Petition for Allowing GCSE English candidates to have blank texts during their exams.

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zealable
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You might already know, but current Year 9 & 10 are having to memorize their texts instead of having it in front of them as a blank text during the exams. My friends told me about this petition online on https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/121692 and hopefully it will get to 10,000 signatures. Honestly, I don't really know if they would change it because they haven't even had one year group do the new GCSE yet, but we can try. Just wanted to raise some awareness on this issue and say that there is a petition so we can do something about this, even if 10,000 of us have to do it to get heard.
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cookiemonster15
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I had to memorise all my texts when I took my GCSE's, I even had a booklet full of quotes and stuff.

In a way, it was better because it meant I wasn't wasting time constantly looking through the text...
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Airmed
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In Northern Ireland, CCEA has been doing closed book GCSE and A Level English Literature for years. It's becoming the norm now, to make the exams harder, and I don't think a petition can stop it - because as you've said, it's not even been trialed yet.
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soIiIoquy
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i dont see why your so worried, i have "unseen poetry" meaning that ANY POEM could come up you just gotta b ready for it
in fact i feel yours is easier bc you can thoroughly study each poem in ur anthology and you'll have that feeling of knowing what may come in the exam however ours is unexpected and we have to be prepared
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cookiemonster15
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(Original post by mariam687)
i dont see why your so worried, i have "unseen poetry" meaning that ANY POEM could come up you just gotta b ready for it
in fact i feel yours is easier bc you can thoroughly study each poem in ur anthology and you'll have that feeling of knowing what may come in the exam however ours is unexpected and we have to be prepared
I remember doing unseen poetry! Was it weird that it was my favourite part of the exam?
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soIiIoquy
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(Original post by cookiemonster15)
I remember doing unseen poetry! Was it weird that it was my favourite part of the exam?
ugh r u fr? i h8 unseen i prefer analyzing the novels bc ik whats gna come up
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GetOverHere
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(Original post by mariam687)
i dont see why your so worried, i have "unseen poetry" meaning that ANY POEM could come up you just gotta b ready for it
in fact i feel yours is easier bc you can thoroughly study each poem in ur anthology and you'll have that feeling of knowing what may come in the exam however ours is unexpected and we have to be prepared
At least you know that it'll be one poem from your anthology, whether you're familiar with it or not.Try dealing with four different texts, from any period of time, that you're almost guaranteed to have never have seen before. For one question, two of the texts are of the same genre of prose or drama or poetry, and for the other it is one of each of the other two genres not tested in question 1. Question 1 asks you to compare the poems, Question 2 asks you to compare an aspect (we were asked about proposals in our mock exams). You have to bring in wider reading from anything that you've read, and relate something you know to something you don't, even if it's the most vague thing.

AQA English Literature A2, everybody! *claps*
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TheOtherSide.
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(Original post by Airmed)
In Northern Ireland, CCEA has been doing closed book GCSE and A Level English Literature for years. It's becoming the norm now, to make the exams harder, and I don't think a petition can stop it - because as you've said, it's not even been trialed yet.
It's not even just in Northern Ireland - our school does the WJEC exam board, which does closed book examinations (my school's in England, by the way).

Having an open book examination might be nicer, but I really do think that the boards should firstly trial it, like you said, for at least a year to firstly see if this is a viable method of examining Literature.
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cookiemonster15
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(Original post by mariam687)
ugh r u fr? i h8 unseen i prefer analyzing the novels bc ik whats gna come up
I dunno, I just liked being able to come up with comparisons and differences between two new texts...

Once you get the structure of what to write, it's easy to apply it to any two poems

(Also, it got really boring analysing the same texts again and again)
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soIiIoquy
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(Original post by TheOtherSide.)
It's not even just in Northern Ireland - our school does the WJEC exam board, which does closed book examinations (my school's in England, by the way).

Having an open book examination might be nicer, but I really do think that the boards should firstly trial it, like you said, for at least a year to firstly see if this is a viable method of examining Literature.
i agree!
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soIiIoquy
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(Original post by GetOverHere)
At least you know that it'll be one poem from your anthology, whether you're familiar with it or not.Try dealing with four different texts, from any period of time, that you're almost guaranteed to have never have seen before. For one question, two of the texts are of the same genre of prose or drama or poetry, and for the other it is one of each of the other two genres not tested in question 1. Question 1 asks you to compare the poems, Question 2 asks you to compare an aspect (we were asked about proposals in our mock exams). You have to bring in wider reading from anything that you've read, and relate something you know to something you don't, even if it's the most vague thing.

AQA English Literature A2, everybody! *claps*
were u supposed to quote me?
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GetOverHere
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(Original post by mariam687)
were u supposed to quote me?
You're correct, sorry :c
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Airmed
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(Original post by TheOtherSide.)
It's not even just in Northern Ireland - our school does the WJEC exam board, which does closed book examinations (my school's in England, by the way).

Having an open book examination might be nicer, but I really do think that the boards should firstly trial it, like you said, for at least a year to firstly see if this is a viable method of examining Literature.
Everyone is just kicking up a fuss because AQA have introduced it (I did AQA for GCSE but CCEA for A Level - preferred CCEA).
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soIiIoquy
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(Original post by GetOverHere)
You're correct, sorry :c
ahaha its ok good advice though
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TheOtherSide.
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(Original post by Airmed)
Everyone is just kicking up a fuss because AQA have introduced it (I did AQA for GCSE but CCEA for A Level - preferred CCEA).
So that's what happened. Well, they can't really complain about something they haven't tried yet.
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User1333171
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In other subjects you have to memorise facts and formulas, so I think it's fair that in English you have to study the texts in depth to the extent that you can quote from them and know what goes on throughout the whole book. If you have the text it becomes a case of just having to pick things out in the exam, whereas the exam is testing what you've managed to learn over a period of time studying the book.
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Airmed
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(Original post by TheOtherSide.)
So that's what happened. Well, they can't really complain about something they haven't tried yet.
Exactly. People need to wait until the results are in and compared to last year's to see if closed book has had any impact.
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crashMATHS
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(Original post by zealable)
You might already know, but current Year 9 & 10 are having to memorize their texts instead of having it in front of them as a blank text during the exams. My friends told me about this petition online on https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/121692 and hopefully it will get to 10,000 signatures. Honestly, I don't really know if they would change it because they haven't even had one year group do the new GCSE yet, but we can try. Just wanted to raise some awareness on this issue and say that there is a petition so we can do something about this, even if 10,000 of us have to do it to get heard.
But why? There is no point. It is an approved specification and closed book exams have been happening on many specifications - they are not going to change their specification because students are not happy with the change.

Closed book exams may seem quite daunting and quite terrifying at first, but, really, they are much more fruitful: you do not have to spend all the exam searching the book for a quote and you can just focus on writing the essay. Plus it does not really have to be about memorising a bank of quotes, but, if you engage with the text or have worked on it, you are likely to remember them anyways; it's like song lyrics, you listen to a song for awhile and you don't have to think before you reiterate the lyrics. Same situation here. If you actually revise for the subject, the quotes that are important and ones you engage with most you should remember.

It also complements the increased rigour of the reformed GCSEs.
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username1751857
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They said no lol - game over for us.
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Chaitra26
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(Original post by crashMATHS)
But why? There is no point. It is an approved specification and closed book exams have been happening on many specifications - they are not going to change their specification because students are not happy with the change.

Closed book exams may seem quite daunting and quite terrifying at first, but, really, they are much more fruitful: you do not have to spend all the exam searching the book for a quote and you can just focus on writing the essay. Plus it does not really have to be about memorising a bank of quotes, but, if you engage with the text or have worked on it, you are likely to remember them anyways; it's like song lyrics, you listen to a song for awhile and you don't have to think before you reiterate the lyrics. Same situation here. If you actually revise for the subject, the quotes that are important and ones you engage with most you should remember.

It also complements the increased rigour of the reformed GCSEs.
1) there's no harm in trying
2) memorising quotes does not mean that you have an understanding.

Say i have a brilliant understanding of the book, but in the exam i happen to forget 1 quote, does that make my understanding bad? I don't think so.

Providing clean books will not change how much you understand the text. I think you should take these exams for yourself and see what you get.
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