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    Hi,

    A few weeks ago, I selected Biology, Chemistry, Maths, and Physics for my A-Levels, but I have a nagging feeling that I should be doing Computing.

    Initially, I had thrown out the idea of Computing; it's not overly well-considered, so I decided to stick with facilitating subjects. After deliberating between English Literature and Physics and choosing the latter, however, the thought in the back of my mind made its way forwards. I've always loved and 'had a way with' computers - it has always been me who fixes the classroom sound system when it fails (again)! Both Physics and Computing appeal equally to me, and since I am more interested in Life Sciences (hopefully Medicine), neither is of particular importance to my future.

    Out of fascination, I will probably pursue whichever subject I don't take outside of school (I wouldn't take an exam, just learn for learning's sake), so I guess my question is this: which is the most difficult to pursue without the help and guidance of a teacher/other students? Which would be the easiest to pursue alone? Right now, I'm thinking that I should swap to do Computing at school and Physics at home, as my present experience in Computing involves lots of collaboration between people in my class for coursework and programming, but that is up to be changed if anyone with experience of the two courses thinks otherwise!

    My Physics exam board would be AQA and my Computing exam board would be OCR, both on the new specifications.

    Thanks in advance!
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    No one needs A level Computing to do Computer Science at university. In fact the top universities would prefer you didn't if it means you'd do maths and further maths combo.
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    (Original post by pvaz6965)
    No one needs A level Computing to do Computer Science at university. In fact the top universities would prefer you didn't if it means you'd do maths and further maths combo.
    Thanks for replying! ☺

    I did think about this, but I don't feel that Further Maths is right for me. I am lucky enough to be good at Maths and enjoy it, but I do not believe that Further Maths would be possible. This would, of course, make University level Computer Science, Engineering, and Physics harder, but I guess I can't do everything!
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    (Original post by SummerStrawberry)
    Thanks for replying! ☺

    I did think about this, but I don't feel that Further Maths is right for me. I am lucky enough to be good at Maths and enjoy it, but I do not believe that Further Maths would be possible. This would, of course, make University level Computer Science, Engineering, and Physics harder, but I guess I can't do everything!
    Thing is the mathematics most useful in computer science is primarily in the further maths syllabus. Especially the linear algebra (matrices, eigenvectors/values).
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    (Original post by SummerStrawberry)
    Hi,

    A few weeks ago, I selected Biology, Chemistry, Maths, and Physics for my A-Levels, but I have a nagging feeling that I should be doing Computing.

    Initially, I had thrown out the idea of Computing; it's not overly well-considered, so I decided to stick with facilitating subjects. After deliberating between English Literature and Physics and choosing the latter, however, the thought in the back of my mind made its way forwards. I've always loved and 'had a way with' computers - it has always been me who fixes the classroom sound system when it fails (again)! Both Physics and Computing appeal equally to me, and since I am more interested in Life Sciences (hopefully Medicine), neither is of particular importance to my future.

    Out of fascination, I will probably pursue whichever subject I don't take outside of school (I wouldn't take an exam, just learn for learning's sake), so I guess my question is this: which is the most difficult to pursue without the help and guidance of a teacher/other students? Which would be the easiest to pursue alone? Right now, I'm thinking that I should swap to do Computing at school and Physics at home, as my present experience in Computing involves lots of collaboration between people in my class for coursework and programming, but that is up to be changed if anyone with experience of the two courses thinks otherwise!

    My Physics exam board would be AQA and my Computing exam board would be OCR, both on the new specifications.

    Thanks in advance!
    The new computer science syllabus is much more respected by universities. There's still a small number of places that prefer other subjects but if you think you can do well at computeibg A level it won't prevent you getting a place at even the most selective of universities http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/faq/ (although if you're looking at Cambridge the advice about clarifying the situation for each college is worth following).
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    I'm not particularly interested in Computer Science at University; I'm looking more at Life Sciences, particularly Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

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    (Original post by SummerStrawberry)
    I'm not particularly interested in Computer Science at University; I'm looking more at Life Sciences, particularly Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

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    Sorry I missed that in your original post (and just wanted to correct the rumour spreading happening in the other replies)

    switching physics for computing is completely up to you. Neither will give you an advantage for life science/med. just pick whichever you think you'll enjoy most and get the best grades in.
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    No problem!

    That's the thing: I love both subjects equally! Is there a way in which I can find out which topics are covered in the A-Level, so that I can find out which is of greatest interest to me overall?

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    (Original post by SummerStrawberry)
    No problem!

    That's the thing: I love both subjects equally! Is there a way in which I can find out which topics are covered in the A-Level, so that I can find out which is of greatest interest to me overall?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Do you know which exam board your school is using for each? The exam board websites will have specifications and past/sample papers available which should give you an idea of topics (and the way the exams work).
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    Thanks! I'll take a look!

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