxed feel to the campus, over the exam period for example there was less panic when compared to school exams!

    What are the main negatives? One negative to me is that around the central parts of the campus some of the buildings look quite dated from the outside, this is different to a lot of universities that are traditionally really old or very modern. Having said that, recent developments such as the Edge, East building, Quads and Chancellors Building are very modern. Inside the buildings that aren't so attractive from the outside such as Norwood they are fine inside, the rooms tend to be fully equipped and fresh, it certainly shouldn't affect your experience!

    What is the nightlife like? This is a topic that a lot of people asking questions on the Student Room have heard some stereotypes that nightlife in Bath is poor, I would disagree. We have two events hosted on campus every week (Score and Klass), this is convenient for going out as it is right on your doorstep. There is always something happening in Bath too, you would never go into Bath and find nothing to do. Being a smaller city the nightlife isn't as 'large' as it is in some other big cities, however Bristol isn't too far away, I personally have never felt the need to go there.

    I hope that answers your questions!

    Hayden
    Hello, thank you very much! That was really helpful!
    I am studying Business Administration in September hopefully if I get the grades and I was just wondering what you thought of the business school itself? Do you like it? What are the lectures like? Do you regret choosing Bath for any reason?
    I am attending an offer holder day on the 5th March, is there anything I should look for specifically or anything you suggest I ask/ consider in particular?
    Thank you
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    Hi Beth,

    Sorry for yet another change of respondent! I am Rob, a second year civil engineer. Hayden probably won't see your message for about a week so I thought I'd reply to the bits I can.

    In terms of what specifically to look for/do at your offer holder day, I would suggest you just have the best time you can and are as inquisitive as possible. Ask as many questions as you can and find out about everything! This doesn't mean you'll remember it, but the more you know, the easier it will be to make a decision. You'll probably have a tour and maybe do some group work. Try not to be shy and just get involved and see what the uni is like. This will all help you make your decision.

    Personally I don't regret choosing bath at all. I really do like it here. As said above I can't comment on your course as I don't know, but lectures are either 50 or 1h50 minutes long (usually with a break) and can be a mix of tutorials, seminars and lectures depending on your course.

    I hope that helps. Feel free to quote again.

    Rob


    (Original post by bethwills9)
    Hello, thank you very much! That was really helpful!
    I am studying Business Administration in September hopefully if I get the grades and I was just wondering what you thought of the business school itself? Do you like it? What are the lectures like? Do you regret choosing Bath for any reason?
    I am attending an offer holder day on the 5th March, is there anything I should look for specifically or anything you suggest I ask/ consider in particular?
    Thank you
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    Bath>Lancaster.
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    (Original post by University Of Bath)
    Hi there!

    I'm Chris, a first year Computer Science student here at Bath.

    In my time here I've grown to love the place. It definitely has flaws sometimes as with every university, but the results in recent student satisfaction surveys speak for themselves!

    I love the campus lifestyle idea for first year as it really helped me transition into university life. There's great facilities on campus - the Sports Training Village (http://www.teambath.com), plenty of restaurants, shops, the library, Edge Theatre, and School of Management. I've never really found it boring being on campus, however I regularly take the bus into the city with friends or for work - it's a £1.80 day ticket. Plus, it's a definite bonus being close to your lecture halls in the morning!
    For more info on campus facilities: http://www.bath.ac.uk/about/campus/

    The city is so clean and picturesque, which is one of the main reasons I applied here. It makes a huge difference living in such a nice environment. I'm looking forward to exploring more of Bath city next year when I move into private housing.

    Transport links at Bath are great. Buses are regular and take you down the station, situated next to the city centre with all the shops (not far from the Abbey and Roman Baths). I frequently get the return train to Bristol for just under £5 to explore another city and get out for the day. As a Bath student, you can get heavily discounted National Express coach tickets. I often get a weekend return trip to London for just £12.

    If you want to find out more about life at Bath, I really would recommend looking at the student blogs that have been put together by students such as myself.
    (They can be found here: http://blogs.bath.ac.uk/students/).

    The main point I'm making is: don't let ling on campus restrict you. It's not an isolated environment unless you make it out to be!

    Hope this helps! Feel free to get in touch if you have any further questions.

    Chris
    Could you comment on the Comp Science program at Bath? How are you feeling about it, what you like and dislike etc?

    Also I really wanted to try for these year in industry, but not sure if me being Canadian would hinder finding a year long job in the UK or use the UK based resources the uni would probably provide for students in that program (or as you people say programme)
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    Hi,

    I'm Rob, a second year civil engineer.

    Chris may not see your message until next week, so I thought I'd help with the bits I can. Hopefully he'll pick it up next week, if he doesn't, ask again on his thread.

    I am also in the process of applying for placements. The placement team at the uni will be able to give assistance with finding jobs, and will probably be able to provide a list of possible companies. They will probably also be able to help with CVs and cover letters. The jobs that they suggest will probably be in the UK (this is certainly the case for engineering). The reason for this is that UK companies are used to the year long placements and have the correct insurance and schemes in place. This doesn't mean you can't find your own placement and you may be able to find one in Canada that the placement team will be OK with. To my knowledge the only extra complication that non home students have is paperwork, visas etc. Obviously you will need to have the right to work in the UK if you are doing so. Sadly I have no knowledge on any of the paperwork required. Perhaps there will be other international students who can make a comment on this.

    Hope that partly helps. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask.

    Rob



    (Original post by pepperino)
    Could you comment on the Comp Science program at Bath? How are you feeling about it, what you like and dislike etc?

    Also I really wanted to try for these year in industry, but not sure if me being Canadian would hinder finding a year long job in the UK or use the UK based resources the uni would probably provide for students in that program (or as you people say programme)
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    (Original post by University Of Bath)
    Hi,

    I'm Rob, a second year civil engineer.

    Chris may not see your message until next week, so I thought I'd help with the bits I can. Hopefully he'll pick it up next week, if he doesn't, ask again on his thread.

    I am also in the process of applying for placements. The placement team at the uni will be able to give assistance with finding jobs, and will probably be able to provide a list of possible companies. They will probably also be able to help with CVs and cover letters. The jobs that they suggest will probably be in the UK (this is certainly the case for engineering). The reason for this is that UK companies are used to the year long placements and have the correct insurance and schemes in place. This doesn't mean you can't find your own placement and you may be able to find one in Canada that the placement team will be OK with. To my knowledge the only extra complication that non home students have is paperwork, visas etc. Obviously you will need to have the right to work in the UK if you are doing so. Sadly I have no knowledge on any of the paperwork required. Perhaps there will be other international students who can make a comment on this.

    Hope that partly helps. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask.

    Rob
    Ok thanks Rob. I wonder what Chris has to say as well.
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    (Original post by pepperino)
    Could you comment on the Comp Science program at Bath? How are you feeling about it, what you like and dislike etc?

    Also I really wanted to try for these year in industry, but not sure if me being Canadian would hinder finding a year long job in the UK or use the UK based resources the uni would probably provide for students in that program (or as you people say programme)
    Hi there!

    Chris here, a first year Computer Science student. With Easter holidays approaching on Friday, I'm about halfway through my second semester of first year, so I can certainly cast an opinion on the course to far!

    I've certainly enjoyed it so far. It's been much more varied than I had anticipated, which is a bonus. I did Computing A level which was what sparked my interest in the subject and so far it has consisted of some extension of A level knowledge, as well as new content.

    I can comment on some of the modules I've done/am doing at the moment:
    Spoiler:
    Show

    CM10194: Systems Architecture 1
    Layers and abstractions of modern computer systems architectures from machine level upwards. Representations, storage, management and transmission of data on the computer and management of resources.

    CM10196: Discrete Mathematics for Computation
    Propositional and predicate calculus (including basic logic).
    Sets and Relations Mappings and functions (e.g., injections, surjections, bijections).
    Elementary number theory (e.g. prime numbers, induction and modular arithmetic, rational numbers).

    CM10227: Principles of Programming 1
    Introduction to C. Sequence, selection, iteration and recursion. Introduction to object-oriented development. Objects, classes, inheritance and polymorphism. Comparison of procedural and object programming. Introductions to abstract data types. Data Organisation: Basic data structures: lists, stacks and queues

    CM10251: Computing as a Science and Engineering Discipline
    Systems engineering and design methods, such as Object/Class diagrams, UML, iterative software development, code reuse and software maintenance.
    Testing and debugging: unit testing, tracing by hand, print statements, etc.

    CM10195: Systems Architecture 2:
    Operating systems and network interaction. Understanding storage, management and transmission of data on the computer and management of resources.

    CM10197: Analytical Mathematics for Computation:
    Linear Algebra elementary matrices and vectors, Gaussian elimination, inverses, determinants, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, equations of lines and planes in space. Series: sequences and series, convergence, real numbers, derivatives, absolute convergence, comparison and integral tests, Taylor/Maclaurin series.

    You can find out more here: http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/201...oglist-ug.html

    There is coursework of some kind in every unit ranging from programming tasks to essays to group projects. I like the variety.

    I found the first maths unit (CM10196) quite abstract and difficult to understand the later content at first but got the hang of it soon enough! CM10251 is a year long module and was interesting to discover the different methods of designing software. Personally, the programming modules have been most interesting as they have introduced us to C and Java development in quite a head-first practical way which has meant people are all at more or less the same level by Christmas.

    As a UK student like Rob, I don't know too much about the process for International students. The placement team should be able to give assistance and are likely to be UK-based. As Rob said, paperwork and visas might just add an extra step to the application. If you get no reply from international students on here, it might be worth contacting the admissions team on +44 (0)1225 383019 or [email protected].

    Hope this helps!

    Chris
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    (Original post by University Of Bath)
    Hi there!

    Chris here, a first year Computer Science student. With Easter holidays approaching on Friday, I'm about halfway through my second semester of first year, so I can certainly cast an opinion on the course to far!

    I've certainly enjoyed it so far. It's been much more varied than I had anticipated, which is a bonus. I did Computing A level which was what sparked my interest in the subject and so far it has consisted of some extension of A level knowledge, as well as new content.

    I can comment on some of the modules I've done/am doing at the moment:
    Spoiler:
    Show

    CM10194: Systems Architecture 1
    Layers and abstractions of modern computer systems architectures from machine level upwards. Representations, storage, management and transmission of data on the computer and management of resources.

    CM10196: Discrete Mathematics for Computation
    Propositional and predicate calculus (including basic logic).
    Sets and Relations Mappings and functions (e.g., injections, surjections, bijections).
    Elementary number theory (e.g. prime numbers, induction and modular arithmetic, rational numbers).

    CM10227: Principles of Programming 1
    Introduction to C. Sequence, selection, iteration and recursion. Introduction to object-oriented development. Objects, classes, inheritance and polymorphism. Comparison of procedural and object programming. Introductions to abstract data types. Data Organisation: Basic data structures: lists, stacks and queues

    CM10251: Computing as a Science and Engineering Discipline
    Systems engineering and design methods, such as Object/Class diagrams, UML, iterative software development, code reuse and software maintenance.
    Testing and debugging: unit testing, tracing by hand, print statements, etc.

    CM10195: Systems Architecture 2:
    Operating systems and network interaction. Understanding storage, management and transmission of data on the computer and management of resources.

    CM10197: Analytical Mathematics for Computation:
    Linear Algebra elementary matrices and vectors, Gaussian elimination, inverses, determinants, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, equations of lines and planes in space. Series: sequences and series, convergence, real numbers, derivatives, absolute convergence, comparison and integral tests, Taylor/Maclaurin series.
    You can find out more here: http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/201...oglist-ug.html

    There is coursework of some kind in every unit ranging from programming tasks to essays to group projects. I like the variety.

    I found the first maths unit (CM10196) quite abstract and difficult to understand the later content at first but got the hang of it soon enough! CM10251 is a year long module and was interesting to discover the different methods of designing software. Personally, the programming modules have been most interesting as they have introduced us to C and Java development in quite a head-first practical way which has meant people are all at more or less the same level by Christmas.

    As a UK student like Rob, I don't know too much about the process for International students. The placement team should be able to give assistance and are likely to be UK-based. As Rob said, paperwork and visas might just add an extra step to the application. If you get no reply from international students on here, it might be worth contacting the admissions team on +44 (0)1225 383019 or [email protected].

    Hope this helps!

    Chris
    So it's 3-4 modules per semester if I'm seeing that correctly.

    Hey another question - what do first compsci majors do in their first summer after their first year? Besides vacation time, do some of them have a chance to start working, like going in first year internship programs? Or does such a thing not exist?

    By the way, when you're doing the placement and are on the stage of searching for one, you give your resume/cv and apply to whatever you want right?

    I was wondering though, if the placements require you to have experience before, doesn't that make it tricky? Or do they know that it is your first job so you don't have any experience (besides maybe volunteering, projects from module, or something of the sort).
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    (Original post by pepperino)
    So it's 3-4 modules per semester if I'm seeing that correctly.

    Hey another question - what do first compsci majors do in their first summer after their first year? Besides vacation time, do some of them have a chance to start working, like going in first year internship programs? Or does such a thing not exist?

    By the way, when you're doing the placement and are on the stage of searching for one, you give your resume/cv and apply to whatever you want right?

    I was wondering though, if the placements require you to have experience before, doesn't that make it tricky? Or do they know that it is your first job so you don't have any experience (besides maybe volunteering, projects from module, or something of the sort).
    Hi there!

    Yes, so I took 3 exams during first semester and I'll have 4 this semester (because CM10251 Computing as a Science and Engineering Discipline is a year-long module).

    In your first summer, you may apply for insight programmes or even internships aimed at first year undergraduates. This is by no means compulsory, but it does gain you useful experience.

    I haven't yet reached the stage of placement applications (I'll be looking into companies and doing research/writing my CV over summer) because most applications open in October 2016. However, I am led to believe that you are free to apply wherever you want, with a lot of assistance from the placement co-ordinators in giving you skills to aid in your applications.

    I have heard repeatedly so that, as it is likely to be your first job, they do not assume prior knowledge and provide all training required.

    Hope this helps!

    Chris
 
 
 
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