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Somewhere between life and death watch

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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    That's good; I'm glad he's okay for the time being. It's just so cool how you saved his life though.

    What and where did you do your pre-medicine work experience? I know it's some time ago now but I'm very curious. Did you do any of those clinical work experience placements abroad?
    Just work in a hospital ward. Nothing fancy! No going abroad to Africa lol
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Just work in a hospital ward. Nothing fancy! No going abroad to Africa lol
    Just HCA work and things? I'm surprised because I thought you were from a rich family and you would have been able to do that sort of thing haha
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Just HCA work and things? I'm surprised because I thought you were from a rich family and you would have been able to do that sort of thing haha
    Yeah but I don't want to lol

    No hca, just shadowing
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Yeah but I don't want to lol

    No hca, just shadowing
    Do you still have your Porsche?
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Do you still have your Porsche?
    I have never had a Porsche

    I have one on order
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    I have never had a Porsche

    I have one on order
    So how long will it be before you get it?
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    So how long will it be before you get it?
    Delivery is for may but there are other issues at the moment

    I may be going abroad
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Delivery is for may but there are other issues at the moment

    I may be going abroad
    To work or for holiday? Where did you go for your last holiday?
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    I think that there are few times when you really are going to make the difference between life and death for a patient. Modern medicine's protocols and guidelines mean that patents just move along pathways and scoring systems and most of the time you are just doing what anyone other doctor in your position would have done or could do easily, and, at almost all really serious times there are always senior people to help you.

    A couple of months I found in myself in a rare situation. It presented me with the scariest moment in my life so far. I was doing four days of night shifts. The night previous to the incident I clerked a 45 year old patient with a large anterior ST elevation MI (a BIG heart attack) - I remember telling his wife and three children that he had had a big blow to his heart but since he had been to the cath lab and we had unblocked his arteries, he was going to be OK. I remember having a discussion about whether he would be going home in one night or two...they looked so relieved, they were telling me how much appreciated what we were doing and how we were all amazing etc and I gave my standard line of "oh we are just doing our jobs; besides I didn't even do anything, thank the consultant..."

    The next night was extremely busy. There were two "primaries" at the same time - that is, two patients that needed emergency artery unblockage. There were no registrars (senior doctors) on the ward. It was just me and the nurses. Even the senior staff nurse was on another ward far away.

    There are a lot of noises on CCU. Noises for all kinds of things - low oxygen sats, fast heart beats, phones going off, people furiously pressing the buzzer at the door... I ignore all of them - all the doctors do. But there is one noise you don't ignore. It sounds like an ambulance siren. It is loud and poignant and on a cardiology unit it only goes off very selectively. Basically when someone's heart stops beating - cardiac arrest - the siren is started to alert doctors to the patient needing resuscitsion.

    You have to act quickly. 5 minutes is probably all you have. 10 minutes and there's serious pulmonary oedema and by 15 minutes there is often irreversible brain damage.

    It was the guy I had seen the night before. He has a rhythm known as ventricular fibrillation, where his heart's rhythm is so uncoordinated that it cannot reliably pump blood out of its chambers. It is a well known and fatal complication of a heart attack. So the patient at this point is technically dead. I am the only doctor on the ward and there is no one to help me. So it's literally up to me to bring this guy back to life. And if I fail - I am going to be the one telling his family the news. After two shocks and about 8 mins we get him back. Thankfully I didn't panic.

    I feel that had I been a little bit of a warmer person and a little more emotional and allowed myself to take stock of the situation and feel what was really at stake after I knew which patient had the cardiac arrest, I'd probably not have had the coordination and focus to successful lead the CPR. There was literally no one else that night that could have helped and this guy would have probably died had I not been there.

    These are the kinds of things doctors have to go through at times in their careers. That's why the job is harder than just fixing printers or number crunching on excel - the stakes are just different.
    Wow :cry2::cry2:
    You sir are a hero.
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    To work or for holiday? Where did you go for your last holiday?
    Forever! To live

    I went to India and Germany and Switzerland
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Read my blogg
    Did you just tag random people or what?
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    I think that there are few times when you really are going to make the difference between life and death for a patient. Modern medicine's protocols and guidelines mean that patents just move along pathways and scoring systems and most of the time you are just doing what anyone other doctor in your position would have done or could do easily, and, at almost all really serious times there are always senior people to help you.

    A couple of months I found in myself in a rare situation. It presented me with the scariest moment in my life so far. I was doing four days of night shifts. The night previous to the incident I clerked a 45 year old patient with a large anterior ST elevation MI (a BIG heart attack) - I remember telling his wife and three children that he had had a big blow to his heart but since he had been to the cath lab and we had unblocked his arteries, he was going to be OK. I remember having a discussion about whether he would be going home in one night or two...they looked so relieved, they were telling me how much appreciated what we were doing and how we were all amazing etc and I gave my standard line of "oh we are just doing our jobs; besides I didn't even do anything, thank the consultant..."

    The next night was extremely busy. There were two "primaries" at the same time - that is, two patients that needed emergency artery unblockage. There were no registrars (senior doctors) on the ward. It was just me and the nurses. Even the senior staff nurse was on another ward far away.

    There are a lot of noises on CCU. Noises for all kinds of things - low oxygen sats, fast heart beats, phones going off, people furiously pressing the buzzer at the door... I ignore all of them - all the doctors do. But there is one noise you don't ignore. It sounds like an ambulance siren. It is loud and poignant and on a cardiology unit it only goes off very selectively. Basically when someone's heart stops beating - cardiac arrest - the siren is started to alert doctors to the patient needing resuscitsion.

    You have to act quickly. 5 minutes is probably all you have. 10 minutes and there's serious pulmonary oedema and by 15 minutes there is often irreversible brain damage.

    It was the guy I had seen the night before. He has a rhythm known as ventricular fibrillation, where his heart's rhythm is so uncoordinated that it cannot reliably pump blood out of its chambers. It is a well known and fatal complication of a heart attack. So the patient at this point is technically dead. I am the only doctor on the ward and there is no one to help me. So it's literally up to me to bring this guy back to life. And if I fail - I am going to be the one telling his family the news. After two shocks and about 8 mins we get him back. Thankfully I didn't panic.

    I feel that had I been a little bit of a warmer person and a little more emotional and allowed myself to take stock of the situation and feel what was really at stake after I knew which patient had the cardiac arrest, I'd probably not have had the coordination and focus to successful lead the CPR. There was literally no one else that night that could have helped and this guy would have probably died had I not been there.

    These are the kinds of things doctors have to go through at times in their careers. That's why the job is harder than just fixing printers or number crunching on excel - the stakes are just different.
    You sir are amazing. Stay awesome.
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Forever! To live

    I went to India and Germany and Switzerland
    You're leaving the UK?
    Awww

    Where are you thinking of relocating?

    Ah cool what did you do whilst you were there?

    Is that you in your profile pic btw?
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    This may seem like a random question but does being a doctor mKe you more cold? Like you get so much used to death and sickness that you no longer have as much sympathy anymore?
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    You're leaving the UK?
    Awww

    Where are you thinking of relocating?

    Ah cool what did you do whilst you were there?

    Is that you in your profile pic btw?
    I want to move to California

    I ... Visited the Taj Mahal , ate a lot of ice cream , I made sure my cows were OK , went on a religious pilgrimage , I went to watch cricket


    Yes it is


    (Original post by Roxy1331)
    This may seem like a random question but does being a doctor mKe you more cold? Like you get so much used to death and sickness that you no longer have as much sympathy anymore?
    I think to some extent it makes you less emotional but only while you're at work
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    I want to move to California

    I ... Visited the Taj Mahal , ate a lot of ice cream , I made sure my cows were OK , went on a religious pilgrimage , I went to watch cricket


    Yes it is




    I think to some extent it makes you less emotional but only while you're at work
    You're a hindu, right? What did your religious pilgrimage involve?

    Wow; I'm surprised you have trouble getting dates; even amongst white women
 
 
 
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