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    Hey, I'm currently studying AS levels and one of the subjects I study is psychology, which I really enjoy and realised I want to have a career in psychology. But I'm slightly confused..what training do I have to go through to become a clinical psychologist? Also, how competitive is this field?


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    (Original post by arr18)
    Hey, I'm currently studying AS levels and one of the subjects I study is psychology, which I really enjoy and realised I want to have a career in psychology. But I'm slightly confused..what training do I have to go through to become a clinical psychologist? Also, how competitive is this field?


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    The training to become a Clinical Psychologist usually takes around 6 years of further study. To become a Clinical Psychologist you would firstly need to complete a BPS accredited BSc in Psychology with a 2:1 or above.

    Most postgraduate courses usually require 1 years relevant work experience, so most tend to do this between undergraduate and postgraduate training.

    You would then need to do a doctorate in Clinical Psychology which takes 3 years but you would be paid a salary whilst doing this training (usually at NHS agenda for change band 6, about £25k).

    Clinical Psychology is very competitive. According to the Leeds Clearing House, the success rate for application was around 16% (1 in 6) in 2015. But if you are really passionate and are 100% sure it is what you want to do then don't let this put you off! There are ways of making yourself stand out in your application that will give you a greater chance of getting a place on a doctorate, such as more work experience or doing the MSc in Clinical Psychology first.
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    (Original post by sarahja)
    The training to become a Clinical Psychologist usually takes around 6 years of further study. To become a Clinical Psychologist you would firstly need to complete a BPS accredited BSc in Psychology with a 2:1 or above.

    Most postgraduate courses usually require 1 years relevant work experience, so most tend to do this between undergraduate and postgraduate training.

    You would then need to do a doctorate in Clinical Psychology which takes 3 years but you would be paid a salary whilst doing this training (usually at NHS agenda for change band 6, about £25k).

    Clinical Psychology is very competitive. According to the Leeds Clearing House, the success rate for application was around 16% (1 in 6) in 2015. But if you are really passionate and are 100% sure it is what you want to do then don't let this put you off! There are ways of making yourself stand out in your application that will give you a greater chance of getting a place on a doctorate, such as more work experience or doing the MSc in Clinical Psychology first.
    Okay thank you so much! It does seem difficult to get into but I am really interested in it.


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    (Original post by sarahja)
    The training to become a Clinical Psychologist usually takes around 6 years of further study. To become a Clinical Psychologist you would firstly need to complete a BPS accredited BSc in Psychology with a 2:1 or above.

    Most postgraduate courses usually require 1 years relevant work experience, so most tend to do this between undergraduate and postgraduate training.

    You would then need to do a doctorate in Clinical Psychology which takes 3 years but you would be paid a salary whilst doing this training (usually at NHS agenda for change band 6, about £25k).

    Clinical Psychology is very competitive. According to the Leeds Clearing House, the success rate for application was around 16% (1 in 6) in 2015. But if you are really passionate and are 100% sure it is what you want to do then don't let this put you off! There are ways of making yourself stand out in your application that will give you a greater chance of getting a place on a doctorate, such as more work experience or doing the MSc in Clinical Psychology first.
    Just to add a few points to the above:

    I think Sarah is counting the BSc in the 6 year estimate, if so, then it is probably a slight underestimate. Generally the minimum required relevant clinical experience is 1 year (though some courses will take people with no experience, there are only one or two). Most candidates will have 2-4 years. It is not impossible to get on the doctorate straight out of the BSc, but in terms of planning a career, I'd expect to be on the clinical doctorate between 25-27. If you get on earlier, then bonus, but of course, it might take longer.

    As far as I'm aware, the Clinical Psychology MSc's doesn't add any overall weight to your application, in and of itself, compared to any other Psychology MSc. The places that list their shortlisting criteria (Sheffield and Newcastle, for example) either score a point for having one, or don't mention it at all. Not that the Clinical Psychology MSc's are worthless, of course, just you don't have to limit yourself to that particular one.
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    (Original post by _Sinnie_)
    Just to add a few points to the above:

    I think Sarah is counting the BSc in the 6 year estimate, if so, then it is probably a slight underestimate. Generally the minimum required relevant clinical experience is 1 year (though some courses will take people with no experience, there are only one or two). Most candidates will have 2-4 years. It is not impossible to get on the doctorate straight out of the BSc, but in terms of planning a career, I'd expect to be on the clinical doctorate between 25-27. If you get on earlier, then bonus, but of course, it might take longer.

    As far as I'm aware, the Clinical Psychology MSc's doesn't add any overall weight to your application, in and of itself, compared to any other Psychology MSc. The places that list their shortlisting criteria (Sheffield and Newcastle, for example) either score a point for having one, or don't mention it at all. Not that the Clinical Psychology MSc's are worthless, of course, just you don't have to limit yourself to that particular one.
    Oh okay thank you! So it'll take longer than 6 years? Also, would you therefore recommend more than one years work experience? Those with more experience will have better chances won't they?


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    (Original post by arr18)
    Hey, I'm currently studying AS levels and one of the subjects I study is psychology, which I really enjoy and realised I want to have a career in psychology. But I'm slightly confused..what training do I have to go through to become a clinical psychologist? Also, how competitive is this field?


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    And how does that make you feel?


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    The problem is, there is no definitive right answer, which is why I don't think you should put a time frame on it as you will end up disappointed if it doesn't come about.

    The fundamental criteria the DClinPsy courses use to determine who gets a place is, 'whether you're ready to train as a Clinical Psychologist'. If that sounds nice and wishy washy, that's because it is. Lancaster don't read your application form and administer a general ability test and shortlist for interviews off that, Newcastle shortlist through a strict academic criteria, Sheffield cover academic, clinical and references in their shortlisting. Some courses like you to be very reflective, some academic. This makes it difficult to recommend any single route.

    The key skill you learn as you gain experience is reflection - to look at what you did, why you did it, what the outcomes were and to consider what it all means, what worked and what you might do differently. So more clinical experience provides you with more to draw on when applying/interviewing.

    There are trainee's who applied and got onto the course straight from undergraduate, some do an MSc, PhD and then get on, some work for IAPT, most work as Assistant Psychologist or research assistants - of these, some do one year and others 6 or more. Other people have worked as support workers, drugs and alcohol workers or in homeless shelters. Some trainees have never met a 'service user' before while others have delivered various types of therapy.

    What each person does have in common is that they can show that what they have learned, wherever that was, has helped them grow as a reflective practitioner and that they can apply that to the clinical and research settings they will encounter as a trainee.

    Check these out:
    http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/forum/view...hp?f=32&t=8733
    http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/forum/view...php?f=32&t=145
    http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/forum/view...hp?f=32&t=8809
    Also google the BPS website for the 'alternative handbook' - it should be available for free. That breaks down which trainees are on each course.

    The ClinPsy forum is the hangout for Psychology. This thread http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/forum/view...p?f=32&t=19316 is where everyone tracks their current progress on applying.
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    If you take a look at this website, it breaks down the age range https://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp/BasicEqualopps2014.html

    Also by the time the OP is in a position to apply it's likely the age range may even skew higher due to increased number of applications and the ongoing inflation in experience required. In some ways this is good, as the job benefits from greater maturity and broader experiences, but it is something to bear in mind if the OP envisages getting through the system by their early twenties.
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    What job would running workshops come under? I've always found the people who do workshops for this sort of thing at schools really interesting people.
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    (Original post by _Sinnie_)
    The problem is, there is no definitive right answer, which is why I don't think you should put a time frame on it as you will end up disappointed if it doesn't come about.

    The fundamental criteria the DClinPsy courses use to determine who gets a place is, 'whether you're ready to train as a Clinical Psychologist'. If that sounds nice and wishy washy, that's because it is. Lancaster don't read your application form and administer a general ability test and shortlist for interviews off that, Newcastle shortlist through a strict academic criteria, Sheffield cover academic, clinical and references in their shortlisting. Some courses like you to be very reflective, some academic. This makes it difficult to recommend any single route.

    The key skill you learn as you gain experience is reflection - to look at what you did, why you did it, what the outcomes were and to consider what it all means, what worked and what you might do differently. So more clinical experience provides you with more to draw on when applying/interviewing.

    There are trainee's who applied and got onto the course straight from undergraduate, some do an MSc, PhD and then get on, some work for IAPT, most work as Assistant Psychologist or research assistants - of these, some do one year and others 6 or more. Other people have worked as support workers, drugs and alcohol workers or in homeless shelters. Some trainees have never met a 'service user' before while others have delivered various types of therapy.

    What each person does have in common is that they can show that what they have learned, wherever that was, has helped them grow as a reflective practitioner and that they can apply that to the clinical and research settings they will encounter as a trainee.

    Check these out:
    http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/forum/view...hp?f=32&t=8733
    http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/forum/view...php?f=32&t=145
    http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/forum/view...hp?f=32&t=8809
    Also google the BPS website for the 'alternative handbook' - it should be available for free. That breaks down which trainees are on each course.

    The ClinPsy forum is the hangout for Psychology. This thread http://www.clinpsy.org.uk/forum/view...p?f=32&t=19316 is where everyone tracks their current progress on applying.
    Thank you, things are clearer and I now have a better understanding about the career


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    (Original post by Lord Asriel)
    If you take a look at this website, it breaks down the age range https://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp/BasicEqualopps2014.html

    Also by the time the OP is in a position to apply it's likely the age range may even skew higher due to increased number of applications and the ongoing inflation in experience required. In some ways this is good, as the job benefits from greater maturity and broader experiences, but it is something to bear in mind if the OP envisages getting through the system by their early twenties.
    Thank you, that is useful


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    (Original post by heineken)
    And how does that make you feel?


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    How does what make me feel?


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