Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    I have a physics assessment in a few days about the waves topic, and I have a problem with understanding exam questions. I understand the lessons and all but when it comes to solving past papers I get stuck on the questions including the easy ones.. Any ideas on what I can do?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Ask your teachers for help, that's what they're paid for They'll probably be a lot more forgiving of muck ups in the assessment if they know that you've tried to tackle the areas that you struggle with, too.

    If past paper questions are a struggle, perhaps start with the exercises in your textbook, or find some simpler ones online. Maybe try to find some that break down complex problems into individual steps.

    I did AS and A2 physics, and while I might be a little rusty I'm happy to have a look at any specific questions if you quote me

    Best of luck!
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    YouTube and online videos lend themselves to this well. You can pause and rewind until it clicks
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    Ask your teachers for help, that's what they're paid for They'll probably be a lot more forgiving of muck ups in the assessment if they know that you've tried to tackle the areas that you struggle with, too.

    If past paper questions are a struggle, perhaps start with the exercises in your textbook, or find some simpler ones online. Maybe try to find some that break down complex problems into individual steps.

    I did AS and A2 physics, and while I might be a little rusty I'm happy to have a look at any specific questions if you quote me

    Best of luck!
    Thank you very much, I did email my teacher and we are going to start to solve past papers as a class..
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    YouTube and online videos lend themselves to this well. You can pause and rewind until it clicks
    Yes I always watch videos when I need help but sometimes I feel as if the videos don't answer my question or don't explain it the way it should, I'll keep that in mind though. Thank you.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I ended up retaking physics because of this reason lol. This year, i've found it really useful to leave the past papers and questions until I understand the equations fully and why they are arranged in the way that they are. Sounds simple and u might think you already understand them but make sure you know everything about them, even more than what is on the spec. That helps so much, not just for calculations but for the wordy questions as well.

    For waves in particular, make sure you know all the key points and what everything means like phase difference and what have u. Also for superposition and interference learn the equations for the fundamental, first overtone, second overtone and so on. as you arnet given them in the sheet

    Last year I was getting straight Us, this year i'm on straight As.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LaylaM99)
    Yes I always watch videos when I need help but sometimes I feel as if the videos don't answer my question or don't explain it the way it should, I'll keep that in mind though. Thank you.
    Let us know which you are watching, people may have some suggestions for you as I'm sure not all videos are equal!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    Let us know which you are watching, people may have some suggestions for you as I'm sure not all videos are equal!
    Will do! Thanks
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by maximo17000)
    I ended up retaking physics because of this reason lol. This year, i've found it really useful to leave the past papers and questions until I understand the equations fully and why they are arranged in the way that they are. Sounds simple and u might think you already understand them but make sure you know everything about them, even more than what is on the spec. That helps so much, not just for calculations but for the wordy questions as well.

    For waves in particular, make sure you know all the key points and what everything means like phase difference and what have u. Also for superposition and interference learn the equations for the fundamental, first overtone, second overtone and so on. as you arnet given them in the sheet

    Last year I was getting straight Us, this year i'm on straight As.
    That is true, I'll revise over my notes first and see if I can get back and tackle the hard question! Plenty of thanks
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    The way I always approached science exams was to first read over each question and attribute a topic to it. So just write next to each question, which part of the waves topic the question is about. When you start a question, always always always write down any relevant formulae, you'll find just looking at the equations and the numbers given to you in the question will often give you a place to start. Wordy questions (I think they're called QWCs?), I'd very quickly write 3 or 4 bullet points with the information that you think the question wants you to give, so you don't miss anything out.

    Also, you can take advantage of the fact that it's an exam, so is designed to test you on most everything. You know it's gotta contain every major part of the syllabus. So if there's one question that you just can't make heads or tails of, look at all the other questions on the paper and by a process of elimination you should end up with some idea of what the question you're stuck on is about.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    The way I always approached science exams was to first read over each question and attribute a topic to it. So just write next to each question, which part of the waves topic the question is about. When you start a question, always always always write down any relevant formulae, you'll find just looking at the equations and the numbers given to you in the question will often give you a place to start. Wordy questions (I think they're called QWCs?), I'd very quickly write 3 or 4 bullet points with the information that you think the question wants you to give, so you don't miss anything out.

    Also, you can take advantage of the fact that it's an exam, so is designed to test you on most everything. You know it's gotta contain every major part of the syllabus. So if there's one question that you just can't make heads or tails of, look at all the other questions on the paper and by a process of elimination you should end up with some idea of what the question you're stuck on is about.
    I'm sorry this is a late reply, but you are absolutely right ! That is actually very helpful, I'll keep that in mind for all my exams! Thank you very much
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Waves is a bit of a huge topic. Make sure you know all of the equations you need and where they are used. If the derivations are assessed go through your notes or lectures notes and make sure you understand the derivations and can do them in an exam. If this is above A-level make sure you know all of the relevant maths(partial derivatives, complex numbers etc.). Then do lots of questions.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by morgan8002)
    Waves is a bit of a huge topic. Make sure you know all of the equations you need and where they are used. If the derivations are assessed go through your notes or lectures notes and make sure you understand the derivations and can do them in an exam. If this is above A-level make sure you know all of the relevant maths(partial derivatives, complex numbers etc.). Then do lots of questions.
    Thank you a lot xx
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: March 10, 2016
Poll
Do I go to The Streets tomorrow night?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.