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    (Original post by BlackPen)
    I've gotten all 5 so I will have to decide between UCL and LSE. LSE has lower requirements though...
    I have offer from UCL too for Maths & Statistical Science for A*A*A. What course did u apply at UCL? Which one do u prefer between LSE & UCL?
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    (Original post by BlackPen)
    Just received an offer!
    Nice one! Are you waiting on any others or are you gonna firm lse?
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    (Original post by Jj15)
    I have offer from UCL too for Maths & Statistical Science for A*A*A. What course did u apply at UCL? Which one do u prefer between LSE & UCL?
    Statistics, Economics, and a Language (most probably Chinese) for AAA (Maths Physics Furthermaths. I will look at the courses after my trials in April before deciding.
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    (Original post by Tizzydag)
    Nice one! Are you waiting on any others or are you gonna firm lse?
    I might! Though I'm still considering UCL's offer.
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    Any international applicants?
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    Hey I'm a student from Malaysia. Just received an offer for Actuarial Science yesterday.
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    Just received an offer on Thursday
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    (Original post by SyazwanShahrul)
    Hey I'm a student from Malaysia. Just received an offer for Actuarial Science yesterday.
    Good stuff!! Are you going to firm it?
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    Hey got my offer for Actuarial Science last week. What halls is everyone applying for? I've submitted my application but haven't heard anything back yet, hopefully get a place at Passfield. Is anyone considering taking an offer from somewhere else for Actuarial Science?
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    (Original post by Connor16)
    Hey got my offer for Actuarial Science last week. What halls is everyone applying for? I've submitted my application but haven't heard anything back yet, hopefully get a place at Passfield. Is anyone considering taking an offer from somewhere else for Actuarial Science?
    Congrats on your offer! Still waiting for my last choice to get back before I could firm. If I do firm LSE, I will probably go for bankside or Holborn as I need a 38-week rent.
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    (Original post by Connor16)
    Hey got my offer for Actuarial Science last week. What halls is everyone applying for? I've submitted my application but haven't heard anything back yet, hopefully get a place at Passfield. Is anyone considering taking an offer from somewhere else for Actuarial Science?
    Congrats! I've just submitted my application today. Applied for High Holborn, Northumberland, and College Hall. I need that 38weeks contract as well
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    Hi everyone, got an offer back in December, and applied to halls a few weeks ago, anyone heard anything from Passfield?
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    Hey I got an offer too and I'm from Malaysia)
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    Does anyone know any details of how the majority of the modules in course are examined/assessed? ie. will there be a lot of essay writing or will it be mainly calculation work or projects?
    Looking at the course list the main components seem to be maths/stats based, but it doesn't look as though there is a lot of detailed financial knowledge covered. Will these courses go in to more detail than is shown in the description or is the finance side of things included partly in all the other courses as how to apply the stats/maths knowledge?
    I haven't seen anything in any of the courses around Investment Analysis, Fund Management, Financial Econometrics or Financial Engineering - will any of this be covered? as I know there are other act sci courses that do cover it
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    (Original post by Connor16)
    Does anyone know any details of how the majority of the modules in course are examined/assessed? ie. will there be a lot of essay writing or will it be mainly calculation work or projects?
    Looking at the course list the main components seem to be maths/stats based, but it doesn't look as though there is a lot of detailed financial knowledge covered. Will these courses go in to more detail than is shown in the description or is the finance side of things included partly in all the other courses as how to apply the stats/maths knowledge?
    I haven't seen anything in any of the courses around Investment Analysis, Fund Management, Financial Econometrics or Financial Engineering - will any of this be covered? as I know there are other act sci courses that do cover it
    I believe all modules consist of examinations (some also have a coursework assessment, but in years 2/3). Barely any essay writing amongst the maths/stats modules. LSE100, EC102 will be essay question-types. Years 1 and 2 mainly consist of teaching you the building blocks and concepts (MA100,MA212,ST102,ST202). Modules with stereotypical 'financial' applications include ST226, ST330 (theoretical/very detailed quantitative finance) and FM212 ('principles of finance' probably what you are looking for) (all FMxxx are 'financial mathematics courses). FM212 can be taken as one of your options in year 2. Also you can substitute AC104 for MA103 in the first year. What you have listed at the bottom is more or less covered in both FM212 and ST330 (bulk in ST330). Although there will not be much if any econometrics in this degree. Check the individual pages for each module to see what it consists of.
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    (Original post by DarkPeople)
    I believe all modules consist of examinations (some also have a coursework assessment, but in years 2/3). Barely any essay writing amongst the maths/stats modules. LSE100, EC102 will be essay question-types. Years 1 and 2 mainly consist of teaching you the building blocks and concepts (MA100,MA212,ST102,ST202). Modules with stereotypical 'financial' applications include ST226, ST330 (theoretical/very detailed quantitative finance) and FM212 ('principles of finance' probably what you are looking for) (all FMxxx are 'financial mathematics courses). FM212 can be taken as one of your options in year 2. Also you can substitute AC104 for MA103 in the first year. What you have listed at the bottom is more or less covered in both FM212 and ST330 (bulk in ST330). Although there will not be much if any econometrics in this degree. Check the individual pages for each module to see what it consists of.
    Your insightful details have help me to understand the course modules better 👍🏻😄.

    However, would you be able to elaborate further on the teaching part and the level of difficulty as I find the low student satisfaction on teaching by LSE a bit worrying. Thanks so much.
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    (Original post by DarkPeople)
    I believe all modules consist of examinations (some also have a coursework assessment, but in years 2/3). Barely any essay writing amongst the maths/stats modules. LSE100, EC102 will be essay question-types. Years 1 and 2 mainly consist of teaching you the building blocks and concepts (MA100,MA212,ST102,ST202). Modules with stereotypical 'financial' applications include ST226, ST330 (theoretical/very detailed quantitative finance) and FM212 ('principles of finance' probably what you are looking for) (all FMxxx are 'financial mathematics courses). FM212 can be taken as one of your options in year 2. Also you can substitute AC104 for MA103 in the first year. What you have listed at the bottom is more or less covered in both FM212 and ST330 (bulk in ST330). Although there will not be much if any econometrics in this degree. Check the individual pages for each module to see what it consists of.
    Thanks a lot for the reply, I'm currently struggling to decide between two different actuarial courses and it's helping me understand what I'm going to be studying/be expected to do when i start. All of the stats sounds good and the finance modules look interesting
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    (Original post by Jj15)
    Your insightful details have help me to understand the course modules better 👍🏻😄.

    However, would you be able to elaborate further on the teaching part and the level of difficulty as I find the low student satisfaction on teaching by LSE a bit worrying. Thanks so much.
    No problem! As is the LSE, workload at any top university will be pretty high. Firstly in term of difficulty, I would say that as long as you try and keep up with the lecture notes and problem sets (even if you don't hand them in), it shouldn't be too bad. You'll quickly find out what type of modules you prefer. I personally didn't like abstract courses i.e. all of MA103 and some topics in other modules. I found them more difficult than application-based modules. LSE is difficult, which is why employers seem to be keen in recruiting graduates here (can handle the workload/pressure etc.)

    Teaching is a bit hit and miss. Some are good, some not so good. It's a very multicultural department with many lecturers from different parts of the world (i.e. France, Italy, China etc.) who all are experts within their field. You get your standard 2 hours of lectures and 1 hour for classes per module each week. Outside that there are 'office hours' to talk to lecturers about any of the course content you might need help with. Make no mistake though. At least 80% of the work you will have to do will be independent learning. It's all good learning the stuff through lectures and classes, but I've found that I've more or less taught myself most things at home. I read earlier that the LSE have acknowledged some falling standards across the board and that they are investing £11million into improving their teaching in lectures, staff etc.
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    (Original post by DarkPeople)
    No problem! As is the LSE, workload at any top university will be pretty high. Firstly in term of difficulty, I would say that as long as you try and keep up with the lecture notes and problem sets (even if you don't hand them in), it shouldn't be too bad. You'll quickly find out what type of modules you prefer. I personally didn't like abstract courses i.e. all of MA103 and some topics in other modules. I found them more difficult than application-based modules. LSE is difficult, which is why employers seem to be keen in recruiting graduates here (can handle the workload/pressure etc.)

    Teaching is a bit hit and miss. Some are good, some not so good. It's a very multicultural department with many lecturers from different parts of the world (i.e. France, Italy, China etc.) who all are experts within their field. You get your standard 2 hours of lectures and 1 hour for classes per module each week. Outside that there are 'office hours' to talk to lecturers about any of the course content you might need help with. Make no mistake though. At least 80% of the work you will have to do will be independent learning. It's all good learning the stuff through lectures and classes, but I've found that I've more or less taught myself most things at home. I read earlier that the LSE have acknowledged some falling standards across the board and that they are investing £11million into improving their teaching in lectures, staff etc.
    Thank you for your reply. It is imperative that I have a realistic expectation of the teaching level in LSE before embarking on my study this September and your 2 posts have provided me with the information required. Once again thanks a lot for your valuable and informative response.
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    Did anybody go to the offer holders day yesterday? (12th April)
 
 
 
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