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    I know that there are different levels of uni: masters, research, diploma, Bachelor, MBA, PhD.

    But what do each mean, and how do I know which one i should choose?
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    (Original post by Mir.I.Am)
    I know that there are different levels of uni: masters, research, diploma, Bachelor, MBA, PhD.

    But what do each mean, and how do I know which one i should choose?
    If you're just leaving school then you'll be applying for undergraduate courses - usually these are Bachelors (BA, BSc, LLB in the UK) but, especially in science and engineering, it's also possible to take "enhanced" undergraduate degrees (MEng, MMath, MSci). And the situation is slightly different in Scotland.

    Masters (MA, MSc, LLM, MBA) courses are postgraduate - you take them AFTER you have graduated from your undergraduate degree. These are taught courses - so like undergraduate degrees you take exams and submit coursework.

    For both Bachelors and Masters courses it's often possible to get an award if you only complete part of the work. These go
    UG: Certificate of HE/CertHE/HNC (generally equivalent to 1 year of a 3 year degree) followed by Diploma of HE/DipHE/HND (generally equivalent to 2 years of a 3 year degree)
    PG: PGCert (PGCE is a specific type of PGCert) followed by PGDip (GDL is a specific type of PGDiploma)

    A PhD (and also an MPhil and an MRes) is a postgraduate research degree. Instead of following a curriculum and submitting coursework/taking exams that are marked you choose and research a specific topic. A PhD lasts 3-4 years full time (at least) and is a Doctorate - meaning you can call yourself Dr if you get one. Because of the nature of the work you're usually embedded in a research group with academic staff who are carrying research on similar topics. A number of those academic staff will be your supervisors - someone who guides you through and gives you feedback and advice on how you're doing. PhDs are closer to employment on a very specialised project than to taught education.
 
 
 
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