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    Hey, Im starting uni next year.
    I get 9k uni loans for uni fees which goes straight to uni. Do i have to pay any more tuition fees or costs after this?
    I get 8k for maintenance. My accomodation is 7k from students unite. So i have 1000 pounds to live off but ill get a job as soon as I can. I just want to know often do i get paid my maintenance loan? How many installments?
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    You get three instalments. The first one is mid October, the second is early January and the third is early April.
    First instalment = £1000
    Second instalment = £1000
    Third = whatever remains

    I dint accommodate myself, but my friend does and she had to pay accommodation fees upfront for the first semester (about £1200, and she's in low quality, cheaper accommodation) - before the first instalment.

    I'm not sure about when she paid for the second semester.

    Also the phrase "I'll get a job as soon as I can"....if you don't have a part time job already assume you won't in uni. Most places won't hire without experience and you can't just assume you'll get a job right away.

    And you don't have to pay any more tuition fees, but you will have to pay for printing, travel home, and books can cost £40 or more. You'll also have to pay for food, and my friend says it can cost her £100 or more a week.

    Tbh, as someone who wanted to move away this time last year but ended up staying cause I didn't think I'd have the money, I don't think living in accommodation is worth it. You read online that most students do it, but honestly it's probably about 1/4 of first year students who do. It costs a lot and while the experience does look great, you do question if it's worth the money. Another friend I know has to ask her parents for £200 every month to help her with the cost of it all.

    Plus the government are already cutting grants and I can see them cutting maintenance loans down. Not getting rid of them, but definitely see them reducing the amount of money you get.

    My advice is unless you get a part time job within the next month (which could be transferred to a place near the accommodation, I.e. retail/fast food chain companies) you won't be able to afford to live away.

    If you are desperate to, go somewhere which is about an hour away from where you currently live. That way you can stay at home during second and third years.
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    (Original post by Runescapian)
    You get three instalments. The first one is mid October, the second is early January and the third is early April.
    First instalment = £1000
    Second instalment = £1000
    Third = whatever remains

    I dint accommodate myself, but my friend does and she had to pay accommodation fees upfront for the first semester (about £1200, and she's in low quality, cheaper accommodation) - before the first instalment.

    I'm not sure about when she paid for the second semester.

    Also the phrase "I'll get a job as soon as I can"....if you don't have a part time job already assume you won't in uni. Most places won't hire without experience and you can't just assume you'll get a job right away.

    And you don't have to pay any more tuition fees, but you will have to pay for printing, travel home, and books can cost £40 or more. You'll also have to pay for food, and my friend says it can cost her £100 or more a week.

    Tbh, as someone who wanted to move away this time last year but ended up staying cause I didn't think I'd have the money, I don't think living in accommodation is worth it. You read online that most students do it, but honestly it's probably about 1/4 of first year students who do. It costs a lot and while the experience does look great, you do question if it's worth the money. Another friend I know has to ask her parents for £200 every month to help her with the cost of it all.

    Plus the government are already cutting grants and I can see them cutting maintenance loans down. Not getting rid of them, but definitely see them reducing the amount of money you get.

    My advice is unless you get a part time job within the next month (which could be transferred to a place near the accommodation, I.e. retail/fast food chain companies) you won't be able to afford to live away.

    If you are desperate to, go somewhere which is about an hour away from where you currently live. That way you can stay at home during second and third years.
    It is perfectly do able, so many students live in accommodation and cope just fine.
    There is absolutely no need to spend £100 per week on food, if you are living on a budget £25/£30 is plenty every week.

    Throughout my whole degree I don't think I met a single person who lived at home. I would say a lot more rent accommodation than you are saying.

    Also the loan is paid in more or less 3 equal installments, the final one is slightly larger. The first is usually the start of october (after your first few days at uni).

    Part of uni is about being independent, learning new skills and coping away from home. You will need to get a job based on your finances but plenty of people do. Learn to budget and you will be absolutely fine.

    Student halls are one of the best bits about uni if you like socialising, going out etc.
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    (Original post by Runescapian)
    You get three instalments. The first one is mid October, the second is early January and the third is early April.
    First instalment = £1000
    Second instalment = £1000
    Third = whatever remains

    I dint accommodate myself, but my friend does and she had to pay accommodation fees upfront for the first semester (about £1200, and she's in low quality, cheaper accommodation) - before the first instalment.

    I'm not sure about when she paid for the second semester.

    Also the phrase "I'll get a job as soon as I can"....if you don't have a part time job already assume you won't in uni. Most places won't hire without experience and you can't just assume you'll get a job right away.

    And you don't have to pay any more tuition fees, but you will have to pay for printing, travel home, and books can cost £40 or more. You'll also have to pay for food, and my friend says it can cost her £100 or more a week.

    Tbh, as someone who wanted to move away this time last year but ended up staying cause I didn't think I'd have the money, I don't think living in accommodation is worth it. You read online that most students do it, but honestly it's probably about 1/4 of first year students who do. It costs a lot and while the experience does look great, you do question if it's worth the money. Another friend I know has to ask her parents for £200 every month to help her with the cost of it all.

    Plus the government are already cutting grants and I can see them cutting maintenance loans down. Not getting rid of them, but definitely see them reducing the amount of money you get.

    My advice is unless you get a part time job within the next month (which could be transferred to a place near the accommodation, I.e. retail/fast food chain companies) you won't be able to afford to live away.

    If you are desperate to, go somewhere which is about an hour away from where you currently live. That way you can stay at home during second and third years.
    Firstly if OP will be getting £8000 from student finance in total then they clearly will be getting more than £1,000 in each installment.

    Your friend must be buying caviar and lobster because I bought a lot of meat and I never spent more than £25 a week on food.

    And I have to agree with milliemogs that you've underestimated the number of people who move out for uni- during my undergraduate degree I met a grand total of 3 commuters. It makes it so much easier to participate in uni life living out. And not everyone has a uni they like an hour away.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    Firstly if OP will be getting £8000 from student finance in total then they clearly will be getting more than £1,000 in each installment.

    Your friend must be buying caviar and lobster because I bought a lot of meat and I never spent more than £25 a week on food.

    And I have to agree with milliemogs that you've underestimated the number of people who move out for uni- during my undergraduate degree I met a grand total of 3 commuters. It makes it so much easier to participate in uni life living out. And not everyone has a uni they like an hour away.
    Thanks for taking the time to reply. Its much appreciated!!
    ill be getting 8k from maintenance loan
    and a further 2k from my uni.
    If i spend 6-7k on uni.
    Will 3k be enough to live off until i find a job?
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    thanks for all your replys. Much appreciated x
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    (Original post by ALEXIS120)
    Thanks for taking the time to reply. Its much appreciated!!
    ill be getting 8k from maintenance loan
    and a further 2k from my uni.
    If i spend 6-7k on uni.
    Will 3k be enough to live off until i find a job?
    Assuming you work out a budget and don't blow your money in one go, £3k for the year should be enough. However your accomodation is very pricey, will you be in London?
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    Assuming you work out a budget and don't blow your money in one go, £3k for the year should be enough. However your accomodation is very pricey, will you be in London?
    Ill be at uni of Leeds. I'm paying for an en suite room for 6500 a year. Im currently looking for cheaper accommodation... The average accommodation in halls is around 5-6k. Are you renting privately?
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    (Original post by ALEXIS120)
    Ill be at uni of Leeds. I'm paying for an en suite room for 6500 a year. Im currently looking for cheaper accommodation... The average accommodation in halls is around 5-6k. Are you renting privately?
    Ouch, looking at the Leeds price list you can still get ensuite in most halls for a grand less than that if you go self catered. Have you already signed a contract for the first hall though? I'm now back home after finishing uni and before that I was in another city.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    Ouch, looking at the Leeds price list you can still get ensuite in most halls for a grand less than that if you go self catered. Have you already signed a contract for the first hall though? I'm now back home after finishing uni and before that I was in another city.
    I will be going self catered as I can cook food i like. It makes the experience better i think. thanks for the advice. How was uni. what course did u take?
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    (Original post by ALEXIS120)
    I will be going self catered as I can cook food i like. It makes the experience better i think. thanks for the advice. How was uni. what course did u take?
    Oh definitley, I agree self catered is the way to go. I had a couple of hiccups but overall had a good time, I studied International Relations.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    Oh definitley, I agree self catered is the way to go. I had a couple of hiccups but overall had a good time, I studied International Relations.
    What kind of hiccups if you dont mind me asking?
    Im doing business management. I wish you all the best for the future!
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    (Original post by ALEXIS120)
    What kind of hiccups if you dont mind me asking?
    Im doing business management. I wish you all the best for the future!
    To do with people I lived with.
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    (Original post by milliemogs)
    It is perfectly do able, so many students live in accommodation and cope just fine.
    There is absolutely no need to spend £100 per week on food, if you are living on a budget £25/£30 is plenty every week.

    Throughout my whole degree I don't think I met a single person who lived at home. I would say a lot more rent accommodation than you are saying.

    Also the loan is paid in more or less 3 equal installments, the final one is slightly larger. The first is usually the start of october (after your first few days at uni).

    Part of uni is about being independent, learning new skills and coping away from home. You will need to get a job based on your finances but plenty of people do. Learn to budget and you will be absolutely fine.

    Student halls are one of the best bits about uni if you like socialising, going out etc.
    yeah I agree things like pasta and sauce pasta bake (with tuna and cheese mmmm) stir fry those Mexican box meals and things £25-£30 would be a push particularly if you shop when all the reduced stuff is put out.
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    (Original post by ALEXIS120)
    Thanks for taking the time to reply. Its much appreciated!!
    ill be getting 8k from maintenance loan
    and a further 2k from my uni.
    If i spend 6-7k on uni.
    Will 3k be enough to live off until i find a job?
    £3000 will be tight but doable, and if you're able to get a job to help with your living expenses that will be even better. Most unis advise you not to work more than 12-16 hours a week in term time, but obviously you can work more hours in the holidays. A lot of people find it hard to keep up with a job and their workload in third year, so it's a good idea to save up some money for third year as well.

    However, you won't get your first installment of your loan until you've enrolled at the uni. Most accommodation will require a deposit before this point, and there are likely be other incidental costs with moving etc. You'll also need to cover your living expenses up to this point and because it'll be fresher's week you'll want a bit of money for going out etc. Have you thought about how you're going to cover these costs?

    The uni I went to also didn't pay bursaries at the start of term. It was split into two installments and paid in Novemeber and at the end of February, so don't assume you'll get the £2000 straight away.

    The other thing is emergencies. If you're living on a very tight budget, you need a plan to cover emergencies- for example if something vital breaks, or you need to travel home at short notice. You'll also probably need to pay a deposit on your second year accommodation (plus agency fees) before your second year loan comes in. Would your family be able to help out at all in these situations? Alternatively, have you thought about getting an overdraft?

    It might be a good idea to see if you can find a summer job this year so you've got a bit of money saved up before you start.
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    it would be better if you could find cheaper accommodation, having extra money to live on will make a bigger difference than having a slightly bigger bedroom! but £3kish should be doable, just work out a budget for yourself in advance so you know what you can be spending and make sure you stick to it so you're not panicking later in the year! You absolutely cannot rely on getting a part time job, it might happen but it might not so budget as if it wont and then if you find one then that money can be for 'fun' stuff. When writing a budget make sure you include money to travel home, some spare cash for over summer, money for a deposit both for this year and for next year (this will have to be paid before summer), extra cash for during freshers week, christmas presents, new clothes you might need etc and have plans for emergency spending, ideally this means having some savings but if you're sensible with money your emergency money could be your overdraft... don't worry about expensive books and stuff, almost everything can be bought second hand or found in the library, I only needed to buy one book during my whole degree...

    Ignore the other poster, you absolutely do not need £100 a week and the majority of people will be in halls. I found about £60 a week was a good general budget, this meant I could have a generous food shop allowance and basically eat anything I wanted and still have plenty left to have fun with. I never felt I was restricting myself too much on that budget!
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    it would be better if you could find cheaper accommodation, having extra money to live on will make a bigger difference than having a slightly bigger bedroom! but £3kish should be doable, just work out a budget for yourself in advance so you know what you can be spending and make sure you stick to it so you're not panicking later in the year! You absolutely cannot rely on getting a part time job, it might happen but it might not so budget as if it wont and then if you find one then that money can be for 'fun' stuff. When writing a budget make sure you include money to travel home, some spare cash for over summer, money for a deposit both for this year and for next year (this will have to be paid before summer), extra cash for during freshers week, christmas presents, new clothes you might need etc and have plans for emergency spending, ideally this means having some savings but if you're sensible with money your emergency money could be your overdraft... don't worry about expensive books and stuff, almost everything can be bought second hand or found in the library, I only needed to buy one book during my whole degree...

    Ignore the other poster, you absolutely do not need £100 a week and the majority of people will be in halls. I found about £60 a week was a good general budget, this meant I could have a generous food shop allowance and basically eat anything I wanted and still have plenty left to have fun with. I never felt I was restricting myself too much on that budget!
    I agree that even saving yourself £500 on accommodation could make quite a big difference over the course of the year- that might pay for your travel home for the year, for example.

    I agree that you don't need to pay for textbooks, but you do need to budget an amount for stationery costs, printing costs etc- or if you're planning to take notes using a notebook/tablet, you need to be able to replace that at short notice, which is probably going to be more expensive.

    Depending on the course, you may also need to buy some equipment e.g. I was required to buy a lab coat and safety goggles + I needed suitable footwear for field trips. For humanities courses, these sorts of costs won't apply!
 
 
 
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