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    it was hilarious end of
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    Glad the description clarifies it was in the House of Commons because I'd been certain we were watching a Year 9 class.

    Honestly, so glad these people are holding so much responsibility in terms of the running of our country. So glad.

    (Original post by xXShaniqua420Xx)
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    (Original post by Zargabaath)
    But that's not the real reason is it? If it was a Labour MP saying this to Cameron, I seriously doubt you'd have a problem with it.
    To be fair, Zarga, I'd find it equally as rude if it were Cameron.

    The verbal quip, sure - but the fact they continued to laugh much longer than necessary as Corbyn repeatedly tried to continue?

    Although I agree on the other countries front - definitely heard of a lot worse things.
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    (Original post by will_cash)
    You obviously don't understand economics yourself, if you don't realise that there are multiple, equally valid stances, which can be taken on economics.

    Just because Corbyn's economics isn't as capitalist as you may want it to be, doesn't invalidate it, in fact, if you knew your economic history, you would know that the period of greatest success for capitalism was when it was most like Corbyn's economics. Of course I am referring to the Golden age of capitalism, which was to a great extent brought about by the work of John Maynard Keynes, whose school of Economic thought, based on demand side policy such as investment and increased expenditure, is what Corbyn chooses to follow.
    Corbyn's misunderstandings of economics have little to do with his socialist ideals.

    And no, the post-war boom was not the greatest period of capitalist success - that would be, as far as we know according to evidence, the 19th century, and mostly before Keynes was born. Corbyn is not a Keynesian either - although such a word is a misnomer as Keynes himself said that his economic theory should have been confined to the depression and subsequently rethought. Unfortunately he died shortly after seeing his ideas corrupted.
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    (Original post by acupofgreentea)
    To be fair, Zarga, I'd find it equally as rude if it were Cameron.

    The verbal quip, sure - but the fact they continued to laugh much longer than necessary as Corbyn repeatedly tried to continue?

    Although I agree on the other countries front - definitely heard of a lot worse things.
    Yeah, you could tell they were deliberately prolonging their laughter to try and unnerve him. However, I think if you're a politician, you do need the mental strength to be able to deal with situations like this and Corbyn did handle it well.

    Tbh I love seeing politicians squirm, Labour or Tory :lol:
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    (Original post by george-90)
    Corbyn's misunderstandings of economics have little to do with his socialist ideals.

    And no, the post-war boom was not the greatest period of capitalist success - that would be, as far as we know according to evidence, the 19th century, and mostly before Keynes was born. Corbyn is not a Keynesian either - although such a word is a misnomer as Keynes himself said that his economic theory should have been confined to the depression and subsequently rethought. Unfortunately he died shortly after seeing his ideas corrupted.
    Keynes' view was that his policies should be implemented in times of recovery. We are still most certainly in a period of recovery from 2008, as the recovery this time around has been much slower than in the 1930s. Perhaps "economic" success in the 19th century was greater than what we know as the Golden age, but this was hardly down to the Capitalist/neoliberal policy that you appear to be advocating. The protestant ethic of reinvesting almost all of your income, as implied by John Calvin as a sign of one's predestination to paradise, was what caused Capitalism to be so successful in this time. It was employing money as it should be, as a transient form which commodities become in the buying and selling of such commodities. However in a time where wealth is sought after, and money is kept in this transient state, the capitalist policies no longer work, as money has lost its only real purpose. Not to mention child labour and abhorrent working conditions which were rife in 19th century society, which I can't imagine even the harshest of Capitalists would support.
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    (Original post by Jamie S)
    No, I'd be impressed then high five them.
    Says more about you
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    (Original post by will_cash)
    Keynes' view was that his policies should be implemented in times of recovery. We are still most certainly in a period of recovery from 2008, as the recovery this time around has been much slower than in the 1930s. Perhaps "economic" success in the 19th century was greater than what we know as the Golden age, but this was hardly down to the Capitalist/neoliberal policy that you appear to be advocating. The protestant ethic of reinvesting almost all of your income, as implied by John Calvin as a sign of one's predestination to paradise, was what caused Capitalism to be so successful in this time. It was employing money as it should be, as a transient form which commodities become in the buying and selling of such commodities. However in a time where wealth is sought after, and money is kept in this transient state, the capitalist policies no longer work, as money has lost its only real purpose. Not to mention child labour and abhorrent working conditions which were rife in 19th century society, which I can't imagine even the harshest of Capitalists would support.
    I'm not advocating any policy. Where have you got that idea from?

    What is a harsh capitalist? State-run factories would have been just the same or worse. Working conditions were a result of circumstance, not capitalism. A combination of technology, opportunity cost, education, economies of scale, etc. formed the working conditions of the era. Standards of living improved massively, I don't think it is harsh to support that. All this is besides the point.
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    (Original post by iEthan)
    They're throwing around "your mum" jokes now. Look: https://www.facebook.com/BuzzFeedUKP...69341499811352 — sorry for source, only one I could currently find.Absolutely pathetic. With Cameron resorting to ad homs now.
    To be fair, after the Labour MP shouted 'Ask your mother' I thought Cameron's response was much better than simply standing saying 'No...no' as Corbyn did after he was heckled.
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    (Original post by MrDystopia)
    To be fair, after the Labour MP shouted 'Ask your mother' I thought Cameron's response was much better than simply standing saying 'No...no' as Corbyn did after he was heckled.
    I won't argue with you there. Then again, were either of the comments truly necessary in a meeting of people that are supposed to be running the country?
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    (Original post by iEthan)
    I won't argue with you there. Then again, were either of the comments truly necessary in a meeting of people that are supposed to be running the country?
    Of course they weren't necessary. But I think people read too much into it. Simple one liners, sometimes a quick witted response, loads of laughter and nonsensical chanting..a staple of Parliament that happens from time to time:lol:
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    I'm no Corbyn supporter but Corbyn is the only well behaved person in that house. The Tories are despicable and every time I watch PMQs I realise how childish and immature Tories really are, whether Corbyn is being attacked or their own like Boris.
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    (Original post by offhegoes)
    Says more about you
    Life's too short to be mature.
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    (Original post by acupofgreentea)
    Glad the description clarifies it was in the House of Commons because I'd been certain we were watching a Year 9 class.

    Honestly, so glad these people are holding so much responsibility in terms of the running of our country. So glad.



    RIP 420 AD.
    I was going to say something about Corbyn perhaps not having a sense of humour, but then I remembered that he clearly does as he was on the editorial board of a magazine which made multiple jokes about the victims of the Brighton IRA terrorist attack right after it happened. His sense of humour is very high brow and refined compared to this joke in Parliament this week.

    "Who are you?" = immature and unacceptable.

    Mocking dead people and Norman Tebbit's injuries (and also his wife's who was left permanently disabled as a result of the attack. One of the jokes was specifically mocking the Tebbits' injuries. Hilarious!) = acceptable according to Corbyn.

    Not to my personal taste but I'm sure you'll agree that "What do you call four (four Conservatives died in the bombing) dead Tories? A start.” is an absolute howler. Take a bow, Son.

    Of course I'm being facetious, but you lot really are crying over nothing.
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    Lefties will complain about the maturity of the people making the comments, until it's against the Tories, then they'll gladly join in.
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    (Original post by Dinasaurus)
    Lefties will complain about the maturity of the people making the comments, until it's against the Tories, then they'll gladly join in.
    Undoubtedly true about quite a few of these people. The type who have no problem giving it out but cry to mummy when they get it back.
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    I'm centre-left and dislike Corbyn as Labour Leader but it is apparent to me that he will always show a level of respect which is rarely reciprocated by the government, I empathize with him because of this but I feel a more centrist leader would put the Party in a stronger position. At the current point in time Labour have little chance of winning the next election.
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    It won't be long before they get rid of him as he is kind of a liability for labour
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    (Original post by karl pilkington)
    It won't be long before they get rid if him as he is kind of a liability for labour
    Too many associations are controlled by momentum for that

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