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Economics/Computer Science AS Level watch

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    I will be doing my AS levels next year; Maths, Further Maths and Physics but I can't decide my 4th,I was wondering if anyone can give me details on these two subjects as I've never studied them before.
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    Computer science is: learning all the hardware components of a computer and how they work. There is also a small section on representing data in a computer (Binary, Hex, ASCII). You will probably be taught how to do basic programming as exams require you to write algorithms, another thing you learn, they are basically a set of instructions you tell a computer to carry out a task, you will learn to write, test, improve or identify mistakes in them if they don't carry out the intended purpose. It is quite a new an exciting A level, although it is not needed to a degree in computer science, it would certainly help as you can develop a passion for the subject beforehand. The one big issue with the subject is the amount of information you will need to remember to get a good grade in the exam, which if you're like me (i have the same A level choices as you) will be a bit of a pain.

    At A2, you will probably have to do a project, which is quite flexible, but if it's your fourth then you are probably dropping it so that's ok.
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    (Original post by jamierogers21)
    I will be doing my AS levels next year; Maths, Further Maths and Physics but I can't decide my 4th,I was wondering if anyone can give me details on these two subjects as I've never studied them before.
    What might you want to do at uni? Also, are you considering chemistry (that's the classic 4th subject with that combination)?
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    (Original post by Bobjim12)
    Computer science is: learning all the hardware components of a computer and how they work. There is also a small section on representing data in a computer (Binary, Hex, ASCII). You will probably be taught how to do basic programming as exams require you to write algorithms, another thing you learn, they are basically a set of instructions you tell a computer to carry out a task, you will learn to write, test, improve or identify mistakes in them if they don't carry out the intended purpose. It is quite a new an exciting A level, although it is not needed to a degree in computer science, it would certainly help as you can develop a passion for the subject beforehand. The one big issue with the subject is the amount of information you will need to remember to get a good grade in the exam, which if you're like me (i have the same A level choices as you) will be a bit of a pain.

    At A2, you will probably have to do a project, which is quite flexible, but if it's your fourth then you are probably dropping it so that's ok.
    I have never tried programming or anything like that although I feel I might be quite good at it because, from what I've heard, it's all about logic and number. Yeah I'll only be taking it to AS no matter what. How much maths is involved?
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    (Original post by sweeneyrod)
    What might you want to do at uni? Also, are you considering chemistry (that's the classic 4th subject with that combination)?
    I'm hoping to do a Maths or Physics degree but I might change my mind depending on what I choose as my 4th. I don't think I want to do Chemistry because it is one of the only subjects at GCSE that I don't enjoy.
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    (Original post by jamierogers21)
    I have never tried programming or anything like that although I feel I might be quite good at it because, from what I've heard, it's all about logic and number. Yeah I'll only be taking it to AS no matter what. How much maths is involved?
    Very little, post-GCSE, you may need a good understanding of bases; binary is base 2 which means that all numbers in binary can only be represented in 1s or 0s, this may not make sense but when you come to learning it you will make sense of it easily. Same with the other representations (hex is base 16).

    In algorithms, you will need more logical skills rather than mathematical. The rest of the course is just information.

    If you want to try out programming/coding, try www.codecademy.com and have a go at the python course, it is recommended for beginner's and quite a straightforward syntax (language rules), it would be quite similar to a language you will be expected to learn in your AS level

    EDIT: it must be noted that at degree level, it does get quite mathematical as they teach you to be a good programmer, through maths. For now it is just teaching you the real basics that would be similar to your first term at Uni
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    (Original post by jamierogers21)
    I'm hoping to do a Maths or Physics degree but I might change my mind depending on what I choose as my 4th. I don't think I want to do Chemistry because it is one of the only subjects at GCSE that I don't enjoy.
    I think it's worth bearing in mind that Chemistry is very different at AS to what it's like at GCSE (although most people don't like the change, because it gets harder). If you're interested in Economics, it would be wise to do that -- it's difficult to do an Economics degree without any essay-based subjects. The same doesn't apply to Computer Science, where having it at A-level isn't necessary. Aside from that, both subjects are decent choices for Maths and Physics. Computer Science is somewhat more relevant, but that isn't particularly important in this case.
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    (Original post by Bobjim12)
    Very little, post-GCSE, you may need a good understanding of bases; binary is base 2 which means that all numbers in binary can only be represented in 1s or 0s, this may not make sense but when you come to learning it you will make sense of it easily. Same with the other representations (hex is base 16).

    In algorithms, you will need more logical skills rather than mathematical. The rest of the course is just information.

    If you want to try out programming/coding, try www.codecademy.com and have a go at the python course, it is recommended for beginner's and quite a straightforward syntax (language rules), it would be quite similar to a language you will be expected to learn in your AS level

    EDIT: it must be noted that at degree level, it does get quite mathematical as they teach you to be a good programmer, through maths. For now it is just teaching you the real basics that would be similar to your first term at Uni
    I'll have a look on there later, would you recommend looking at the GCSE Computer Science course and seeing what it entails?
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    (Original post by sweeneyrod)
    it's difficult to do an Economics degree without any essay-based subjects.
    Another possibility would be History, even though it has no link to my other choices but I really enjoy it at GCSE and the course my college offers looks really good. This could also set me up if I decide I don't want to go into Maths/Science because my alternatives would be Law/Economics
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    (Original post by jamierogers21)
    Another possibility would be History, even though it has no link to my other choices but I really enjoy it at GCSE and the course my college offers looks really good. This could also set me up if I decide I don't want to go into Maths/Science because my alternatives would be Law/Economics
    Yes, history would be another good choice. It is necessary for law, and also allows the possibility of economics (although it isn't quite as good as economics A-level for that).
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    (Original post by sweeneyrod)
    I think it's worth bearing in mind that Chemistry is very different at AS to what it's like at GCSE (although most people don't like the change, because it gets harder). If you're interested in Economics, it would be wise to do that -- it's difficult to do an Economics degree without any essay-based subjects. The same doesn't apply to Computer Science, where having it at A-level isn't necessary. Aside from that, both subjects are decent choices for Maths and Physics. Computer Science is somewhat more relevant, but that isn't particularly important in this case.
    Imo, chemistry is more related and relevant to physics, especially if the OP wants to study particle physics later because chemistry involves studying a lot about particles (I think because I am still doing GCSEs and as someone said A-Levels are different from GCSEs). So I would recommend doing Chemistry according to your career choices.
    I am in year 11 and I have chosen the same subjects as you with CompSci(as a private candidate).
    Hope I helped
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    (Original post by jamierogers21)
    I'll have a look on there later, would you recommend looking at the GCSE Computer Science course and seeing what it entails?
    If you want to, it isn't necessary to do have done it at GCSE, i hadn't and got an A at AS. But it may offer some nice pre-reading to get you into the subject without the difficulty of A levels
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    (Original post by sweeneyrod)
    Yes, history would be another good choice. It is necessary for law, and also allows the possibility of economics (although it isn't quite as good as economics A-level for that).
    Its the choice between picking Further Maths which is almost essential for a Maths degree or picking Maths, History, Physics, CompSci to keep my options open:confused:
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    (Original post by Darshan98)
    Imo, chemistry is more related and relevant to physics, especially if the OP wants to study particle physics later because chemistry involves studying a lot about particles (I think because I am still doing GCSEs and as someone said A-Levels are different from GCSEs). So I would recommend doing Chemistry according to your career choices.
    I am in year 11 and I have chosen the same subjects as you with CompSci(as a private candidate).
    Hope I helped
    I'd probably hate chemistry, I really don't enjoy the metal "element" of it
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    (Original post by jamierogers21)
    Its the choice between picking Further Maths which is almost essential for a Maths degree or picking Maths, History, Physics, CompSci to keep my options open:confused:
    I'd definitely pick Maths, Further Maths, Physics and History over Maths, History, Physics and CompSci. Further Maths opens more doors than CompSci (as you recognize) but doesn't close any.
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    Would I be at a disadvantage applying to top unis with them A-Levels if I decide to study Law because I only have one essay-based subject?
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    (Original post by jamierogers21)
    I will be doing my AS levels next year; Maths, Further Maths and Physics but I can't decide my 4th,I was wondering if anyone can give me details on these two subjects as I've never studied them before.
    Economics is piss easy, Computer Science is way more interesting

    ^ My experience, however everyone's different.

    Also Computer Science will look better
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    (Original post by jamierogers21)
    Would I be at a disadvantage applying to top unis with them A-Levels if I decide to study Law because I only have one essay-based subject?
    Law let you take ANY 4 as all you've got to do is show you're achademic I know someone doing Law that didn't do a single essay subject (they have offer from UCL so pretty solid if you ask me :P)
 
 
 
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