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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Emirates, flew on the Airbus A380 which was a real beauty. :love:
    So you claim you're not posh but can afford £3000 flight tickets lol
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    So you claim you're not posh but can afford £3000 flight tickets lol
    Oh my god, not this topic again :rofl: :rofl:
    Anyway, I could be a "rich" roadman, posh =/= rich.
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    it's not even my money tho
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    This is probably my favourite TSR blog :yep: :congrats:
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    (Original post by Freudian Slit)
    This is probably my favourite TSR blog :yep: :congrats:
    Thanks I appreciate it.
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    Brace yourself people, I am about my first ever "serious" post, like ever.
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    On Call
    This post is about being ‘on call’ as a junior doctor in Cardiology.

    Ask any random junior doctor what does being ‘on call’ mean? They will say something like this…You hold a bleep. You hold it for about 12 hours but often more like 14, sometimes over the weekend, sometimes at night, sometimes both. Nurses have a tremendously low threshold to call this bleep at any time they like. You have to answer. You have to do ‘jobs’ for them. You have to see all the ‘crap’ that A&E refer to you. There is no one to help you. You don’t get a chance to eat. It is extremely tiring and no one appreciates you.

    They will say it is not what they signed up for. They will tell you that they got into medicine for the ‘work/life balance’, the generous pension and the admiration from all of humanity.

    Most junior doctors hate being ‘on call’. I don’t. I love it. This is because I see being ‘on call’ very differently.

    I work a tertiary referral center and a ‘Heart Attack Centre’. This means something quite amazing. If any one person out of 1.6 million has a heart attack I am the first doctor they will see. Take a moment to think about how significant that is. I am the person representing my profession in this person’s darkest hour. I am the face of hope, the person to say ‘everything is going to be alright’. To me that is what being ‘on call’ is really about. It is position of great privilege and carries with it a great amount of responsibility. It is about more than just bleeps and nurses.

    I really love my job. I think this makes it easy for me to have the above mindset. I love it because there are so many things I do on a daily basis that are actually saving someone from dying. I don’t claim that another doctor in my place would not have been able to do the same thing (mostly), but it does need a great deal of sophistication to do what we do. By looking at ‘funny squiggles’ on a piece of paper, measuring miniscule electrical currents, we are able to tell the patency of tiny arteries buried deep in your chest and from this, we are able to stop people from having devastating heart attacks.

    Being on call is also when a junior doctor has the most independence. This is something I really enjoy. A good example happened last week. A 55-year-old man was referred to us from A&E with a diagnosis of ‘Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction’ (NSTEMI) – this is a ‘small’ heart attack. A&E has initiated all the management and my job was just to give the patient a ‘once over’ and make sure his medications were prescribed. However, I went to assess the patient, something didn’t quite make sense. He had ECG changes, significantly elevated troponins and chest pain…but why was he breathless? He had some vague respiratory history, but I felt this didn’t explain the clinical picture. He had a clear chest x-ray and a clear chest. He was a little tachycardic, on the verge of being hypotensive – could this be a Pulmonary Embolism (PE)? I thought so. I don’t know why, I just had a feeling. Doing a D-dimer is pointless; it is going to be elevated. I needed a CT Pulmonary Angiogram (CTPA). My consultant had seen the patient and felt that A&E’s diagnosis was right, a small heart attack. I had to argue with my consultant and finally he said “Fine do it if it makes you happy, it will be negative”.

    The scan show bilateral pulmonary emboli. No heart attack, this was a PE. It is the little diagnostic victories like that, which make me really happy and really make me love what I do.

    Also I get paid £35-45 an hour. That helps too.
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Awwww Lawdy

    :toofunny:
    z33
    welcometoib
    MrDystopia
    Queen Cersei.
    Captain Jack
    Reue

    (Original post by iEthan)
    This has been long awaited. I expect weekly updates :yep: :excited:
    (Original post by The Diplomat.)
    im watching this ****
    (Original post by Indeterminate)
    Following

    A pleasant surprise since I'd never have thought of you as the blogging type
    (Original post by ZuluK)
    Look forward to hearing all about you
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    I promise I'm not stalking you :lol:
    (Original post by Quantex)
    Shouldn't you be out saving lives and courting young maidens?
    (Original post by Zacken)
    *nanosecondly
    (Original post by TheGreatImposter)
    When do we get the first entry FAM?
    (Original post by Kholmes1)
    You have to wait 30 secs though.
    (Original post by h3h3)
    In.
    (Original post by acupofgreentea)
    Might as well follow, I suppose.
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    You've literally wrote five words and I bet you this becomes one of the most popular blogs within half an hour. :rofl: The power of TSR infamy.
    (Original post by Carpe Diem Jay)
    Must feel great to have so many TSR fans 😂
    (Original post by TheOtherSide.)
    Subforums will include 'Buying Porsches', 'Medicine at Oxford' and 'Getting the Gold-diggers'.
    (Original post by champ_mc99)
    Awesome Genius


    Cool. Who are you by the way?
    (Original post by tutorscience)
    Attachment 511255
    (Original post by Ethereal World)
    Can I just say, this entire post and what it demonstrates about you as a person is exactly the reason why I do not wish to take you up on your offer to get to know each other better and why I have been ignoring your relentless PMs.

    Especially the bolded part.
    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Traveled on First Class when going to Dubai, and it's just simply amazing. :love: Better food, better service, better space etc. I felt quite "smug" in my £195.00 Yves Saint Laurent shirt :proud:
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    Should've gone on a pony though.
    (Original post by Student403)
    Rekt
    (Original post by Freudian Slit)
    This is probably my favourite TSR blog :yep: :congrats:
    I made a posting. See above. Thanks.
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    On Call
    This post is about being ‘on call’ as a junior doctor in Cardiology.

    Ask any random junior doctor what does being ‘on call’ mean? They will say something like this…You hold a bleep. You hold it for about 12 hours but often more like 14, sometimes over the weekend, sometimes at night, sometimes both. Nurses have a tremendously low threshold to call this bleep at any time they like. You have to answer. You have to do ‘jobs’ for them. You have to see all the ‘crap’ that A&E refer to you. There is no one to help you. You don’t get a chance to eat. It is extremely tiring and no one appreciates you.

    They will say it is not what they signed up for. They will tell you that they got into medicine for the ‘work/life balance’, the generous pension and the admiration from all of humanity.

    Most junior doctors hate being ‘on call’. I don’t. I love it. This is because I see being ‘on call’ very differently.

    I work a tertiary referral center and a ‘Heart Attack Centre’. This means something quite amazing. If any one person out of 1.6 million has a heart attack I am the first doctor they will see. Take a moment to think about how significant that is. I am the person representing my profession in this person’s darkest hour. I am the face of hope, the person to say ‘everything is going to be alright’. To me that is what being ‘on call’ is really about. It is position of great privilege and carries with it a great amount of responsibility. It is about more than just bleeps and nurses.

    I really love my job. I think this makes it easy for me to have the above mindset. I love it because there are so many things I do on a daily basis that are actually saving someone from dying. I don’t claim that another doctor in my place would not have been able to do the same thing (mostly), but it does need a great deal of sophistication to do what we do. By looking at ‘funny squiggles’ on a piece of paper, measuring miniscule electrical currents, we are able to tell the patency of tiny arteries buried deep in your chest and from this, we are able to stop people from having devastating heart attacks.

    Being on call is also when a junior doctor has the most independence. This is something I really enjoy. A good example happened last week. A 55-year-old man was referred to us from A&E with a diagnosis of ‘Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction’ (NSTEMI) – this is a ‘small’ heart attack. A&E has initiated all the management and my job was just to give the patient a ‘once over’ and make sure his medications were prescribed. However, I went to assess the patient, something didn’t quite make sense. He had ECG changes, significantly elevated troponins and chest pain…but why was he breathless? He had some vague respiratory history, but I felt this didn’t explain the clinical picture. He had a clear chest x-ray and a clear chest. He was a little tachycardic, on the verge of being hypotensive – could this be a Pulmonary Embolism (PE)? I thought so. I don’t know why, I just had a feeling. Doing a D-dimer is pointless; it is going to be elevated. I needed a CT Pulmonary Angiogram (CTPA). My consultant had seen the patient and felt that A&E’s diagnosis was right, a small heart attack. I had to argue with my consultant and finally he said “Fine do it if it makes you happy, it will be negative”.

    The scan show bilateral pulmonary emboli. No heart attack, this was a PE. It is the little diagnostic victories like that, which make me really happy and really make me love what I do.

    Also I get paid £35-45 an hour. That helps too.
    You are amazing- I mean that.

    I'm so glad you've done this serious post and the fact that when you're off TSR for long periods of time you are saving or making a difference to people's lives is incredible.

    Keep up the sincerity because you really are awesome. (Not sure about genius).
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    x
    I would like to refer all people who unnecessarily hate on you to this post.

    This was a really good post and gave a lot of insight into not only what you do, but your perspective on the job and why you like it. It was really interesting. Not as exotic as House, I must say, but one must settle in these post-House times. It'll do. :awesome:

    You're not just a TSR bot after all, it would seem. :ahee:

    Spoiler:
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    Although now you've set a high standard for this blog and expectation for genuinely high quality entries. Updates on what you had for breakfast and the progress of your business class flying will simply no longer do. :noway:
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    (Original post by acupofgreentea)
    I would like to refer all people who unnecessarily hate on you to this post.

    This was a really good post and gave a lot of insight into not only what you do, but your perspective on the job and why you like it. It was really interesting. Not as exotic as House, I must say, but one must settle in these post-House times. It'll do. :awesome:

    You're not just a TSR bot after all, it would seem. :ahee:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Although now you've set a high standard for this blog and expectation for genuinely high quality entries. Updates on what you had for breakfast and the progress of your business class flying will simply no longer do. :noway:
    Thanks lol

    But hold on...how did you know my next entry was going to be

    Awesome Genius at 40,000ft - Business Class breakfast

    :/
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    z33
    welcometoib
    MrDystopia
    Queen Cersei.
    Captain Jack
    Reue





































    I made a posting. See above. Thanks.
    Why'd I get tagged in this fantasy tale?
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    (Original post by Reue)
    Why'd I get tagged in this fantasy tale?
    I was hoping id inspire you to post about that Tray 2 paper jam you fixed that no one in marketing could fix for weeks.
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    I was hoping id inspire you to post about that Tray 2 paper jam you fixed that no one in marketing could fix for weeks.
    End of the tax year soon mate, you can finally post that P60 showing us all the £70k you've made this year :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by awesome genius)
    i was hoping id inspire you to post about that tray 2 paper jam you fixed that no one in marketing could fix for weeks.
    bang. Bang. Shots. Fired.
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    On Call
    This post is about being ‘on call’ as a junior doctor in Cardiology.

    Ask any random junior doctor what does being ‘on call’ mean? They will say something like this…You hold a bleep. You hold it for about 12 hours but often more like 14, sometimes over the weekend, sometimes at night, sometimes both. Nurses have a tremendously low threshold to call this bleep at any time they like. You have to answer. You have to do ‘jobs’ for them. You have to see all the ‘crap’ that A&E refer to you. There is no one to help you. You don’t get a chance to eat. It is extremely tiring and no one appreciates you.

    They will say it is not what they signed up for. They will tell you that they got into medicine for the ‘work/life balance’, the generous pension and the admiration from all of humanity.

    Most junior doctors hate being ‘on call’. I don’t. I love it. This is because I see being ‘on call’ very differently.

    I work a tertiary referral center and a ‘Heart Attack Centre’. This means something quite amazing. If any one person out of 1.6 million has a heart attack I am the first doctor they will see. Take a moment to think about how significant that is. I am the person representing my profession in this person’s darkest hour. I am the face of hope, the person to say ‘everything is going to be alright’. To me that is what being ‘on call’ is really about. It is position of great privilege and carries with it a great amount of responsibility. It is about more than just bleeps and nurses.

    I really love my job. I think this makes it easy for me to have the above mindset. I love it because there are so many things I do on a daily basis that are actually saving someone from dying. I don’t claim that another doctor in my place would not have been able to do the same thing (mostly), but it does need a great deal of sophistication to do what we do. By looking at ‘funny squiggles’ on a piece of paper, measuring miniscule electrical currents, we are able to tell the patency of tiny arteries buried deep in your chest and from this, we are able to stop people from having devastating heart attacks.

    Being on call is also when a junior doctor has the most independence. This is something I really enjoy. A good example happened last week. A 55-year-old man was referred to us from A&E with a diagnosis of ‘Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction’ (NSTEMI) – this is a ‘small’ heart attack. A&E has initiated all the management and my job was just to give the patient a ‘once over’ and make sure his medications were prescribed. However, I went to assess the patient, something didn’t quite make sense. He had ECG changes, significantly elevated troponins and chest pain…but why was he breathless? He had some vague respiratory history, but I felt this didn’t explain the clinical picture. He had a clear chest x-ray and a clear chest. He was a little tachycardic, on the verge of being hypotensive – could this be a Pulmonary Embolism (PE)? I thought so. I don’t know why, I just had a feeling. Doing a D-dimer is pointless; it is going to be elevated. I needed a CT Pulmonary Angiogram (CTPA). My consultant had seen the patient and felt that A&E’s diagnosis was right, a small heart attack. I had to argue with my consultant and finally he said “Fine do it if it makes you happy, it will be negative”.

    The scan show bilateral pulmonary emboli. No heart attack, this was a PE. It is the little diagnostic victories like that, which make me really happy and really make me love what I do.

    Also I get paid £35-45 an hour. That helps too.
    Notwithstanding the fact that I struggled to understand some of the medical terminology in the last paragraph; this, your first blog post was very insightful, both into your own personal mindset and into the medical world of Cardiology.

    Your attitude towards your job is incredible; it's amazing to think you and the people like you are the future of the NHS and here are the moronic politicians trying to undermine awesome people like you for the sake of a political agenda.

    The future of the NHS may not be safe with politicians, but with people like you in it, I see hope for it's future
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Notwithstanding the fact that I struggled to understand some of the medical terminology in the last paragraph; this, your first blog post was very insightful, both into your own personal mindset and into the medical world of Cardiology.

    Your attitude towards your job is incredible; it's amazing to think you and the people like you are the future of the NHS and here are the moronic politicians trying to undermine awesome people like you for the sake of a political agenda.

    The future of the NHS may not be safe with politicians, but with people like you in it, I see hope for it's future
    Thanks that's very kind, I appreciate it!
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    On Call
    This post is about being ‘on call’ as a junior doctor in Cardiology.

    Ask any random junior doctor what does being ‘on call’ mean? They will say something like this…You hold a bleep. You hold it for about 12 hours but often more like 14, sometimes over the weekend, sometimes at night, sometimes both. Nurses have a tremendously low threshold to call this bleep at any time they like. You have to answer. You have to do ‘jobs’ for them. You have to see all the ‘crap’ that A&E refer to you. There is no one to help you. You don’t get a chance to eat. It is extremely tiring and no one appreciates you.

    They will say it is not what they signed up for. They will tell you that they got into medicine for the ‘work/life balance’, the generous pension and the admiration from all of humanity.

    Most junior doctors hate being ‘on call’. I don’t. I love it. This is because I see being ‘on call’ very differently.

    I work a tertiary referral center and a ‘Heart Attack Centre’. This means something quite amazing. If any one person out of 1.6 million has a heart attack I am the first doctor they will see. Take a moment to think about how significant that is. I am the person representing my profession in this person’s darkest hour. I am the face of hope, the person to say ‘everything is going to be alright’. To me that is what being ‘on call’ is really about. It is position of great privilege and carries with it a great amount of responsibility. It is about more than just bleeps and nurses.

    I really love my job. I think this makes it easy for me to have the above mindset. I love it because there are so many things I do on a daily basis that are actually saving someone from dying. I don’t claim that another doctor in my place would not have been able to do the same thing (mostly), but it does need a great deal of sophistication to do what we do. By looking at ‘funny squiggles’ on a piece of paper, measuring miniscule electrical currents, we are able to tell the patency of tiny arteries buried deep in your chest and from this, we are able to stop people from having devastating heart attacks.

    Being on call is also when a junior doctor has the most independence. This is something I really enjoy. A good example happened last week. A 55-year-old man was referred to us from A&E with a diagnosis of ‘Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction’ (NSTEMI) – this is a ‘small’ heart attack. A&E has initiated all the management and my job was just to give the patient a ‘once over’ and make sure his medications were prescribed. However, I went to assess the patient, something didn’t quite make sense. He had ECG changes, significantly elevated troponins and chest pain…but why was he breathless? He had some vague respiratory history, but I felt this didn’t explain the clinical picture. He had a clear chest x-ray and a clear chest. He was a little tachycardic, on the verge of being hypotensive – could this be a Pulmonary Embolism (PE)? I thought so. I don’t know why, I just had a feeling. Doing a D-dimer is pointless; it is going to be elevated. I needed a CT Pulmonary Angiogram (CTPA). My consultant had seen the patient and felt that A&E’s diagnosis was right, a small heart attack. I had to argue with my consultant and finally he said “Fine do it if it makes you happy, it will be negative”.

    The scan show bilateral pulmonary emboli. No heart attack, this was a PE. It is the little diagnostic victories like that, which make me really happy and really make me love what I do.

    Also I get paid £35-45 an hour. That helps too.
    For once you are truly deserving of the title Awesome Genius

    Given that I have family and friends in/joining the medical profession, I understand how under-appreciated you guys can be. I truly admire your positive attitude.

    It's awesome how you guys make sacrifices so others can have their health (albeit with some elevated monetary benefits )
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    x
    Hah ! A real post ! That was really interesting to read :yep: :yep:
    Looking forward to read more
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    Coming from a medical background, I know what it's like, I've seen doctors struggling with 12 hour on call shifts and the frigging bleep. One doctor I worked with was awoken 12 times in one night and it is sooo stressful. It's amazing what you do and all doctors aren't given enough credit considering the work you do. And the mindset you go in, it's amazing. Thinking about the outcome instead of the struggle to get there. Good on you for sticking by your guts. PEs are dangerous and suggesting a CT was great. Hope the patient is okay now.

    But great post. Hope to see more.
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    I was hoping id inspire you to post about that Tray 2 paper jam you fixed that no one in marketing could fix for weeks.
    Amazing post.

    Also them shots :toofunny:
 
 
 
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