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    (Original post by PQ)
    A lot of engineering/physics foundation courses are targeted at students who have the wrong subject background rather than poor performance in the right subjects.

    It's not a back door to get onto a competitive course without the right grades.
    Well I know quite a few people on my degree who got into physics through a foundation course, after not having done too great in their a levels. They are doing fine now. That's why I suggested it.
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    (Original post by Nadile)
    Well I know quite a few people on my degree who got into physics through a foundation course, after not having done too great in their a levels. They are doing fine now. That's why I suggested it.
    There are some foundation years that are designed for people who haven't done so well - but there's just as many where poor grades in maths/physics wont get you onto the course because they're designed to *introduce* people to the A level content they need for their degree and not to *reteach* it.

    As the poster below says - foundation years can be a very poor student experience. I've known universities offer foundation years that are taught at the local sixth form college, where the students can't stay in halls, where 50% or more don't pass the year, where students were sold the course as guaranteed progression to their preferred subject only to find out they can't get onto the more competitive course they had their heart set on etc etc

    It's not a *bad* choice but it's not a great first choice for someone who isn't doing well in their subjects....especially not without a lot of research.
    (Original post by etjayne)
    A lot of people treat it that way hoping for a resurrection from bad A level grades.

    And a lot of universities like it as a way of getting at least a years fees out of students by basically reteaching them A level material. There is, sadly, a cynical side to the foundation year.

    My son did one for engineering and the course was full of people who did poorly in A levels and BTEC people clearly not ready because of lacking mathematics. It was a year of doing A level material.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    There are some foundation years that are designed for people who haven't done so well - but there's just as many where poor grades in maths/physics wont get you onto the course because they're designed to *introduce* people to the A level content they need for their degree and not to *reteach* it.

    As the poster below says - foundation years can be a very poor student experience. I've known universities offer foundation years that are taught at the local sixth form college, where the students can't stay in halls, where 50% or more don't pass the year, where students were sold the course as guaranteed progression to their preferred subject only to find out they can't get onto the more competitive course they had their heart set on etc etc

    It's not a *bad* choice but it's not a great first choice for someone who isn't doing well in their subjects....especially not without a lot of research.
    As much as I don't like the way the universities use the foundation year as a money grubbing exercise, a fault also lies with a lot of the students as well.

    My son's friends commonest reason for doing an engineering foundation year was - "I did crap at A level but I can't think what to do now so I'll have a year living in a city so I can party until I figure out what I want to do in life".

    Some genuinely wanted to make up for poor A levels and do engineering but many didn't care. Now I will say the university in question (a traditional university not a newcomer) did provide a proper learning environment with proper courses and if you passed you did get onto a first year of a proper engineering degree.

    If I recall the pass rate was about 75% at this university for this foundation year. I would say the pass rate of my son's goofball friends was about 20%.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Have you thought about architecture?

    The requirements for maths/physics is a lot lower than engineering and you'd be able to bring in your artistic experience from photography.

    It's a long course but it seems to match your interests without a C in maths A level being a deal breaker.
    Thank you for your straightforward help, I'll take architecture into account.
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    (Original post by etjayne)
    As much as I don't like the way the universities use the foundation year as a money grubbing exercise, a fault also lies with a lot of the students as well.

    My son's friends commonest reason for doing an engineering foundation year was - "I did crap at A level but I can't think what to do now so I'll have a year living in a city so I can party until I figure out what I want to do in life".

    Some genuinely wanted to make up for poor A levels and do engineering but many didn't care. Now I will say the university in question (a traditional university not a newcomer) did provide a proper learning environment with proper courses and if you passed you did get onto a first year of a proper engineering degree.

    If I recall the pass rate was about 75% at this university for this foundation year. I would say the pass rate of my son's goofball friends was about 20%.
    :yes:

    It's very much buyer beware...they can be great for the right students with the right attitudes (who do their research and choose the right foundation year for them).

    We see a lot of threads on TSR from students who pick a foundation year out of panic or desperation to just "get to uni" and regret the decision
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    (Original post by prettyinpunk27)
    After getting my progress review, it looks like I'm not going to pass maths very well (high D, low C) but I intend to pass physics (high B, Low A). I also take english literature and photography. Is there any physics uni courses in engineering, mechanic or astrophysics which do not require A-level maths or at least fit my targets?
    Generally, the lowest grades you need to study Physics at uni is a B in Maths and
    B in Physics but if you can't attain those then a foundation year is often the best route.

    Don't quit just because how long a goal is you should chase after it because you can't see yourself doing anything else in life.

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    (Original post by Username002)
    Nope, but you can get into mechanical engineering courses with a C in A-level maths, and that is VERY VERY generous.
    Where/what university is that?
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    (Original post by PQ)
    :yes:

    It's very much buyer beware...they can be great for the right students with the right attitudes (who do their research and choose the right foundation year for them).

    We see a lot of threads on TSR from students who pick a foundation year out of panic or desperation to just "get to uni" and regret the decision
    My son is now in his third year total (2nd year degree proper) and has completely changed things around. He wasn't even allowed to do A levels (dreadful GCSE's) and went the BTEC route. Now I am no fan of BTEC's (I thought they were embarrassingly low level) but it did get him in the foundation year door - they would not allow him on the degree with BTEC's right away anyway. Now he is on pace to get a 1st on an M.Eng degree in Electrical Engineering.
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    (Original post by Username002)
    More friendly people, yay!
    Do you want me to sugarcoat it or tell you the truth?

    You need to be very good at maths to do physics.

    I am doing physics at Sussex so I know what I am talking about
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    (Original post by Dancatpro)
    Do you want me to sugarcoat it or tell you the truth?

    You need to be very good at maths to do physics.

    I am doing physics at Sussex so I know what I am talking about
    On this website sugarcoating and New Age bull**** seem more in vogue.
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    (Original post by prettyinpunk27)
    After getting my progress review, it looks like I'm not going to pass maths very well (high D, low C) but I intend to pass physics (high B, Low A). I also take english literature and photography. Is there any physics uni courses in engineering, mechanic or astrophysics which do not require A-level maths or at least fit my targets?
    Physics with a foundation year. That's what I'm doing because I got bad AS grades due to panicking in 3 exams
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    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    Where/what university is that?
    UEL- it's basically a free entry.
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    (Original post by Username002)
    UEL- it's basically a free entry.
    I've never even heard of that. The graduate prospects must be really good then...
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    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    I've never even heard of that. The graduate prospects must be really good then...
    At least you can get in with no effort...
 
 
 
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