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    Good luck guys hope you all do well.
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    In part b of this question, why do we assume that the particle reaches a maximum height and then comes back down?

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    Anyone done M1 June 2015? Decent paper I thought.
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    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    Attachment 545023

    Where does it say that?
    On here 2C=A
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    (Original post by Marccs)
    On here 2C=A
    Yeah; he set the tension at A as Tn, and so the tension at C will be 2Tn, since it is double the tension at A.
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    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    In part b of this question, why do we assume that the particle reaches a maximum height and then comes back down?

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    Where do you find these papers?
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    (Original post by RedDevil1997)
    Where do you find these papers?
    http://madasmaths.com/archive/maths_...kinematics.pdf
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    Thankyou 😃
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    If a particle is on the point of slipping down a plane, but is still in equilibrium, would that make the forces going down the slope be F = ma, or F = 0 ?
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    (Original post by amelienine)
    If a particle is on the point of slipping down a plane, but is still in equilibrium, would that make the forces going down the slope be F = ma, or F = 0 ?
    F=0
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    (Original post by Marxist)
    F=0
    thank you, so they only state that it's on the point of slipping down the plane to show which direction friction is right?
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    (Original post by amelienine)
    thank you, so they only that it's on the point of slipping down the plane to show which direction friction is right?
    I don't understand your question. Do you mean which direction friction is acting in? If it's on the point of slipping down the plane, It would act up the plane. Friction opposes motion, so if it was on the point of slipping up the plane it would oppose the motion - acting down the plane.
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    (Original post by amelienine)
    If a particle is on the point of slipping down a plane, but is still in equilibrium, would that make the forces going down the slope be F = ma, or F = 0 ?
    When it says that, it is implying the particle is in equilibrium AND usually there is a frictional force acting in the opposite direction if it is a rough plane
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    (Original post by amelienine)
    thank you, so they only state that it's on the point of slipping down the plane to show which direction friction is right?
    Yeah pretty much
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    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    In part b of this question, why do we assume that the particle reaches a maximum height and then comes back down?

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    Does anyone know?
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    (Original post by Marxist)
    I don't understand your question. Do you mean which direction friction is acting in? If it's on the point of slipping down the plane, It would act up the plane. Friction opposes motion, so if it was on the point of slipping up the plane it would oppose the motion - acting down the plane.
    I wanted to clarify if the only reason they're giving that piece of information - that's it's on the point of slipping down the plane - is to show which direction friction is acting in. Thank you!
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    (Original post by amelienine)
    I wanted to clarify if the only reason they're giving that piece of information - that's it's on the point of slipping down the plane - is to show which direction friction is acting in. Thank you!
    Precisely, that's exactly what they want you to know.
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    I'm starting a levels this year ... Should I do stats or mechanics ? What's the difference?


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    (Original post by IAROX15)
    Its funny because they allow answers in terms of 'g'
    If you use 9.8, you've made an approximation so shouldn't give an exact answer.

    If you keep the letter g in, you haven't made an approximation.
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    (Original post by dance25)
    I'm starting a levels this year ... Should I do stats or mechanics ? What's the difference?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    well stats is boring af
 
 
 
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