Ultimate Revision Tips Thread - Share Yours!! Watch

arizonaidiot
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Tips for IAL edexcel and GCE edexcel(2008) syllabus physics and biology?Any tips for their study resources?I'm talking about AS level btw.
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Gingerbread101
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(Original post by Amylololol)
This is SO brilliantly written and just as useful! Wish I knew this last year ;____; but like you said, it's not the end of the world - I'm preparing for resits and I'll keep what you said in mind - These exams are a game between me and the examiner and I've beat this game countless times before so why not smash it even harder this time >
Thanks a billion for this blog! Everything looks so much brighter now :'D
:hugs:
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melissa_an
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I would also like to contribute some of the editing tips over here:

http://blog.plagiarismsearch.com/how...it-your-essay/
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travellifemane
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if i am a person who learns from doing things. how i am meant to learn history, english language and english lierature.
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Gingerbread101
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(Original post by travellifemane)
if i am a person who learns from doing things. how i am meant to learn history, english language and english lierature.
For literature, learning quotes could be done by acting them out. For the others, have you tried explaining the things you're learning to other people?
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Igorzycho
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This actually motivated me to do some revision!

But before I go, below are some tips that you haven't covered and I think someone may find useful:

1) Investing in a whiteboard (doesn't have to be big) and using it to write down key information/definitions/diagrams as you read along and study from a textbook. This way you are creating muscle memory and doing active revision! (saying what you're writing out loud also helps).

2) After that, test yourself; after finishing a chapter or topic, write/scribble everything you have learned on a piece of scrap paper and then throw it in the bin. Repeat this several times (this is similar to the one above but it's more of testing yourself and seeing how much you can recall).

3) Create anagrams! This is a simple and quick way of getting basic facts and factors about something into your head. For example, in biology I had to know the adaptations of alveoli. After reading about the adaptations, I came up with TMEG: Thin walls, Moist lining, Enormous surface area, Good blood supply. Although the anagram itself isn't a word and makes no sense, that's what makes it so memorable. Play around with the letters and words and create your own ones so you can remember them (personally I think the order is fundamental;
TMEG sounds better than EGMT, making it more easier to pronounce, don't you think?)

Hopefully you found this some what helpful and I wish everyone a productive and happy week ahead!
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freeFD
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Your tips are great! And I'll suggest one of my own.
I write a summary of the chapter on a post-it note, according to the syllabus. Because there is limited space you are forced to write the only necessary parts, which are mentioned in the syllabus. And when the exam term starts, just revise the post-it notes
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Pradipta
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Hey there! I know this is very late but coffee along with naps was really helpful! If you want to know more about you can check out an article I wrote: bit.ly/TheCoffeeNap
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bfm.mcdermott
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Quizlet is great for memorising facts, terms and language vocab, as well as equations. It’s also good if you have no one to test you, and it’s faster than writing out flashcards
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EO4LIF3
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Hello everybody! Opinions on revision cards? Because I will start to use it in preparation for GCSEs and Mocks. I know past papers are good as well as revision notes/class notes but I can’t find any flash cards in shops and I don’t exactly know how many I should have since they are for definitions etc. Also do post it notes(which I’ve got) have the same use as flash cards. If so, can someone please give an example as to how to use it in a subject.
Much Appreciated
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aga21
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Hello! This is soooo useful for me <33
I was thinking - do you often practice studying with friends? Do you find it useful?
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llaurenamechi
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(Original post by King Geedorah)
Hi, This all very good info! But with regards to your advice on past papers, would you recommend doing past papers with Only essay based subjects? If so, would it be wise to mark the essay myself or not?
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llaurenamechi
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(Original post by Gingerbread101)


:awesome: Hi everyone :awesome:

As we come to the end of the half term, lots of people are wanting to get ahead with their revision already! However, it's only natural for a lot of you to have questions on the best ways to revise and manage your time, especially if this is your first round of major exams!



When should I get started?
According to our poll last year, most of you voted that the best time to get started for revision is February! It's always best to get ahead with your revision and then you don't need to cram in the last month.

How should I manage my time? Should I make a timetable?
Personally, I think a revision timetable is one of the ultimate methods of distraction and procrastination :mmm: While it might work for some people (in which case I would thoroughly recommend TSR's study planner), a lot of the time we have a tendency to make them too rigid, unrealistic or spend too much time making them.
Instead, I'd recommend making a checklist at the start of every day with 3-5 things on that you want to achieve that day. With a small list rather than a massive schedule, it will look like your workload is a lot smaller, easier to manage and you'll find it easier to get motivated.

What should I revise first?
While you might be tempted to revise the things you enjoy first and put off the harder things, I find this technique works best:
Attachment 505777
Make a graph for each of your subjects, and plot every topic on it. Start in the area marked '1' for your revision, and work your way through them that way.
Make sure you go back and replot the graph once you've revised everything, to see what still needs more work!

How do I actually revise then?!
There's too many revision techniques to list, but the most effective things for you will depend on what kind of learner you are. If you don't already know, then take a quiz like this one and try and tailor your revision to your type.
  • Post it notes: This has to be one of my favourite methods of revision. Write key words, quotes, equations, definitions, dates, etc on post it notes (colour code them if you have different topics) and stick them on your wall where you'll see them all the time. Whenever you look at them, read them and say them outloud, and test yourself on them all the time.
  • Condense your notes:Combining both your class notes and your textbook, try to fit all of the information from each topic onto an A4 page. Then condense that down into A5. Then keep halving until you have all of the key information on a flash card sized piece of paper.
  • Flashcards: You can write essay plans, definitions and key points on flashcards, and then hole punch them and put them on a ring to keep them together and take some with you whenever you go out. While you're sat on the bus, instead of browsing the internet aimlessly, test yourself on a few flashcards!
  • Past papers: The holy grail of revision. Nothing beats replicating a real exam for practice- do a whole paper with no notes, then mark it and highlight on the mark scheme all of the marks that you missed. Go back through the paper and add corrections and additions in a different coloured pen, and make a note of the topics where you missed marks so you can look over them again.

An alternative method from Lord Hysteria

My Method
Step 1: Understand
  • Study the topic to be learnt slowly
  • Make sure you understand the key points and concepts
  • Mark up the text if necessary – underline, highlight etc
  • Re-read each paragraph slowly


GO TO STEP 2

Step 2: Summarise
  • Now make your revision note summary
  • What is the main idea, theme, concept?
  • What are the main points? How does the logic develop?
  • Use bullet points, minds maps, patterned notes
  • Link ideas using mnemonics, mind maps, crazy stories
  • Note the title and date of the revision notes
    (E.g. Mathematics, Trigonometry, 3rd March)
  • Organise the notes carefully and keep them in a file


This is now in your short term memory. You will forget 80% of it, if you don’t
go to step 3. GO TO STEP 3, but first take a break.

Step 3: Memorise

  • Take 25 minutes learning ‘bites’ with 5 min breaks
  • After each 5 min break test your self
  • Cover the original notes summary
  • Write down the main points
  • Speak it loud
  • Tell someone else
  • Repeat many times


The material is now in your long term memory. You will forget 40% of it, if
you don’t go to step 4. GO TO STEP 4.

Step 4: Track/Review

  • Create a revision diary (one A4 page per day)
  • Make a revision plan for each topic
  • E.g. 1 day later, I week later, 1 month later.
  • Record this in your revision diary

Mathematics, Trigonometry, 3rd March – 25 minutes
Mathematics, Trigonometry, 10rd March – 15 minutes
Mathematics, Trigonometry, 3rd April – 15 minutes
... and then at monthly intervals



Bits and BobsWhere should I revise?

Find somewhere quiet and comfy with a good light. It is important that it is quiet as it is the best way to concentrate (so turn pause that Michael Bublé song!) after all you sit exams in silence. A library would be ideal, otherwise ask your friends and family to have some consideration.

Make a revision timetable ... :afraid:

.... yes and try to stick to it .… and this requires will power and I always feel guilty when I have to add x to tomorrow’s to-do-list.
Make sure the timeable has all the subjects ... quite obvious so no excuses!
Mix your strong and weak subjects so you don’t do all of your difficult subjects on the same day.

Distractions

TV, computer games, PSP, Wii, TSR Chat – ask yourself this: “would you rather redo a module for the sake of MSN chatting, watching that movie when you have tonnes or going out with mates when you don’t have time for it”

Practise Past Papers

Practise makes perfect and it’s true - this is essential.
Do as many as possible and use the mark scheme to make comparisons to understand what examiners are looking for.


Positive Mindset vs Exam panic

Courtesy of Tufts.

Psychologists say that it is human nature to be negative - a sort of survival mechanism. But a mind steeped in negativity, such as mine, will only worsen one's survival chances.

I think we should all develop a more positive mindset to exams if we have not done so already. Here’s some mind-changing suggestions that I have found inspirational.
  • Picture yourself getting a big fat A and visualize this over and over in vivid detail. If you maintain a positive, 'I can do it' attitude building up to your exams, your stress will be transformed into positive energy that can be harnessed to enhance your performance.
  • View the exam as a time-bound project of 90 days. Look forward to the fun and challenge in store on completion
  • It’s only an exam! You’re not going to die. Your family will not get kidnapped and tortured if you fail. And there’s always the resit!
  • An exam is simply an opportunity to show what you know.
  • Exams are designed to HELP you, and provide the lecturers with feedback so they can help you further.
  • Think of an exam as a game - against the examiner - which could be won or lost.
  • You will be just the same person before and after the exam. Exams don’t measure anything really important about you.
  • You have had a number of successes already and have actually passed many exams - hold on to that. Focus on the positive aspects of the past rather than the negative ones, as this will spur you on to yet more successes.

Thought-stopping technique
When we become anxious we begin to have negative thoughts ('I can't answer anything', 'I'm going to panic' etc). If this is happening, halt the spiralling thoughts by mentally shouting 'STOP!'. Or picture a road STOP sign, or traffic lights on red. Once you have literally stopped the thoughts, you can continue planning, or practise a relaxation technique.

Use a mantra
Derived from meditation, a mantra is a word or phrase which you repeat to yourself. Saying something like 'calm' or 'relax' under your breath or in your head, over and over again, can help defuse anxiety.

Focusing
Looking out of the window, noticing the number of people with red hair, counting the number of desks in each row... all help to distract your attention from anxious thoughts and keep your mind busy. Mental games such as making words out of another word or title, using alphabetical lists etc are all good forms of distraction.

Bridging objects
It can help to carry or wear something with positive associations with another person or place. Touching this bridging object can be comforting in its own right, then allow yourself a few minutes to think about the person or situation which makes you feel good. This can have a really calming effect.

Self-talk
In exam anxiety or panic we often give ourselves negative messages, 'I can't do this' 'I'm going to fail' 'I'm useless'. Try to consciously replace these with positive, encouraging thoughts: 'This is just anxiety, it can't harm me', 'Relax, concentrate, it's going to be OK', 'I'm getting there, nearly over'.


Some of the top tips from the other threads:

My best advice is to make a plan for every week, so you maximise your time and can decide exactly how much you do and on what you want to focus on. It feels all good inside when you complete a 5 hour stint! Also take regular breaks. It's no good sitting at a desk for ages getting stressier and stressier and not taking anything in. (Rose64)

A good tip for languages discursive essays is to write pros and cons charts for issues like university funding, gap years, recycling, divorce, etc etc and any other topics you have studied. If you then get an essay on this in the exam you've already done the plan!! For studying eng lit texts I always make a main points sheet/booklet where i write down everything i can on each charater and theme (including quotes) this way you can just rewrite the para in ure exam if something relevant comes up. (fooish*87)

Good notes are the key to effective revision. Everytime you cover something new, write it down clearly and legibly, make sure you understand it - and then file it. When it comes to revising it's as simple as going over all of your concise, well-written notes, for let's say - 1 hour. Do this again for 15 minutes before bed, followed by at least 8 hours sleep. (raven)

I'm just in the middle of creating CDs for Social/Cognitive/Cognitive Development Psychology, and one for my A2 Sociology unit. I'm putting all of my information on there so I can play it back and listen to it. And, if you're like me and like the sound of your own voice (:P) it's good :P.

Once you have revised something, ALWAYS give yourself a mini quiz to refresh your brain. Do this at the end of the revision session, then at the end of the day, and then at the beginning of the next day. This will push it into your long term memory. (Brimstone)

For subjects like maths, all you can really do is question after question after question. During my revision for C2 I found the tough logarithm questions quite hard at first so I just did log question after log question after log question from the C2 book. By the end, I was an expert at C2 logarithm questions! By repeating so many questions you end up with a sixth sense for what the next thing to do in a tricky question is. (Gamaya)

Personally for the subjects that require memorised knowledge I have mnemonics for everything. I highly recommend them. For instance today I needed to remember what a ketone is, so I thought ketone sounds a lot like keystone, and the keystone is always in the middle of a bridge, and a ketone has a double bonded oxygen in the middle. It's great because unlike computers the more you put into a brain the easier it is to remember. Mnemonics only really work if you make them up yourself though. (steelmole)

Post it notes with key facts on them posted around your bath, opposite your loo, on your sink and on the cupboard where you keep your coffee or biscuits. Different coloured post it notes for different subjects. Only works if you keep the amount low. (castafoire)

I always find it really helpful to do one past paper before I've done any revision, then when I go back to looking at it the night before my exam, I realise how much more I know now. That always makes me feel better about myself and my chances. (Phalanges)

Find out what kind of learner you are. i.e Visual, auditory, or emotional. If you learn best by remembering things you see, make your notes look all pretty and bright so they'll stick in your mind. Or, if you learn best by hearing stuff, record yourself talking about a subject. (rose64)


:awesome: If you have any questions or extra tips on revision, then let me know here! :awesome:

Very helpful!
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King Geedorah
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(Original post by llaurenamechi)
👍🏽
Nice
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trissxo
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I have the cgp textbooks for the alev el chemistry and biology
I pair this with the official textbook.

GREAT REVISION TOOL
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Jackyjack96
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(Original post by Gingerbread101)



:awesome: Hi everyone :awesome:

As we come to the end of the half term, lots of people are wanting to get ahead with their revision already! However, it's only natural for a lot of you to have questions on the best ways to revise and manage your time, especially if this is your first round of major exams!




When should I get started?
According to our poll last year, most of you voted that the best time to get started for revision is February! It's always best to get ahead with your revision and then you don't need to cram in the last month.

How should I manage my time? Should I make a timetable?
Personally, I think a revision timetable is one of the ultimate methods of distraction and procrastination :mmm: While it might work for some people (in which case I would thoroughly recommend TSR's study planner), a lot of the time we have a tendency to make them too rigid, unrealistic or spend too much time making them.
Instead, I'd recommend making a checklist at the start of every day with 3-5 things on that you want to achieve that day. With a small list rather than a massive schedule, it will look like your workload is a lot smaller, easier to manage and you'll find it easier to get motivated.

What should I revise first?
While you might be tempted to revise the things you enjoy first and put off the harder things, I find this technique works best:
Attachment 505777
Make a graph for each of your subjects, and plot every topic on it. Start in the area marked '1' for your revision, and work your way through them that way.
Make sure you go back and replot the graph once you've revised everything, to see what still needs more work!

How do I actually revise then?!
There's too many revision techniques to list, but the most effective things for you will depend on what kind of learner you are. If you don't already know, then take a quiz like this one and try and tailor your revision to your type.
  • Post it notes: This has to be one of my favourite methods of revision. Write key words, quotes, equations, definitions, dates, etc on post it notes (colour code them if you have different topics) and stick them on your wall where you'll see them all the time. Whenever you look at them, read them and say them outloud, and test yourself on them all the time.
  • Condense your notes:Combining both your class notes and your textbook, try to fit all of the information from each topic onto an A4 page. Then condense that down into A5. Then keep halving until you have all of the key information on a flash card sized piece of paper.
  • Flashcards: You can write essay plans, definitions and key points on flashcards, and then hole punch them and put them on a ring to keep them together and take some with you whenever you go out. While you're sat on the bus, instead of browsing the internet aimlessly, test yourself on a few flashcards!
  • Past papers: The holy grail of revision. Nothing beats replicating a real exam for practice- do a whole paper with no notes, then mark it and highlight on the mark scheme all of the marks that you missed. Go back through the paper and add corrections and additions in a different coloured pen, and make a note of the topics where you missed marks so you can look over them again.

An alternative method from Lord Hysteria

My Method
Step 1: Understand
  • Study the topic to be learnt slowly
  • Make sure you understand the key points and concepts
  • Mark up the text if necessary – underline, highlight etc
  • Re-read each paragraph slowly


GO TO STEP 2

Step 2: Summarise
  • Now make your revision note summary
  • What is the main idea, theme, concept?
  • What are the main points? How does the logic develop?
  • Use bullet points, minds maps, patterned notes
  • Link ideas using mnemonics, mind maps, crazy stories
  • Note the title and date of the revision notes
    (E.g. Mathematics, Trigonometry, 3rd March)
  • Organise the notes carefully and keep them in a file


This is now in your short term memory. You will forget 80% of it, if you don’t
go to step 3. GO TO STEP 3, but first take a break.

Step 3: Memorise

  • Take 25 minutes learning ‘bites’ with 5 min breaks
  • After each 5 min break test your self
  • Cover the original notes summary
  • Write down the main points
  • Speak it loud
  • Tell someone else
  • Repeat many times


The material is now in your long term memory. You will forget 40% of it, if
you don’t go to step 4. GO TO STEP 4.

Step 4: Track/Review

  • Create a revision diary (one A4 page per day)
  • Make a revision plan for each topic
  • E.g. 1 day later, I week later, 1 month later.
  • Record this in your revision diary

Mathematics, Trigonometry, 3rd March – 25 minutes
Mathematics, Trigonometry, 10rd March – 15 minutes
Mathematics, Trigonometry, 3rd April – 15 minutes
... and then at monthly intervals



Bits and BobsWhere should I revise?

Find somewhere quiet and comfy with a good light. It is important that it is quiet as it is the best way to concentrate (so turn pause that Michael Bublé song!) after all you sit exams in silence. A library would be ideal, otherwise ask your friends and family to have some consideration.

Make a revision timetable ... :afraid:

.... yes and try to stick to it .… and this requires will power and I always feel guilty when I have to add x to tomorrow’s to-do-list.
Make sure the timeable has all the subjects ... quite obvious so no excuses!
Mix your strong and weak subjects so you don’t do all of your difficult subjects on the same day.

Distractions

TV, computer games, PSP, Wii, TSR Chat – ask yourself this: “would you rather redo a module for the sake of MSN chatting, watching that movie when you have tonnes or going out with mates when you don’t have time for it”

Practise Past Papers

Practise makes perfect and it’s true - this is essential.
Do as many as possible and use the mark scheme to make comparisons to understand what examiners are looking for.


Positive Mindset vs Exam panic

Courtesy of Tufts.

Psychologists say that it is human nature to be negative - a sort of survival mechanism. But a mind steeped in negativity, such as mine, will only worsen one's survival chances.

I think we should all develop a more positive mindset to exams if we have not done so already. Here’s some mind-changing suggestions that I have found inspirational.
  • Picture yourself getting a big fat A and visualize this over and over in vivid detail. If you maintain a positive, 'I can do it' attitude building up to your exams, your stress will be transformed into positive energy that can be harnessed to enhance your performance.
  • View the exam as a time-bound project of 90 days. Look forward to the fun and challenge in store on completion
  • It’s only an exam! You’re not going to die. Your family will not get kidnapped and tortured if you fail. And there’s always the resit!
  • An exam is simply an opportunity to show what you know.
  • Exams are designed to HELP you, and provide the lecturers with feedback so they can help you further.
  • Think of an exam as a game - against the examiner - which could be won or lost.
  • You will be just the same person before and after the exam. Exams don’t measure anything really important about you.
  • You have had a number of successes already and have actually passed many exams - hold on to that. Focus on the positive aspects of the past rather than the negative ones, as this will spur you on to yet more successes.

Thought-stopping technique
When we become anxious we begin to have negative thoughts ('I can't answer anything', 'I'm going to panic' etc). If this is happening, halt the spiralling thoughts by mentally shouting 'STOP!'. Or picture a road STOP sign, or traffic lights on red. Once you have literally stopped the thoughts, you can continue planning, or practise a relaxation technique.

Use a mantra
Derived from meditation, a mantra is a word or phrase which you repeat to yourself. Saying something like 'calm' or 'relax' under your breath or in your head, over and over again, can help defuse anxiety.

Focusing
Looking out of the window, noticing the number of people with red hair, counting the number of desks in each row... all help to distract your attention from anxious thoughts and keep your mind busy. Mental games such as making words out of another word or title, using alphabetical lists etc are all good forms of distraction.

Bridging objects
It can help to carry or wear something with positive associations with another person or place. Touching this bridging object can be comforting in its own right, then allow yourself a few minutes to think about the person or situation which makes you feel good. This can have a really calming effect.

Self-talk
In exam anxiety or panic we often give ourselves negative messages, 'I can't do this' 'I'm going to fail' 'I'm useless'. Try to consciously replace these with positive, encouraging thoughts: 'This is just anxiety, it can't harm me', 'Relax, concentrate, it's going to be OK', 'I'm getting there, nearly over'.


Some of the top tips from the other threads:

My best advice is to make a plan for every week, so you maximise your time and can decide exactly how much you do and on what you want to focus on. It feels all good inside when you complete a 5 hour stint! Also take regular breaks. It's no good sitting at a desk for ages getting stressier and stressier and not taking anything in. (Rose64)

A good tip for languages discursive essays is to write pros and cons charts for issues like university funding, gap years, recycling, divorce, etc etc and any other topics you have studied. If you then get an essay on this in the exam you've already done the plan!! For studying eng lit texts I always make a main points sheet/booklet where i write down everything i can on each charater and theme (including quotes) this way you can just rewrite the para in ure exam if something relevant comes up. (fooish*87)

Good notes are the key to effective revision. Everytime you cover something new, write it down clearly and legibly, make sure you understand it - and then file it. When it comes to revising it's as simple as going over all of your concise, well-written notes, for let's say - 1 hour. Do this again for 15 minutes before bed, followed by at least 8 hours sleep. (raven)

I'm just in the middle of creating CDs for Social/Cognitive/Cognitive Development Psychology, and one for my A2 Sociology unit. I'm putting all of my information on there so I can play it back and listen to it. And, if you're like me and like the sound of your own voice (:P) it's good :P.

Once you have revised something, ALWAYS give yourself a mini quiz to refresh your brain. Do this at the end of the revision session, then at the end of the day, and then at the beginning of the next day. This will push it into your long term memory. (Brimstone)

For subjects like maths, all you can really do is question after question after question. During my revision for C2 I found the tough logarithm questions quite hard at first so I just did log question after log question after log question from the C2 book. By the end, I was an expert at C2 logarithm questions! By repeating so many questions you end up with a sixth sense for what the next thing to do in a tricky question is. (Gamaya)

Personally for the subjects that require memorised knowledge I have mnemonics for everything. I highly recommend them. For instance today I needed to remember what a ketone is, so I thought ketone sounds a lot like keystone, and the keystone is always in the middle of a bridge, and a ketone has a double bonded oxygen in the middle. It's great because unlike computers the more you put into a brain the easier it is to remember. Mnemonics only really work if you make them up yourself though. (steelmole)

Post it notes with key facts on them posted around your bath, opposite your loo, on your sink and on the cupboard where you keep your coffee or biscuits. Different coloured post it notes for different subjects. Only works if you keep the amount low. (castafoire)

I always find it really helpful to do one past paper before I've done any revision, then when I go back to looking at it the night before my exam, I realise how much more I know now. That always makes me feel better about myself and my chances. (Phalanges)

Find out what kind of learner you are. i.e Visual, auditory, or emotional. If you learn best by remembering things you see, make your notes look all pretty and bright so they'll stick in your mind. Or, if you learn best by hearing stuff, record yourself talking about a subject. (rose64)



:awesome: If you have any questions or extra tips on revision, then let me know here! :awesome:



But before you start revising you need your brain to be working here's a pretty good blog article on brain food ideas
https://thestudenthousingcompany.com...foods-students
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AngelStarfire
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For essay plans for English Literature, can someone give me an example please? I don't understand how to do one.
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Gingerbread101
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#58
(Original post by AngelStarfire)
For essay plans for English Literature, can someone give me an example please? I don't understand how to do one.
It depends what kind of essay you're doing - whether you're being asked to analyse a quote, compare two different poems, look at the representation of something in one poem, etc
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AngelStarfire
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#59
Report 2 months ago
#59
(Original post by Gingerbread101)
It depends what kind of essay you're doing - whether you're being asked to analyse a quote, compare two different poems, look at the representation of something in one poem, etc
Mainly the last two examples you gave. I need help with essay plans as a whole for English Lit.
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