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    (Original post by PlayerBB)
    Yeah I suck at guessing as well , maybe because of the giant lattice structure, it has a melting point around 1500 Celsius

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    I know how you feel See LOL!! I would of never guessed that figure, I was no where near it!! I'm not surprised though seeing as Diamond has all 4 of it's carbon covalently bonded to eachother leaving no free delocalised electrons/carbon atoms
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    (Original post by FemaleBo55)
    I know how you feel See LOL!! I would of never guessed that figure, I was no where near it!! I'm not surprised though seeing as Diamond has all 4 of it's carbon covalently bonded to eachother leaving no free delocalised electrons/carbon atoms
    LOL yeah exactly, maybe it has a higher one and we're both no where near it haha

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    Finally! I can now get instant help from the chemistry Squad haha.
    Thank you for making this!
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    (Original post by PlayerBB)
    Lol you said it's nearest is 100

    What I meant was, give your answer to nearest hundred, sorry for the confusion


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    (Original post by PlayerBB)
    Yeah I suck at guessing as well , maybe because of the giant lattice structure, it has a melting point around 1500 Celsius

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    nope keep guessing
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    (Original post by FemaleBo55)
    I know how you feel See LOL!! I would of never guessed that figure, I was no where near it!! I'm not surprised though seeing as Diamond has all 4 of it's carbon covalently bonded to eachother leaving no free delocalised electrons/carbon atoms

    Nope keep guessing...
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    (Original post by Science_help)
    nope keep guessing
    Oh! that's okay and hmm okay 2500 C ?
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    (Original post by PlayerBB)
    Oh! that's okay and hmm okay 2500 C ?
    nope, but ill give you a clue.

    Have you every seen/heard of liquid diamond ?
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    (Original post by Science_help)
    nope, but ill give you a clue.

    Have you every seen/heard of liquid diamond ?
    No just heard of it but not actually seen it

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    I really need help with titration curves. I always mess up the end point and the vertical (it's always too long). I understand the principles/ For example I made the vertical from ph 5 to 11 with ethanoic acid and NaOH but the mark scheme said it had to be from ph 5.5 to 12 or something like that.
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    I just got my official exam timetable for the summer and it seems that I'm entered for AS Chemistry for AQA and edexcel at the same time and date. Is that even allowed or do you guys think it's just a mistake? We have been doing the edexcel specification.
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    (Original post by Ladymusiclover)
    I really need help with titration curves. I always mess up the end point and the vertical (it's always too long). I understand the principles/ For example I made the vertical from ph 5 to 11 with ethanoic acid and NaOH but the mark scheme said it had to be from ph 5.5 to 12 or something like that.
    That's quite cruel to be honest. I mean you understand the concept and you were pretty much spot on.

    The pH values are just one of those things you need to learn. For instance, NaOH is a strong base and so will have a pH of 13-14.


    pH values vary across exam boards. You might also be expected to recall pH values for specific compounds.
    But you can try remember these steps.
    1. What is being titrated? i.e. what's in the beaker. That's the starting pH. If it's a strong acid you're going to have a low pH of 1-3. If it's a weak acid, it'll be 3-6. If it's a strong base, it'll be 12-14. If it's a weak base, it'll be 8-11.
    2. What is it being titrated against? i.e. what's in the burette. That's the thing that will change the pH. If it's a strong acid, the end will be 1-3. If it's a weak acid it'll be 3-6, and so on.
    3. Draw the vertical portion at the equivalent point and about 1.5-2 pH off the end values. What I mean by this is say your end pH is 13 (e.g. your titrant is NaOH). Draw the vertical portion up to 11 or 11.5, maybe 12.
    4. Combine the vertical portion with the two pH values by nice curves.
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    (Original post by victoriawo19)
    I just got my official exam timetable for the summer and it seems that I'm entered for AS Chemistry for AQA and edexcel at the same time and date. Is that even allowed or do you guys think it's just a mistake? We have been doing the edexcel specification.
    You are not being taught the AQA syllabus for Chemistry then it is highly unlikely that you would need to do an exam on it. I think you should go to your examination officer/admin and talk about it to them see if they can withdraw you from the exam, or if it is a mistake they should give you a new timetable with the correct exam dates. What ever exam board you're doing you'll be given an exam paper based on it. It's one examboard per subject taught

    Lol hope that helps
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    (Original post by Science_help)
    nope, but ill give you a clue.

    Have you every seen/heard of liquid diamond ?
    (Original post by PlayerBB)
    LOL yeah exactly, maybe it has a higher one and we're both no where near it haha

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    Oh my lol if it's not 1500, is it around 3000-5000??? I can't imagine it to be any higher LOL -.-
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    (Original post by FemaleBo55)
    Oh my lol if it's not 1500, is it around 3000-5000??? I can't imagine it to be any higher LOL -.-
    You are close, yet really wrong.


    PlayerBB FemaleBo55


    the question was what temperature does diamond melt it....

    answer is :
    Spoiler:
    Show
    it does not melt.
    Diamond does not melt, it sublimes, which means it turns from solid to gas, but doesn't melt, I founit quite interesting first time I found out aha.

    Also temp at which it sublimes is around 4600
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    Are you guys in year 12 or 13? I'm in year 12
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    (Original post by Science_help)
    You are close, yet really wrong.


    PlayerBB FemaleBo55


    the question was what temperature does diamond melt it....

    answer is :
    Spoiler:
    Show
    it does not melt.
    Diamond does not melt, it sublimes, which means it turns from solid to gas, but doesn't melt, I founit quite interesting first time I found out aha.

    Also temp at which it sublimes is around 4600
    OMG! I feel really stupid not knowing that, but it was a really good question, yet a tricky one!

    I am sure, it was hilarious for you seeing me and FemaleBo55 trying to guess while on the other hand, it doesn't even melt haha :bricks:
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    (Original post by Jade Li)
    Are you guys in year 12 or 13? I'm in year 12
    I'm in year 13
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    (Original post by Science_help)
    You are close, yet really wrong.


    PlayerBB FemaleBo55


    the question was what temperature does diamond melt it....

    answer is :
    Spoiler:
    Show
    it does not melt.
    Diamond does not melt, it sublimes, which means it turns from solid to gas, but doesn't melt, I founit quite interesting first time I found out aha.

    Also temp at which it sublimes is around 4600
    this isn't technically true. If you are talking about the kind of pressures we experience on earth than yes it will sublime, but at extremely high pressures it is possible to get liquid diamond, and there are a few predictions that liquid diamond may exist on other planets in our solar system. Also, although an interesting question this thread is probably better used for questions to which people can work out the answer to, rather than trivia or random guesses.
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    (Original post by Science_help)
    You are close, yet really wrong.


    PlayerBB FemaleBo55


    the question was what temperature does diamond melt it....

    answer is :
    Spoiler:
    Show
    it does not melt.
    Diamond does not melt, it sublimes, which means it turns from solid to gas, but doesn't melt, I founit quite interesting first time I found out aha.

    Also temp at which it sublimes is around 4600
    Really?!!! Ohhhh woow lol, where'd you find that out? That's quite interesting 🤔 I wouldn't of guessed it sublimes I always though majority of the things have melting points in which some have really high ones and some have low ones 🙊

    (Original post by Jade Li)
    Are you guys in year 12 or 13? I'm in year 12
    Well personally I'm in Year 13 👌🏽
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    I have a question from OCR May 2013 paper that I can't do. Any help is appreciated please.

    iii) The F-B-F bond angle in BF3 is different from the F-B-F bond angle in H3NBF3. Complete the table to predict the F-B-F bond angle in BF3 and in H3NBF3.

    I got 120 for BF3 which is right but I can't work out the H3NBF3 bond angle. The m.s. says is 109.5.

    iv) The H-N-H bond angle in NH3 is 107. A student predicted that the bond angle in H3NBF3 is larger. Explain why the student might expect the H-N-H bond angle to be larger in H3NBF3 than in NH3.

    I know that the lone pair in NH3 repels more than the bonded pair of electrons. Also N in NH3 has 3 bonding pairs and 1 pair of electrons.
    But I don't understand why the m.s. said N in H3NBF3 has 4 bonding pairs and no lone pairs.
 
 
 
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