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    Hello I have a question about Open University Modules. I need to find out if Open University modules that you study part time are classed as whole years when applying for student finance. For example. This year (2015/2016) i have done a computing 30 credit part time module (10 hours a week study). This is the only course I have done this year. The module was £1350 and i studied it over one year. Here is a run down of the Open University modules I have had support for in the past:

    2013/14 - £2562 - Open University Module (Part time study) - Completed
    2014/15 - £1316 - Open University Module (Part time study) - Completed
    2015/16 - £1350 - Open University Module (Part time study) - Still studying (finishes May 2016)

    I want to apply for funding for a full time foundation degree at University of Central Lancashire ( 1st year - 4,000, years 2 to 4 - 9,000 each.

    I guess my question is, are open university modules, even though they are part time study classed as a full years worth of funding? I have only had a total of £5228 of funding in total during the open university over 3 years of study, this is just less than one year full time funding so if i follow the above calculations, i should be entitled to another 4??? but i heard the student finance company don't go off amounts they go off how many years you have studied for???

    Please can someone clear this up for me as I am getting different answers off different people :/
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    Just bumping this as I need to know, as well. In my case, I studied with the OU over two years for 90 credits and about £2000-ish.

    Assuming that my two years of part-time OU study are counted as full years for the purposes of HE funding, would I be correct in thinking that leaves me with two years of remaining loan?

    Seems stupid, really, as 90 credits doesn't even equate to a full year of study.

    Any information will be greatly appreciated.*
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    Its hard to say with the open uni as each case is assessed seperatly. It took me months to sort out but for me to get all my funding for full time uni in sept 2016 I had to drop out of the open university. I had already completed two modules and had almost finished my third to get 120 credits but student finance told me as long as i did not gain any qualification from the open uni my funding for full time education would not be effected. It was hard dropping out as i felt all the work i had done in the previous two modules over the previous two years had gone to waste but I am hoping it will be worth it in the end
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    Well, that sounds quite reassuring then, as my situation is fairly similar to yours. In fact, I had only completed 30 of the 90 credits I had studied for. And one of those modules was a resit, so I think I got a partial fee remission for that as I withdrew while I was still eligible for it. I certainly didn't achieve any qualifications during my time with the OU, so hopefully all should be fine.

    Like you, I feel guilty for quitting the OU, in fact, I feel awful in a way, as I do think very highly of the institution and the module materials were fantastic. Out of interest, what made you decide to drop out? In my case, it was mainly down to the isolating nature of distance study. I suffer from depression and came to realise that this mode of study is completely incompatible with the condition, as it takes a great deal of self-discipline and I found that the support just wasn't there when I needed it. I just couldn't motivate myself to finish modules. I definitely have an increased level of respect for OU graduates.

    Obviously, conventional study also requires commitment, but I just think I'll have a better chance of getting results by being around people rather than isolating myself. The OU is great, but it's definitely for people who are already in the right place, mentally.
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    (Original post by Alex1986)
    Like you, I feel guilty for quitting the OU, in fact, I feel awful in a way, as I do think very highly of the institution and the module materials were fantastic. Out of interest, what made you decide to drop out?

    I do not feel guilty at all. I studied 3 modules in Computing. The first one TU100 My Digital life was ok but I felt most of the course material was irrelevant to someone looking to find a job in computing say, as a network engineer or software developer. The second module was the one I enjoyed the most, MU123 discovering mathematics. The books where extremely well written and the tutor was very helpful. The third module however, TM129 Technologies in practice, the course material was really old and out of date and for one of the units we where given a networking book written in America that had mistakes on almost every third page. That module was certainty NOT worth the £1393 i was charged for it and I complained and demanded a refund but they would not give me one, they only said i could drop out and get a partial refund. This final unit really gave me a bad impression of the future units of the OU so i decided to apply at my local University through UCAS to do a degree and its the best thing i have ever done.

    It was disappointing that the OU did not work for me but like you I also felt that you needed a lot of commitment for distance learning and I never had that while working full time and it showed in some of my assignment scores. Computing is a very practical subject and its very hard to study such a subject at home without constant support and the use of technical equipment which most people don't have access too. I have now quit my job and I am ready to go to University full time. I am 38 years old and if i don't do it now, I never will!!
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    I would speak to student finance. They can give you definitive answer.
 
 
 
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