Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Getting along with people from different ethnic groups Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Do you generally find it easier to get along / develop friendships with certain ethnic groups (excluding your own) over others? Or do you consider yourself an all-rounder who has the ability to build rapport and forge strong friendships regardless of ethnic background?

    I will admit that I generally find it much easier to get along with some ethnic groups over others. I definitely notice a disconnect with people from the ethnic groups that I find difficult to get along with.

    What about you? Share your experiences.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    I have had friends of all ethnic groups and I don't find it difficult in talking to certain groups over others. I think this is due to the fact I was able to interact with a variety of ethnic groups over my school years making it easier for me now.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I don't really think about it, I've had friends from multiple ethnic groups
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    Yes, absolutely As a matter of fact, 99% of my friends aren't from the same/similar ethnic group(s)

    To be honest, I was presented with very few opportunities to interact with people from similar backgrounds due to the area I was brought up in
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    I don't really have a consistently defined ethnic group but even when it comes to nationality, the only people I know from my country in the UK are also related to me, so I have no choice really. My friendship group is quite diverse although the vast majority as White British, there have also been other Europeans, East Asians and South Asians.

    I have more acquaintanceships with Pakistani/British Pakistanis, however I don't know any who I would meet up with in a situation I wasn't forced to, I think it's generally that they don't drink or go to the same clubs as me so I never see them out.

    But most of my friends no matter the ethnicity tend to be very typically British in their behaviours, so I think its more background than ethnicity.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    I get along very well with the south-asian ethnicity as I feel like we have much more in common and you can take part in banter that Caucasians may not find funny or they may find offensive which is understandable.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RivalPlayer)
    Do you generally find it easier to get along / develop friendships with certain ethnic groups (excluding your own) over others? Or do you consider yourself an all-rounder who has the ability to build rapport and forge strong friendships regardless of ethnic background?

    I will admit that I generally find it much easier to get along with some ethnic groups over others. I definitely notice a disconnect with people from the ethnic groups that I find difficult to get along with.

    What about you? Share your experiences.
    The ethnic group does not matter, only their interests and at times their culture. When someone is very cultural but I am not familiar with their culture then it's difficult to follow. For an example my former neighbour was extremely cultural and only ever listened to Bhangra music, watched Bollywood movies and wore traditional clothing. She was a nice girl but whenever I went over we didn't have much to speak about because she was not very familiar my interests and I wasn't very familiar with hers except for the one time when I watched a Bollywood movie with her. If I had more experience with her culture or she was more Westernised then it would have been easy.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Very easily
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RivalPlayer)
    Do you generally find it easier to get along / develop friendships with certain ethnic groups (excluding your own) over others? Or do you consider yourself an all-rounder who has the ability to build rapport and forge strong friendships regardless of ethnic background?

    I will admit that I generally find it much easier to get along with some ethnic groups over others. I definitely notice a disconnect with people from the ethnic groups that I find difficult to get along with.

    What about you? Share your experiences.
    It's all been the same to me.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WBZ144)
    The ethnic group does not matter, only their interests and at times their culture. When someone is very cultural but I am not familiar with their culture then it's difficult to follow. For an example my former neighbour was extremely cultural and only ever listened to Bhangra music, watched Bollywood movies and wore traditional clothing. She was a nice girl but whenever I went over we didn't have much to speak about because she was not very familiar my interests and I wasn't very familiar with hers except for the one time when I watched a Bollywood movie with her. If I had more experience with her culture or she was more Westernised then it would have been easy.
    Don't you think that culture is more likely to be tied to ethnicity these days? I think the scenario you describe (people opting to stay in their cultural zone instead of absorbing Western cultural artifacts) is far more common in 2016 than ever before.

    For example, when was the last time you met a similarly-aged Chinese or Pakistani person that kept up with English pop culture to the point where you could fondly reminisce over old British TV programmes or music? I know that I haven't.

    I remember when I used to go around the houses of my Chinese friends, the TV would only be running Chinese language films and soap operas. I introduced one of them to the UK radio station, Kiss 100. He had not heard of it despite living in London for 17 years - he had spent his whole life listening to Cantonese and Taiwanese music - by choice. And this was in the early 2000s.

    I think the cultural disconnect is more pronounced these days because it's much easier for someone to stay within their cultural domain than it was 40 years ago. These days, they don't have to watch British TV, listen to Western music or even learn English. They can be like that and still function reasonably well in society. Socialising isn't even hampered because they can just gravitate to their local established ethnic community.This is what I'm seeing in my borough - people generally stick with their own - by choice.

    I think attempting to get along is made much harder when a person chooses to not absorb anything from Western pop culture - there's just nothing to talk about - fewer grounds of commonality to build upon.
    I think a good sign that a person is well integrated in British society is when you can talk about old TV programmes or songs that used to come on the radio. It shows that they've made an effort to step outside of own culture and absorb things that were popular in mainstream Western culture.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I haven't noticed a difference between people of any ethnic make up and my ease it get along with them. As long as they are decent people I will probably get along with them.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RivalPlayer)
    Don't you think that culture is more likely to be tied to ethnicity these days? I think the scenario you describe (people opting to stay in their cultural zone instead of absorbing Western cultural artifacts) is far more common in 2016 than ever before.

    For example, when was the last time you met a similarly-aged Chinese or Pakistani person that kept up with English pop culture to the point where you could fondly reminisce over old British TV programmes or music? I know that I haven't.

    I remember when I used to go around the houses of my Chinese friends, the TV would only be running Chinese language films and soap operas. I introduced one of them to the UK radio station, Kiss 100. He had not heard of it despite living in London for 17 years - he had spent his whole life listening to Cantonese and Taiwanese music - by choice. And this was in the early 2000s.

    I think the cultural disconnect is more pronounced these days because it's much easier for someone to stay within their cultural domain than it was 40 years ago. These days, they don't have to watch British TV, listen to Western music or even learn English. They can be like that and still function reasonably well in society. Socialising isn't even hampered because they can just gravitate to their local established ethnic community.This is what I'm seeing in my borough - people generally stick with their own - by choice.

    I think attempting to get along is made much harder when a person chooses to not absorb anything from Western pop culture - there's just nothing to talk about - fewer grounds of commonality to build upon.
    I think a good sign that a person is well integrated in British society is when you can talk about old TV programmes or songs that used to come on the radio. It shows that they've made an effort to step outside of own culture and absorb things that were popular in mainstream Western culture.
    Yesterday, most Chinese and Pakistani people of my age group (18) tend to only follow British pop culture


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dinasaurus)
    Yesterday, most Chinese and Pakistani people of my age group (18) tend to only follow British pop culture


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Do you live in a major city?
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Wiki Support Team
    Never been a problem for me.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I will befriend anyone who I get along with regardless of their racial and cultural background. I don't notice a difference in the ease of forming a friendship based on ethnicity. I was brought up in one of the most diverse cities in the UK and in the world, so from a young age I was able to interact with a very diverse community.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RivalPlayer)
    Do you live in a major city?
    No, population of 190,461.

    I have friends who are Vietnamese, Indian and behaviour wise they're like stereotypical white girls, I myself am not white and wasn't born in Britain and my friends always say I am very British in behaviour.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dinasaurus)
    No, population of 190,461.

    I have friends who are Vietnamese, Indian and behaviour wise they're like stereotypical white girls, I myself am not white and wasn't born in Britain and my friends always say I am very British in behaviour.
    Oh right, maybe it's just a London thing then. I think places with smaller populations do a better job of encouraging tight knit communities to form regardless of ethnic differences.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RivalPlayer)
    Oh right, maybe it's just a London thing then. I think places with smaller populations do a better job of encouraging tight knit communities to form regardless of ethnic differences.
    I guess London has a big enough number of ethnic communities that they don't feel a need to integrate.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dinasaurus)
    I guess London has a big enough number of ethnic communities that they don't feel a need to integrate.
    Exactly, so they just end up gravitating to their respective communities since it's easier than befriending people that aren't like them.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    My town has literally 0 cultural diversity, there is about a dozen Asian people in my school of 1,500 and that's around it, the rest are white British. For me, unmeaningly I am taken aback sometimes by people from different ethnic groups. I would like to think it wouldn't impact whether I would befriend them or not, but I'm sure this is something I will encounter when I'm at university, I am looking forward to meeting more diverse people
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up salt or pepper?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.