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    I know what being a chemical engineer is, but it's difficult to find out information about the actual course itself.
    So I have some questions, if someone who is currently studying ChemE would be kind enough to answer?

    1 How intense is the course, as in is there much time for breaks or is it constant study?

    2 How is the course taught, as in practical:lecture ratio, and also what the average practical is about and how is the average lecture taught? (I know this is distinctive but just give your own experience).

    3 How much of the course is learning about the processes and the equipment involved in the industry, compared to everything else?

    4 Would it be suitable to take notes on a laptop, or would handwriting notes be the most efficient method (during + after lectures)?

    5 How likely are you to get an internship, and get a job lined up for when you graduate?

    6 How much homework, or equivalent, is given on average? (Again, distinctive and somewhat linked to the first question).

    Sorry for the very specific questions, but thanks for reading!
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    Anybody at all?
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    (Original post by Productivity)
    Anybody at all?
    Ooooh me me pick me
    1.
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    Pretty intense I'd say, you will not be as free as your liberal art or social science friends to say the least. However with good time management there will be sufficient time to enjoy yourself outside of university. Hmm to give a comparison I would say the first few months took a LOT of getting used to(way harder than my two years at A-level combined), over time though you do build up resistance to it and get used to it. Having said all that I've been told second year is a nightmare :afraid:
    2.
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    Well it depends on what university you go to. In first year at my university we have labs every two weeks.The labs work are assessed in three ways namely interviews, posters or lab reports. Every lab the assessment method changes.

    Practicals vary however they usually go hand in hand with the lecture content, since it is the first year for me its on basic principles in chemical engineering such as mass & energy balances, fluid flow in pipes, heat transfer. So namely topics in fluid mechanics, heat transfer and energy balances as well as a few other topics that I can't remember (Practicals are however WAAAY better than those crappy titration ones you do in chemistry)

    Average lecture is taught two ways either in a 3 hour block where two hours is lecture and 1 hour is a tutorial or a 1 hour lecture 1 hour tutorial with one more hour an another day, usually the following day.
    3.
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    So far I've been learning the underlying principle in transport phenomena so heat transfer and fluid mechanics. You don't learn specific processes per say more the mechanisms in which certain types of processes undergo. Since the chemical engineering industry is huge there would be too many specific processes to learn. We use some of the equipment used in industry however a scaled down versions of them. But it also depends what industry you're talking about since it can vary from oil & gas industry to the pharmaceutical industry.

    Having said that we did a small case study on ammonia production.
    4.
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    There are a few people who use laptops to take notes so it would be fine if that's what you prefer. I think the lecture notes are quite sufficient when combined the tutorial sheets and past papers.
    5.
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    It all depends on you, even if you went to the best university in the world at most all it would do is put you in the interview chair. After that you're on your own.
    6.
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    Well tutorials are usually kinda hard and so they're difficult to finish in the one hour seminars for them. So you could kind of consider it as homework. Some modules are self-taught modules, so you have to learn the content yourself. You get one tutorial sheet each week from each module except for the self-taught ones, for that you get a booklet that you're expected to have completed by the end of the semester.
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    (Original post by Shadez)
    Ooooh me me pick me
    1.
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    Pretty intense I'd say, you will not be as free as your liberal art or social science friends to say the least. However with good time management there will be sufficient time to enjoy yourself outside of university. Hmm to give a comparison I would say the first few months took a LOT of getting used to(way harder than my two years at A-level combined), over time though you do build up resistance to it and get used to it. Having said all that I've been told second year is a nightmare :afraid:
    2.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Well it depends on what university you go to. In first year at my university we have labs every two weeks.The labs work are assessed in three ways namely interviews, posters or lab reports. Every lab the assessment method changes.

    Practicals vary however they usually go hand in hand with the lecture content, since it is the first year for me its on basic principles in chemical engineering such as mass & energy balances, fluid flow in pipes, heat transfer. So namely topics in fluid mechanics, heat transfer and energy balances as well as a few other topics that I can't remember (Practicals are however WAAAY better than those crappy titration ones you do in chemistry)

    Average lecture is taught two ways either in a 3 hour block where two hours is lecture and 1 hour is a tutorial or a 1 hour lecture 1 hour tutorial with one more hour an another day, usually the following day.
    3.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    So far I've been learning the underlying principle in transport phenomena so heat transfer and fluid mechanics. You don't learn specific processes per say more the mechanisms in which certain types of processes undergo. Since the chemical engineering industry is huge there would be too many specific processes to learn. We use some of the equipment used in industry however a scaled down versions of them. But it also depends what industry you're talking about since it can vary from oil & gas industry to the pharmaceutical industry.

    Having said that we did a small case study on ammonia production.
    4.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    There are a few people who use laptops to take notes so it would be fine if that's what you prefer. I think the lecture notes are quite sufficient when combined the tutorial sheets and past papers.
    5.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    It all depends on you, even if you went to the best university in the world at most all it would do is put you in the interview chair. After that you're on your own.
    6.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Well tutorials are usually kinda hard and so they're difficult to finish in the one hour seminars for them. So you could kind of consider it as homework. Some modules are self-taught modules, so you have to learn the content yourself. You get one tutorial sheet each week from each module except for the self-taught ones, for that you get a booklet that you're expected to have completed by the end of the semester.
    Thank you very much for the reply! I couldn't find such an insight into the course anywhere else, and thanks to this I shall look forward to *hopefully* starting Chem E in September 2017
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    (Original post by Productivity)
    Thank you very much for the reply! I couldn't find such an insight into the course anywhere else, and thanks to this I shall look forward to *hopefully* starting Chem E in September 2017
    No problem, good luck
 
 
 
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