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    I'm 17, and having worked in Marketing and Fundraising for the past 2 years and involved myself in environmental and sustainability projects, I have realised what I would like to do with my life.

    I want to study Politics at University and I am going to College starting September to study Gov & Pol, Philosophy, Sociology and Law. I would love to go to University but the tuition fees are putting me off (I'll spend the next 2-3 years campaigning for them to be reduced!), and actually terrifying me.

    What ways can you fund for university other than student loans?
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    Do you realise that you don't have to pay the loan back until you're earning £21,000?

    Unless you live in Scotland or have wealthy parents, you should suck it up and get a loan like everyone else.
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    I'm aware of that. It doesn't mean it isn't a lot of money and can be difficult to pay back dependent on my circumstances when I am earning 21'000.

    I don't think your attitude is at all helpful and is actually quite rude. I never said I wasn't going to get a loan, but I would also prefer to take out a smaller loan to reduce the amount of debt I will be in. Tuition fees are ridiculous and NOT right. I would prefer you answer the question instead of being rude.
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    Get a job.
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    (Original post by Shumaya)
    Get a job.
    I have one.
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    (Original post by JackEDeakin)
    I'm aware of that. It doesn't mean it isn't a lot of money and can be difficult to pay back dependent on my circumstances when I am earning 21'000.
    You do realise that it's a tiny percentage every month? If I remember correctly it's something like 3% that's taken automatically if you earn over £21,000. Not difficult to pay back, they don't come knocking at your door demanding the full payment back in one go. You probably won't even pay it all back off in your lifetime.

    Also I would seriously look into a loan. The cost of university is a lot (and I'm going to London!) but the student loans system does make it somewhat accessible for you to go to uni and fund it. If your course is 3 years then that's £27,000 in tuition fees alone - where will you get the money to pay that without student loans? Not to mention your living costs if you stay in accommodation. Even if you live at home you'll still incur costs such as commuting, socialising, course costs such as textbooks and equipment. Unless you're super rich with mummy and daddy paying, I highly doubt you'd be able to afford to afford uni without the student loan system. Besides, even if you started saving now no part or full time job would get you close to that figure presuming all your savings went to that in the two years before uni.

    I'd highly suggest educating yourself more on the student loan system and looking into the cost of you studying at uni (remember London/big cities can be more) before you decide self funding is the best for you. Tuition fees and the cost of living are high but student loans are a necessary evil. If what you get still isn't enough, get a job during your studies as many people do it. You just have to remember you're really not the only one who hates the cost of higher education and you're not the only one who may potentially have to take out loans to afford it.
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    (Original post by smozsolution)
    You do realise that it's a tiny percentage every month? If I remember correctly it's something like 3% that's taken automatically if you earn over £21,000. Not difficult to pay back, they don't come knocking at your door demanding the full payment back in one go. You probably won't even pay it all back off in your lifetime.

    Also I would seriously look into a loan. The cost of university is a lot (and I'm going to London!) but the student loans system does make it somewhat accessible for you to go to uni and fund it. If your course is 3 years then that's £27,000 in tuition fees alone - where will you get the money to pay that without student loans? Not to mention your living costs if you stay in accommodation. Even if you live at home you'll still incur costs such as commuting, socialising, course costs such as textbooks and equipment. Unless you're super rich with mummy and daddy paying, I highly doubt you'd be able to afford to afford uni without the student loan system. Besides, even if you started saving now no part or full time job would get you close to that figure presuming all your savings went to that in the two years before uni.

    I'd highly suggest educating yourself more on the student loan system and looking into the cost of you studying at uni (remember London/big cities can be more) before you decide self funding is the best for you. Tuition fees and the cost of living are high but student loans are a necessary evil. If what you get still isn't enough, get a job during your studies as many people do it. You just have to remember you're really not the only one who hates the cost of higher education and you're not the only one who may potentially have to take out loans to afford it.
    Thanks for the reply - I would like to highlight again that I don't expect not to take out Student Loans, I would just love to be able to not have to take out loans to have to pay for everything.
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    (Original post by JackEDeakin)
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    Thanks for the reply - I would like to highlight again that I don't expect not to take out Student Loans, I would just love to be able to not have to take out loans to have to pay for everything.
    Wouldn't we all?

    I think you're just going to have to suck it up like the other user said and take out a loan. Otherwise you can probably forget about higher education unless you have some serious money lying around.
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    If you can't afford to fund it independently then you'll need a loan and a loan you don't have to pay back until you're in work and earning over £21k is pretty good.
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    You can look into bursarys and grants provided by some universitys and other organisations as a way of funding university. This can be for all of your tuition fees lr for part of it.
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    Think of it this way.... Pay the money out of your own pocket and risk that you may never recoup that money later in life as career plans might not work out or you might die.

    Where as if you took the full loan (probably the cheapest loan you'll ever get in your life) and instead put your own money into an isa/savings account/investment and potentially make returns on it and if you don't end up getting a high flying career ow well.


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    There's no quick way to earn the money needed for uni.. Either get a job (restaurant, shop, do some freelance marketing on the side, if you sign up with a babysitting agency you can earn pretty good money £15/hr) or place your bets and gamble to make a quick buck!
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    unless you want to work and save for a loooong time you're probably not going to make a huge dent in the £45k or so you will end up needing
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    You don't start paying it back until you're earning over £21000 per year.

    Then, you pay back 9% of anything you earn over £21k, so if you earned £22k, you'd pay back £90 per year. If you never earn more than £21k, you never pay a penny back. If your income drops below £21k, repayments stop until your income rises again.

    Repayments are based on how much you earn, not how much you owe.

    Anything you haven't paid back after 30 years is wiped off - and many people (potentially the majority) will never pay off their full loans.

    The money comes straight out of your wages in the same way that tax and national insurance does. It isn't possible to get into arrears.

    The repayment system effectively functions like a graduate tax - it's really not something to be scared of.

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    (Original post by JackEDeakin)
    I'm 17, and having worked in Marketing and Fundraising for the past 2 years and involved myself in environmental and sustainability projects, I have realised what I would like to do with my life.

    I want to study Politics at University and I am going to College starting September to study Gov & Pol, Philosophy, Sociology and Law. I would love to go to University but the tuition fees are putting me off (I'll spend the next 2-3 years campaigning for them to be reduced!), and actually terrifying me.

    What ways can you fund for university other than student loans?
    If there was a way to fund university other than through student loans, we would all be doing it.
    Nobody has 27k laying around. If you so desperately want to avoid relying on loans, get a job and save (would take you some years).
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    (Original post by smozsolution)
    You do realise that it's a tiny percentage every month? If I remember correctly it's something like 3% that's taken automatically if you earn over £21,000. Not difficult to pay back, they don't come knocking at your door demanding the full payment back in one go. You probably won't even pay it all back off in your lifetime.

    Also I would seriously look into a loan. The cost of university is a lot (and I'm going to London!) but the student loans system does make it somewhat accessible for you to go to uni and fund it. If your course is 3 years then that's £27,000 in tuition fees alone - where will you get the money to pay that without student loans? Not to mention your living costs if you stay in accommodation. Even if you live at home you'll still incur costs such as commuting, socialising, course costs such as textbooks and equipment. Unless you're super rich with mummy and daddy paying, I highly doubt you'd be able to afford to afford uni without the student loan system. Besides, even if you started saving now no part or full time job would get you close to that figure presuming all your savings went to that in the two years before uni.

    I'd highly suggest educating yourself more on the student loan system and looking into the cost of you studying at uni (remember London/big cities can be more) before you decide self funding is the best for you. Tuition fees and the cost of living are high but student loans are a necessary evil. If what you get still isn't enough, get a job during your studies as many people do it. You just have to remember you're really not the only one who hates the cost of higher education and you're not the only one who may potentially have to take out loans to afford it.
    It's actually 9% FYI
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    (Original post by Dancatpro)
    It's actually 9% FYI
    Thank you for correcting me, I wasn't entirely sure so it's good to know the right figure.
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    (Original post by smozsolution)
    Thank you for correcting me, I wasn't entirely sure so it's good to know the right figure.
    no problemo amigo
 
 
 
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