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    Hi all,

    hoping for a little advice here. I have an interview on Tuesday for a primary NQT job that I want more than I can say.

    I have to teach a 30 minute lesson to a mixed class of year 2s and 3s, on a topic of my choice.

    I've been given a bit of information about the class: I know the number of children and approximately a breakdown of their ability levels and whether there are any SEN children etc. I asked for (and received) the topics they have been studying in class recently, so I didn't end up covering anything that they've done recently.

    I have a few ideas about things that I could do, and it's all rather short notice so I need to come up with something fairly quickly. However, I was wondering: whatever subject I choose, should I try and link it to the topics they have done in class, so that they have a little background knowledge? Or should I just keep it stand alone? It's only 30 minutes, which is throwing my judgement a little bit...

    Thanks to anyone who can give advice!
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    (Original post by beanbrain)
    Hi all,

    hoping for a little advice here. I have an interview on Tuesday for a primary NQT job that I want more than I can say.

    I have to teach a 30 minute lesson to a mixed class of year 2s and 3s, on a topic of my choice.

    I've been given a bit of information about the class: I know the number of children and approximately a breakdown of their ability levels and whether there are any SEN children etc. I asked for (and received) the topics they have been studying in class recently, so I didn't end up covering anything that they've done recently.

    I have a few ideas about things that I could do, and it's all rather short notice so I need to come up with something fairly quickly. However, I was wondering: whatever subject I choose, should I try and link it to the topics they have done in class, so that they have a little background knowledge? Or should I just keep it stand alone? It's only 30 minutes, which is throwing my judgement a little bit...

    Thanks to anyone who can give advice!
    I'm not a primary teacher but here are my thoughts anyway...

    They are not looking for the best, most effective lesson. How can it be, when you don't know the kids or their prior learning? They're looking for skills and potential.

    They'll be looking for:
    -how you present yourself and interact with the pupils. You'll feel more relaxed and confident if you're leading the type of activity you're used to, so don't do something totally random and unfamiliar for interview.
    -understanding of how to structure a lesson, support and scaffold learning and provide challenge so that pupils make progress. So make sure you clearly show by the end of the lesson that pupils know or can do something they couldn't at the start. If you're concerned about demonstrating this effectively in a 30-minute lesson, you could write on your lesson plan what you would have done if it was a full 1-hour lesson. I did this for my NQT interviews and interviewers really liked it.
    -that you're reflective and able to adapt and improve. This is why they ask in the interview how you felt your lesson went. It's OK for things to have gone wrong (this happens to all of us, even experienced teachers) but the key is that you recognise this and have ideas for improving. It's also worth having back-up plans for during the lesson, in case pupils just don't get it (so a consolidation activity to go back over something) or already know it (something to move on further).

    Hope this helps.
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    I'm not a primary teacher but here are my thoughts anyway...

    They are not looking for the best, most effective lesson. How can it be, when you don't know the kids or their prior learning? They're looking for skills and potential.

    They'll be looking for:
    -how you present yourself and interact with the pupils. You'll feel more relaxed and confident if you're leading the type of activity you're used to, so don't do something totally random and unfamiliar for interview.
    -understanding of how to structure a lesson, support and scaffold learning and provide challenge so that pupils make progress. So make sure you clearly show by the end of the lesson that pupils know or can do something they couldn't at the start. If you're concerned about demonstrating this effectively in a 30-minute lesson, you could write on your lesson plan what you would have done if it was a full 1-hour lesson. I did this for my NQT interviews and interviewers really liked it.
    -that you're reflective and able to adapt and improve. This is why they ask in the interview how you felt your lesson went. It's OK for things to have gone wrong (this happens to all of us, even experienced teachers) but the key is that you recognise this and have ideas for improving. It's also worth having back-up plans for during the lesson, in case pupils just don't get it (so a consolidation activity to go back over something) or already know it (something to move on further).

    Hope this helps.
    Thanks for replying!

    I was sort of thinking about recycling a lesson I did a few weeks ago, as it's a Year 3 lesson and I know the subject really well. It will show progression from the beginning to the end, and it's active and interactive as well. I can make it easier or harder, depending on how well they do or don't know the topic, and on top of all of that, it's fun and can be done in 30 minutes!

    I love the idea of showing how it can be extended into an hour long lesson, thanks!
 
 
 
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