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    So, I'll be applying to uni next year and i still haven't decided on a degree to do. I don't really have a passion for anything but i do enjoy technology and my computing class is fairly enjoyable.

    I'm looking to do a computer science degree but i am unsure if it's for me. I think logically and Im able to program easily and i can pick up theory quickly too in my computing class. One problem is maths. I got an A at GCSE but i failed AS maths last year and havent done any maths in a while other than a small amount of binary in my computing Alevel. I haven't struggled with the maths in computing though. I'm just wondering how much maths a CS degree will be as i expect algorithms and similar modules will be very maths based.

    So, to summarise, how much maths is a CS degree? How hard is a CS degree and how much harder is it than A level computing?

    Thanks in advance for any answers.
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    elementary algorithm analysis involves some probability, logarithms and sequences. most mathematics in computer science involves discrete maths, not continuous maths. discrete maths involve logic, functions, sets, relations, graph theory, abstract algebra, graphs etc. continuous maths: algebra, calculus, differential equations, sequences etc.

    if you study CS at a decent russell group university you could join an investment bank as a quant dev. loads of bucks there bro
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    Quite a lot of maths. I'm sure all the top Uni's require it(Maths A Level) too.
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    (Original post by Adeel Ali)
    Quite a lot of maths. I'm sure all the top Uni's require it(Maths A Level) too.
    yes but the maths in CS is very different to the maths in engineering and physics which OP is not comfortable with.
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    (Original post by Raees_Sharif)
    yes but the maths in CS is very different to the maths in engineering and physics which OP is not comfortable with.
    You got Gadaffi in your dp. Are you Libyan too or?

    There's only like 2 libyans on here including myself.
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    (Original post by Raees_Sharif)
    elementary algorithm analysis involves some probability, logarithms and sequences. most mathematics in computer science involves discrete maths, not continuous maths. discrete maths involve logic, functions, sets, relations, graph theory, abstract algebra, graphs etc. continuous maths: algebra, calculus, differential equations, sequences etc.

    if you study CS at a decent russell group university you could join an investment bank as a quant dev. loads of bucks there bro
    Thanks for the response.
    Any chance you could give some more detailed examples of the maths in CS?
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    (Original post by Raees_Sharif)
    calculus, differential equations
    I was under the assumption that you don't do much of this? Or any at all
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    (Original post by gaparkuk)
    Thanks for the response.
    Any chance you could give some more detailed examples of the maths in CS?
    Giving an example of the sort of stuff I've been doing in my first year, we covered just what were described as the 'maths foundations' for our course - discrete maths in the first term - set theory, boolean algebra/logical propositions, single set relations, relational closures. We also looked at and have continued to look at growth rates for complexity theory, so what grows quicker, an algorithm with n complexity on the number of inputs, or log n complexity etc.

    This term we've moved on to using this maths with relation to languages and grammars (Finite State Automata/NDPAs currently) essentially using the set theory we learnt last term. We also started a new module using more 'normal' maths, including calculus looking at solving simultaneous linear equations amongst other things in an algorithmic way. Essentially looking at algorithmic ways we can solve these for large numbers of variables.
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    (Original post by edothero)
    I was under the assumption that you don't do much of this? Or any at all
    It comes up if you want to do any sort of computational modelling (i.e. physics engines etc).

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