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Ultimate Revision Tips Thread - Share Yours!! watch

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    :awesome: Hi everyone :awesome:

    As we come to the end of the half term, lots of people are wanting to get ahead with their revision already! However, it's only natural for a lot of you to have questions on the best ways to revise and manage your time, especially if this is your first round of major exams!



    When should I get started?
    According to our poll last year, most of you voted that the best time to get started for revision is February! It's always best to get ahead with your revision and then you don't need to cram in the last month.

    How should I manage my time? Should I make a timetable?
    Personally, I think a revision timetable is one of the ultimate methods of distraction and procrastination :mmm: While it might work for some people (in which case I would thoroughly recommend TSR's study planner), a lot of the time we have a tendency to make them too rigid, unrealistic or spend too much time making them.
    Instead, I'd recommend making a checklist at the start of every day with 3-5 things on that you want to achieve that day. With a small list rather than a massive schedule, it will look like your workload is a lot smaller, easier to manage and you'll find it easier to get motivated.

    What should I revise first?
    While you might be tempted to revise the things you enjoy first and put off the harder things, I find this technique works best:
    Name:  WP_20160218_001.jpg
Views: 2719
Size:  510.7 KB
    Make a graph for each of your subjects, and plot every topic on it. Start in the area marked '1' for your revision, and work your way through them that way.
    Make sure you go back and replot the graph once you've revised everything, to see what still needs more work!

    How do I actually revise then?!
    There's too many revision techniques to list, but the most effective things for you will depend on what kind of learner you are. If you don't already know, then take a quiz like this one and try and tailor your revision to your type.
    • Post it notes: This has to be one of my favourite methods of revision. Write key words, quotes, equations, definitions, dates, etc on post it notes (colour code them if you have different topics) and stick them on your wall where you'll see them all the time. Whenever you look at them, read them and say them outloud, and test yourself on them all the time.
    • Condense your notes:Combining both your class notes and your textbook, try to fit all of the information from each topic onto an A4 page. Then condense that down into A5. Then keep halving until you have all of the key information on a flash card sized piece of paper.
    • Flashcards: You can write essay plans, definitions and key points on flashcards, and then hole punch them and put them on a ring to keep them together and take some with you whenever you go out. While you're sat on the bus, instead of browsing the internet aimlessly, test yourself on a few flashcards!
    • Past papers: The holy grail of revision. Nothing beats replicating a real exam for practice- do a whole paper with no notes, then mark it and highlight on the mark scheme all of the marks that you missed. Go back through the paper and add corrections and additions in a different coloured pen, and make a note of the topics where you missed marks so you can look over them again.

    An alternative method from Lord Hysteria

    My Method
    Step 1: Understand
    • Study the topic to be learnt slowly
    • Make sure you understand the key points and concepts
    • Mark up the text if necessary – underline, highlight etc
    • Re-read each paragraph slowly


    GO TO STEP 2

    Step 2: Summarise
    • Now make your revision note summary
    • What is the main idea, theme, concept?
    • What are the main points? How does the logic develop?
    • Use bullet points, minds maps, patterned notes
    • Link ideas using mnemonics, mind maps, crazy stories
    • Note the title and date of the revision notes
      (E.g. Mathematics, Trigonometry, 3rd March)
    • Organise the notes carefully and keep them in a file


    This is now in your short term memory. You will forget 80% of it, if you don’t
    go to step 3. GO TO STEP 3, but first take a break.

    Step 3: Memorise

    • Take 25 minutes learning ‘bites’ with 5 min breaks
    • After each 5 min break test your self
    • Cover the original notes summary
    • Write down the main points
    • Speak it loud
    • Tell someone else
    • Repeat many times


    The material is now in your long term memory. You will forget 40% of it, if
    you don’t go to step 4. GO TO STEP 4.

    Step 4: Track/Review

    • Create a revision diary (one A4 page per day)
    • Make a revision plan for each topic
    • E.g. 1 day later, I week later, 1 month later.
    • Record this in your revision diary

    Mathematics, Trigonometry, 3rd March – 25 minutes
    Mathematics, Trigonometry, 10rd March – 15 minutes
    Mathematics, Trigonometry, 3rd April – 15 minutes
    ... and then at monthly intervals



    Bits and BobsWhere should I revise?

    Find somewhere quiet and comfy with a good light. It is important that it is quiet as it is the best way to concentrate (so turn pause that Michael Bublé song!) after all you sit exams in silence. A library would be ideal, otherwise ask your friends and family to have some consideration.

    Make a revision timetable ... :afraid:

    .... yes and try to stick to it .… and this requires will power and I always feel guilty when I have to add x to tomorrow’s to-do-list.
    Make sure the timeable has all the subjects ... quite obvious so no excuses!
    Mix your strong and weak subjects so you don’t do all of your difficult subjects on the same day.

    Distractions

    TV, computer games, PSP, Wii, TSR Chat – ask yourself this: “would you rather redo a module for the sake of MSN chatting, watching that movie when you have tonnes or going out with mates when you don’t have time for it”

    Practise Past Papers

    Practise makes perfect and it’s true - this is essential.
    Do as many as possible and use the mark scheme to make comparisons to understand what examiners are looking for.


    Positive Mindset vs Exam panic

    Courtesy of Tufts.

    Psychologists say that it is human nature to be negative - a sort of survival mechanism. But a mind steeped in negativity, such as mine, will only worsen one's survival chances.

    I think we should all develop a more positive mindset to exams if we have not done so already. Here’s some mind-changing suggestions that I have found inspirational.
    • Picture yourself getting a big fat A and visualize this over and over in vivid detail. If you maintain a positive, 'I can do it' attitude building up to your exams, your stress will be transformed into positive energy that can be harnessed to enhance your performance.
    • View the exam as a time-bound project of 90 days. Look forward to the fun and challenge in store on completion
    • It’s only an exam! You’re not going to die. Your family will not get kidnapped and tortured if you fail. And there’s always the resit!
    • An exam is simply an opportunity to show what you know.
    • Exams are designed to HELP you, and provide the lecturers with feedback so they can help you further.
    • Think of an exam as a game - against the examiner - which could be won or lost.
    • You will be just the same person before and after the exam. Exams don’t measure anything really important about you.
    • You have had a number of successes already and have actually passed many exams - hold on to that. Focus on the positive aspects of the past rather than the negative ones, as this will spur you on to yet more successes.

    Thought-stopping technique
    When we become anxious we begin to have negative thoughts ('I can't answer anything', 'I'm going to panic' etc). If this is happening, halt the spiralling thoughts by mentally shouting 'STOP!'. Or picture a road STOP sign, or traffic lights on red. Once you have literally stopped the thoughts, you can continue planning, or practise a relaxation technique.

    Use a mantra
    Derived from meditation, a mantra is a word or phrase which you repeat to yourself. Saying something like 'calm' or 'relax' under your breath or in your head, over and over again, can help defuse anxiety.

    Focusing
    Looking out of the window, noticing the number of people with red hair, counting the number of desks in each row... all help to distract your attention from anxious thoughts and keep your mind busy. Mental games such as making words out of another word or title, using alphabetical lists etc are all good forms of distraction.

    Bridging objects
    It can help to carry or wear something with positive associations with another person or place. Touching this bridging object can be comforting in its own right, then allow yourself a few minutes to think about the person or situation which makes you feel good. This can have a really calming effect.

    Self-talk
    In exam anxiety or panic we often give ourselves negative messages, 'I can't do this' 'I'm going to fail' 'I'm useless'. Try to consciously replace these with positive, encouraging thoughts: 'This is just anxiety, it can't harm me', 'Relax, concentrate, it's going to be OK', 'I'm getting there, nearly over'.


    Some of the top tips from the other threads:

    My best advice is to make a plan for every week, so you maximise your time and can decide exactly how much you do and on what you want to focus on. It feels all good inside when you complete a 5 hour stint! Also take regular breaks. It's no good sitting at a desk for ages getting stressier and stressier and not taking anything in. (Rose64)

    A good tip for languages discursive essays is to write pros and cons charts for issues like university funding, gap years, recycling, divorce, etc etc and any other topics you have studied. If you then get an essay on this in the exam you've already done the plan!! For studying eng lit texts I always make a main points sheet/booklet where i write down everything i can on each charater and theme (including quotes) this way you can just rewrite the para in ure exam if something relevant comes up. (fooish*87)

    Good notes are the key to effective revision. Everytime you cover something new, write it down clearly and legibly, make sure you understand it - and then file it. When it comes to revising it's as simple as going over all of your concise, well-written notes, for let's say - 1 hour. Do this again for 15 minutes before bed, followed by at least 8 hours sleep. (raven)

    I'm just in the middle of creating CDs for Social/Cognitive/Cognitive Development Psychology, and one for my A2 Sociology unit. I'm putting all of my information on there so I can play it back and listen to it. And, if you're like me and like the sound of your own voice (:P) it's good :P.

    Once you have revised something, ALWAYS give yourself a mini quiz to refresh your brain. Do this at the end of the revision session, then at the end of the day, and then at the beginning of the next day. This will push it into your long term memory. (Brimstone)

    For subjects like maths, all you can really do is question after question after question. During my revision for C2 I found the tough logarithm questions quite hard at first so I just did log question after log question after log question from the C2 book. By the end, I was an expert at C2 logarithm questions! By repeating so many questions you end up with a sixth sense for what the next thing to do in a tricky question is. (Gamaya)

    Personally for the subjects that require memorised knowledge I have mnemonics for everything. I highly recommend them. For instance today I needed to remember what a ketone is, so I thought ketone sounds a lot like keystone, and the keystone is always in the middle of a bridge, and a ketone has a double bonded oxygen in the middle. It's great because unlike computers the more you put into a brain the easier it is to remember. Mnemonics only really work if you make them up yourself though. (steelmole)

    Post it notes with key facts on them posted around your bath, opposite your loo, on your sink and on the cupboard where you keep your coffee or biscuits. Different coloured post it notes for different subjects. Only works if you keep the amount low. (castafoire)

    I always find it really helpful to do one past paper before I've done any revision, then when I go back to looking at it the night before my exam, I realise how much more I know now. That always makes me feel better about myself and my chances. (Phalanges)

    Find out what kind of learner you are. i.e Visual, auditory, or emotional. If you learn best by remembering things you see, make your notes look all pretty and bright so they'll stick in your mind. Or, if you learn best by hearing stuff, record yourself talking about a subject. (rose64)


    :awesome: If you have any questions or extra tips on revision, then let me know here! :awesome:

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    I wish I knew this when I was studying.

    In regards to flashcards - there are also similar techniques where you do things like words and have the definition on the other side or question and the answer on the other side. If you have a friend studying the same topic, it also helps to test each other in the same way.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I wish I knew this when I was studying.

    In regards to flashcards - there are also similar techniques where you do things like words and have the definition on the other side or question and the answer on the other side. If you have a friend studying the same topic, it also helps to test each other in the same way.
    i always get my mum to test me on my flashcards :mmm:
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    This is so fab! - 'Prsom'. ^-^

    Edit: Infact, I'll come back at midnight/something so I can do it. :lol:
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    (Original post by Gingerbread101)
    :awesome: Hi everyone :awesome:

    As we come to the end of the half term, lots of people are wanting to get ahead with their revision already! However, it's only natural for a lot of you to have questions on the best ways to revise and manage your time, especially if this is your first round of major exams!

    When should I get started?
    According to our poll last year, most of you voted that the best time to get started for revision is February! It's always best to get ahead with your revision and then you don't need to cram in the last month.

    How should I manage my time? Should I make a timetable?
    Personally, I think a revision timetable is one of the ultimate methods of distraction and procrastination :mmm: While it might work for some people (in which case I would thoroughly recommend TSR's study planner), a lot of the time we have a tendency to make them too rigid, unrealistic or spend too much time making them.
    Instead, I'd recommend making a checklist at the start of every day with 3-5 things on that you want to achieve that day. With a small list rather than a massive schedule, it will look like your workload is a lot smaller, easier to manage and you'll find it easier to get motivated.

    What should I revise first?
    While you might be tempted to revise the things you enjoy first and put off the harder things, I find this technique works best:
    Name:  WP_20160218_001.jpg
Views: 2719
Size:  510.7 KB
    Make a graph for each of your subjects, and plot every topic on it. Start in the area marked '1' for your revision, and work your way through them that way.
    Make sure you go back and replot the graph once you've revised everything, to see what still needs more work!

    How do I actually revise then?!
    There's too many revision techniques to list, but the most effective things for you will depend on what kind of learner you are. If you don't already know, then take a quiz like this one and try and tailor your revision to your type.
    • Post it notes: This has to be one of my favourite methods of revision. Write key words, quotes, equations, definitions, dates, etc on post it notes (colour code them if you have different topics) and stick them on your wall where you'll see them all the time. Whenever you look at them, read them and say them outloud, and test yourself on them all the time.
    • Condense your notes:Combining both your class notes and your textbook, try to fit all of the information from each topic onto an A4 page. Then condense that down into A5. Then keep halving until you have all of the key information on a flash card sized piece of paper.
    • Flashcards: You can write essay plans, definitions and key points on flashcards, and then hole punch them and put them on a ring to keep them together and take some with you whenever you go out. While you're sat on the bus, instead of browsing the internet aimlessly, test yourself on a few flashcards!
    • Past papers: The holy grail of revision. Nothing beats replicating a real exam for practice- do a whole paper with no notes, then mark it and highlight on the mark scheme all of the marks that you missed. Go back through the paper and add corrections and additions in a different coloured pen, and make a note of the topics where you missed marks so you can look over them again.
    :awesome: If you have any questions or extra tips on revision, then let me know here! :awesome:
    Hi, This all very good info! But with regards to your advice on past papers, would you recommend doing past papers with Only essay based subjects? If so, would it be wise to mark the essay myself or not?
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    (Original post by King Geedorah)
    Hi, This all very good info! But with regards to your advice on past papers, would you recommend doing past papers with Only essay based subjects? If so, would it be wise to mark the essay myself or not?
    Past papers for essays are great for making sure you can write the essays in the time given
    The only problem is that it's really tricky to mark your own essays, so I'd advise giving it to a teacher, I'm sure they wouldn't mind marking a few essays
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    (Original post by Gingerbread101)
    :awesome: Hi everyone :awesome:

    As we come to the end of the half term, lots of people are wanting to get ahead with their revision already! However, it's only natural for a lot of you to have questions on the best ways to revise and manage your time, especially if this is your first round of major exams!

    When should I get started?
    According to our poll last year, most of you voted that the best time to get started for revision is February! It's always best to get ahead with your revision and then you don't need to cram in the last month.

    How should I manage my time? Should I make a timetable?
    Personally, I think a revision timetable is one of the ultimate methods of distraction and procrastination :mmm: While it might work for some people (in which case I would thoroughly recommend TSR's study planner), a lot of the time we have a tendency to make them too rigid, unrealistic or spend too much time making them.
    Instead, I'd recommend making a checklist at the start of every day with 3-5 things on that you want to achieve that day. With a small list rather than a massive schedule, it will look like your workload is a lot smaller, easier to manage and you'll find it easier to get motivated.

    What should I revise first?
    While you might be tempted to revise the things you enjoy first and put off the harder things, I find this technique works best:
    Name:  WP_20160218_001.jpg
Views: 2719
Size:  510.7 KB
    Make a graph for each of your subjects, and plot every topic on it. Start in the area marked '1' for your revision, and work your way through them that way.
    Make sure you go back and replot the graph once you've revised everything, to see what still needs more work!

    How do I actually revise then?!
    There's too many revision techniques to list, but the most effective things for you will depend on what kind of learner you are. If you don't already know, then take a quiz like this one and try and tailor your revision to your type.
    • Post it notes: This has to be one of my favourite methods of revision. Write key words, quotes, equations, definitions, dates, etc on post it notes (colour code them if you have different topics) and stick them on your wall where you'll see them all the time. Whenever you look at them, read them and say them outloud, and test yourself on them all the time.
    • Condense your notes:Combining both your class notes and your textbook, try to fit all of the information from each topic onto an A4 page. Then condense that down into A5. Then keep halving until you have all of the key information on a flash card sized piece of paper.
    • Flashcards: You can write essay plans, definitions and key points on flashcards, and then hole punch them and put them on a ring to keep them together and take some with you whenever you go out. While you're sat on the bus, instead of browsing the internet aimlessly, test yourself on a few flashcards!
    • Past papers: The holy grail of revision. Nothing beats replicating a real exam for practice- do a whole paper with no notes, then mark it and highlight on the mark scheme all of the marks that you missed. Go back through the paper and add corrections and additions in a different coloured pen, and make a note of the topics where you missed marks so you can look over them again.
    :awesome: If you have any questions or extra tips on revision, then let me know here! :awesome:
    I should really be sleeping but these tips are amazing! I really like the idea of making a graph on what to get started with and just make a short to-do list of what you want to do on that day. I will use these tips on top of a pile of others I have stored mentally Thanks Gingerbread!
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    Thanks for this!
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    Past paper ideas were very helpful I am going to pass some of these tips onto my friends.....hopefully they will thank me!
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    Never realised the past papers I do for homework are revision
    Gingerbread101
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    Great tips as usual. I might try to apply them to my own revision :awesome:
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    Hey.
    just curious how "intense" are your sessions,i can never really tell whether i`m trying to cram too much into one session or spending too long on another.
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Gingerbread101)
    :awesome: Hi everyone :awesome:

    As we come to the end of the half term, lots of people are wanting to get ahead with their revision already! However, it's only natural for a lot of you to have questions on the best ways to revise and manage your time, especially if this is your first round of major exams!

    When should I get started?
    According to our poll last year, most of you voted that the best time to get started for revision is February! It's always best to get ahead with your revision and then you don't need to cram in the last month.

    How should I manage my time? Should I make a timetable?
    Personally, I think a revision timetable is one of the ultimate methods of distraction and procrastination :mmm: While it might work for some people (in which case I would thoroughly recommend TSR's study planner), a lot of the time we have a tendency to make them too rigid, unrealistic or spend too much time making them.
    Instead, I'd recommend making a checklist at the start of every day with 3-5 things on that you want to achieve that day. With a small list rather than a massive schedule, it will look like your workload is a lot smaller, easier to manage and you'll find it easier to get motivated.

    What should I revise first?
    While you might be tempted to revise the things you enjoy first and put off the harder things, I find this technique works best:
    Name:  WP_20160218_001.jpg
Views: 2719
Size:  510.7 KB
    Make a graph for each of your subjects, and plot every topic on it. Start in the area marked '1' for your revision, and work your way through them that way.
    Make sure you go back and replot the graph once you've revised everything, to see what still needs more work!

    How do I actually revise then?!
    There's too many revision techniques to list, but the most effective things for you will depend on what kind of learner you are. If you don't already know, then take a quiz like this one and try and tailor your revision to your type.
    • Post it notes: This has to be one of my favourite methods of revision. Write key words, quotes, equations, definitions, dates, etc on post it notes (colour code them if you have different topics) and stick them on your wall where you'll see them all the time. Whenever you look at them, read them and say them outloud, and test yourself on them all the time.
    • Condense your notes:Combining both your class notes and your textbook, try to fit all of the information from each topic onto an A4 page. Then condense that down into A5. Then keep halving until you have all of the key information on a flash card sized piece of paper.
    • Flashcards: You can write essay plans, definitions and key points on flashcards, and then hole punch them and put them on a ring to keep them together and take some with you whenever you go out. While you're sat on the bus, instead of browsing the internet aimlessly, test yourself on a few flashcards!
    • Past papers: The holy grail of revision. Nothing beats replicating a real exam for practice- do a whole paper with no notes, then mark it and highlight on the mark scheme all of the marks that you missed. Go back through the paper and add corrections and additions in a different coloured pen, and make a note of the topics where you missed marks so you can look over them again.
    :awesome: If you have any questions or extra tips on revision, then let me know here! :awesome:
    Wow these tips are amazing! No wonder why you got 11A* and 1A Thanks
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    (Original post by SamuelN98)
    Hey.
    just curious how "intense" are your sessions,i can never really tell whether i`m trying to cram too much into one session or spending too long on another.
    Thanks
    Hey, sorry I never replied to this!

    I generally remove all distractions and technology from reaching distance and work continuously for 30 mins, but not with such speed or anything that it tires me out or hurts my head. If you're trying to cram too much in then you won't be learning it - it's always best to spend more time on one thing than not enough and trying to cover as much as possible as quickly as possible
    (Original post by nisha.sri)
    Wow these tips are amazing! No wonder why you got 11A* and 1A Thanks
    Thanks :hugs:
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    Hi whic board are you taking?
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    (Original post by Abdullahmaqbool)
    Hi whic board are you taking?
    I take lots of different exam boards - these are universal tips
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    (Original post by Gingerbread101)
    :awesome: Hi everyone :awesome:

    As we come to the end of the half term, lots of people are wanting to get ahead with their revision already! However, it's only natural for a lot of you to have questions on the best ways to revise and manage your time, especially if this is your first round of major exams!

    When should I get started?
    According to our poll last year, most of you voted that the best time to get started for revision is February! It's always best to get ahead with your revision and then you don't need to cram in the last month.

    How should I manage my time? Should I make a timetable?
    Personally, I think a revision timetable is one of the ultimate methods of distraction and procrastination :mmm: While it might work for some people (in which case I would thoroughly recommend TSR's study planner), a lot of the time we have a tendency to make them too rigid, unrealistic or spend too much time making them.
    Instead, I'd recommend making a checklist at the start of every day with 3-5 things on that you want to achieve that day. With a small list rather than a massive schedule, it will look like your workload is a lot smaller, easier to manage and you'll find it easier to get motivated.

    What should I revise first?
    While you might be tempted to revise the things you enjoy first and put off the harder things, I find this technique works best:
    Name:  WP_20160218_001.jpg
Views: 2719
Size:  510.7 KB
    Make a graph for each of your subjects, and plot every topic on it. Start in the area marked '1' for your revision, and work your way through them that way.
    Make sure you go back and replot the graph once you've revised everything, to see what still needs more work!

    How do I actually revise then?!
    There's too many revision techniques to list, but the most effective things for you will depend on what kind of learner you are. If you don't already know, then take a quiz like this one and try and tailor your revision to your type.
    • Post it notes: This has to be one of my favourite methods of revision. Write key words, quotes, equations, definitions, dates, etc on post it notes (colour code them if you have different topics) and stick them on your wall where you'll see them all the time. Whenever you look at them, read them and say them outloud, and test yourself on them all the time.
    • Condense your notes:Combining both your class notes and your textbook, try to fit all of the information from each topic onto an A4 page. Then condense that down into A5. Then keep halving until you have all of the key information on a flash card sized piece of paper.
    • Flashcards: You can write essay plans, definitions and key points on flashcards, and then hole punch them and put them on a ring to keep them together and take some with you whenever you go out. While you're sat on the bus, instead of browsing the internet aimlessly, test yourself on a few flashcards!
    • Past papers: The holy grail of revision. Nothing beats replicating a real exam for practice- do a whole paper with no notes, then mark it and highlight on the mark scheme all of the marks that you missed. Go back through the paper and add corrections and additions in a different coloured pen, and make a note of the topics where you missed marks so you can look over them again.
    :awesome: If you have any questions or extra tips on revision, then let me know here! :awesome:
    thanks I use past papers and cue cards I think I just need to know the way to answer the question and write it
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    (Original post by Gingerbread101)
    I take lots of different exam boards - these are universal tips
    For sociology and philosophy it is AQA and health and social care it is OCR
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    Yo If anyone is looking to get an A* in maths or just generally bring their grade up here is an Edexcel A* Question only Paper:

    A* Type Questions (Maths):

    1H: http://bland.in/gcse/a_star1h.pdf

    2H: http://bland.in/gcse/a_star2h.pdf
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    Thanks for your tips! I read these before I made an account but I thought I would share some thoughts here now that I can reply

    I tried making a checklist the other day, ended up only doing a quarter of what I planned (blame the internet) but at least I knew that I had done something productive and knew where I had to improve. Though I really like to make myself sound like I have everything together...

    My school ran a "learner type" test a while back and my result was that I was completely equal for everything which is both good and painfully frustrating since I agree that one learning method doesn't particularly work better than another for me. Usually I end up resorting to cramming all the details and hoping for the best... if I drill it in enough, I eventually can recall it!

    I actually tried the "condensing your notes" idea some days ago with one of the topics for Physics. In the process, I was able to remember some particular facts more clearly, though I still am not 100% sure on everything which is slightly worrying. I used to have voice recordings of myself reading out all my notes that I'd listen to all the time (kinda helps register in my subconscious, I suppose) though I accidentally deleted them all and haven't really been in the mood to re-record them.

    My favourite has to be the "post it notes" idea where you stick stuff on the walls to recall. My version of it is actually writing out what I need to know on A4 sheets - one idea on one sheet or two (for example I covered the Haber process for Chemistry on 2 sheets) and blue-tacking them at random places around the house. I found the ones in the bathroom were glued to my memory the most because there's really not much to do when you're on the loo!

    Anyways, thanks for writing up your tips! They were very helpful
 
 
 

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