Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

MEng Chemical Engineering graduate that went into teaching, could I get a grad job? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi,

    Firstly great forum and really interesting to read all the great information!!

    I wanted to ask advice of anyone here who may be able to help. I graduated 5 years ago with a 1st class MEng Chemical Engineering degree (including a 1 year placement with a multinational company) but decided to go straight into teaching.

    I had done lots of work with young people as an undergraduate and felt this was my vocation. However, while I still enjoy elements of teaching 5 years on, the government has changed so much (retirement age, contributions, increased scrutiny etc) that is doesn't feel like the career I want to have my whole life.

    I know that many people go and teach for a period and then go back into industry and feel I should apply to a few graduate engineering opportunities and see how I get on. I am fine with this my require a initial pay cut and some movement in location, but I feel this is something I should have tried BEFORE teaching, but best not to cry over spilt milk as such!!

    It would be great if anyone could offer their advice on all this as I am very confused and just not sure my application would be perceived by perspective graduate employers.

    Thanks in advance.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Confused teacher)
    Hi,

    Firstly great forum and really interesting to read all the great information!!

    I wanted to ask advice of anyone here who may be able to help. I graduated 5 years ago with a 1st class MEng Chemical Engineering degree (including a 1 year placement with a multinational company) but decided to go straight into teaching.

    I had done lots of work with young people as an undergraduate and felt this was my vocation. However, while I still enjoy elements of teaching 5 years on, the government has changed so much (retirement age, contributions, increased scrutiny etc) that is doesn't feel like the career I want to have my whole life.

    I know that many people go and teach for a period and then go back into industry and feel I should apply to a few graduate engineering opportunities and see how I get on. I am fine with this my require a initial pay cut and some movement in location, but I feel this is something I should have tried BEFORE teaching, but best not to cry over spilt milk as such!!

    It would be great if anyone could offer their advice on all this as I am very confused and just not sure my application would be perceived by perspective graduate employers.

    Thanks in advance.
    Are you looking at engineering or just generally?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Confused teacher)
    Hi,

    Firstly great forum and really interesting to read all the great information!!

    I wanted to ask advice of anyone here who may be able to help. I graduated 5 years ago with a 1st class MEng Chemical Engineering degree (including a 1 year placement with a multinational company) but decided to go straight into teaching.

    I had done lots of work with young people as an undergraduate and felt this was my vocation. However, while I still enjoy elements of teaching 5 years on, the government has changed so much (retirement age, contributions, increased scrutiny etc) that is doesn't feel like the career I want to have my whole life.

    I know that many people go and teach for a period and then go back into industry and feel I should apply to a few graduate engineering opportunities and see how I get on. I am fine with this my require a initial pay cut and some movement in location, but I feel this is something I should have tried BEFORE teaching, but best not to cry over spilt milk as such!!

    It would be great if anyone could offer their advice on all this as I am very confused and just not sure my application would be perceived by perspective graduate employers.

    Thanks in advance.
    Have you ever thought about doing a postgraduate diploma as a refresher, then going on to getting a studentship with mphil year at a university? Since you've got a first, you're certainly qualified for it and the teaching experience will certainly help as many universities will as PhD students to supervise seminars and such and even teach a little. My only concern is that you've been away from postgraduate level work for a while, it might take a while to catch back up and of course the cost.

    There's always science journalism if you're interested in writing or lab techs/assistant



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Obviously there's a lot more you could do but actual chem industry jobs are hard to get unless they already know you from an internship or sandwich placement.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Confused teacher)
    Hi,

    Firstly great forum and really interesting to read all the great information!!

    I wanted to ask advice of anyone here who may be able to help. I graduated 5 years ago with a 1st class MEng Chemical Engineering degree (including a 1 year placement with a multinational company) but decided to go straight into teaching.

    I had done lots of work with young people as an undergraduate and felt this was my vocation. However, while I still enjoy elements of teaching 5 years on, the government has changed so much (retirement age, contributions, increased scrutiny etc) that is doesn't feel like the career I want to have my whole life.

    I know that many people go and teach for a period and then go back into industry and feel I should apply to a few graduate engineering opportunities and see how I get on. I am fine with this my require a initial pay cut and some movement in location, but I feel this is something I should have tried BEFORE teaching, but best not to cry over spilt milk as such!!

    It would be great if anyone could offer their advice on all this as I am very confused and just not sure my application would be perceived by perspective graduate employers.

    Thanks in advance.
    I think it depends in what field you want to get. Research & Development is probably hard, but in jobs, where you need to have a lot of people skills, e.g. in production, you could profit from your teaching skills. And there might be also jobs right in the middle, e.g. working in a company, but managing e.g. the apprenticeship programs or caring about the ongoing education of the employees, etc. ...
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you so much for the replies.

    I am looking at either Engineering (more process side, i agree R+D with the time i have had away) or finance, but I apprieciate how competitive this also is.

    I woild rather avoid further study due to current student debt but it is a good suggestion.

    Do you think most Engineering employers would see my teaching experience as a real negative?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    You might find some employers are looking for "recent" graduates (i.e. within the last few years) for their graduate roles, but other than that I don't really know how you'd go about this situation.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Confused teacher)
    Do you think most Engineering employers would see my teaching experience as a real negative?
    Well, even if, as long some see it neutral or as an advantage, you are fine. Your advantage is, that you already have a job, so you can apply without the pressure of having no money. This gets you also in a better position, that someone out of a job, because you can demonstrate work experience in the sense of getting a lot of work done in a stressful environment.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks again for all the kind replies. I know many teach for a few years and then do something else.

    My plan is to send a few applications and see where I stand. If no invites to interview and mainly cold replies, I know where I stand. If I am being considered then worth going for.

    Any other advice/guidance is greatly received!!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Confused teacher)
    Thanks again for all the kind replies. I know many teach for a few years and then do something else.

    My plan is to send a few applications and see where I stand. If no invites to interview and mainly cold replies, I know where I stand. If I am being considered then worth going for.

    Any other advice/guidance is greatly received!!
    As with applying with any job, don't get disheartened when you don't get an interview. Stick with it. Try going to conferences and networking events; sometimes it helps knowing people.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Just a note, job adverts and applications aren't necessarily the best ways to go about getting a job. Outside of graduate level positions, you're better off contacting employers directly, seeing what recruitment agencies have, and networking. As AmazingArry says, don't be disheartened if you don't get an interview.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    It also helps sometimes to begin at smaller companies and then - with some work experience - apply for non-graduate roles at larger companies.
 
 
 
Poll
Are you going to a festival?
Useful resources

Featured recruiter profiles:

ICAEW logo

Merck

"Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.