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    I get the impression that far-left progressivism is almost the default political position upheld by university students in this day-and-age; often to the point where those on the right of the political spectrum are a fringe minority.

    Is this the case at Cambridge? Obviously, due to nature of academia and student demographics, the student body will always tend to lean to the left a bit... but will someone like myself who considers himself to be right-of-centre still find plenty of people with whom my political beliefs align?

    How common is it to hear students voice positions such as the following (I don't happen to agree with all of these, I'm just giving examples); advocating tighter controls on immigration and lower net migration into the UK, criticisms of Islam, criticisms of feminism, less government intervention and less tax, criticisms of abortion/pro-life arguments, criticisms of gay marriage, criticisms of transgenders, arguments in favor of foreign intervention/colonialism, private, competitive and free-market healthcare/education and opposition to long-term welfare.
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    Don't worry, there are plenty of Tories and even UKIP enthusiasts at Cam. You may also have to learn when to keep your mouth shut, of course, but that is a useful skill one acquires while growing up.
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    (Original post by FrankTeller1234)
    I get the impression that far-left progressivism is almost the default political position upheld by university students in this day-and-age; often to the point where those on the right of the political spectrum are a fringe minority.

    Is this the case at Cambridge? Obviously, due to nature of academia and student demographics, the student body will always tend to lean to the left a bit... but will someone like myself who considers himself to be right-of-centre still find plenty of people with whom my political beliefs align?

    How common is it to hear students voice positions such as the following (I don't happen to agree with all of these, I'm just giving examples); advocating tighter controls on immigration and lower net migration into the UK, criticisms of Islam, criticisms of feminism, less government intervention and less tax, criticisms of abortion/pro-life arguments, criticisms of gay marriage, criticisms of transgenders, arguments in favor of foreign intervention/colonialism, private, competitive and free-market healthcare/education and opposition to long-term welfare.
    Cambridge students were heavy libdem voters in 2011 on the back of the promise of free tuition fees. The constituency then went Labour in 2015.

    I think it is a shame if right wing views are defined in terms of things you criticise and I think one of the benefits of university is to be exposed to people who think differently and come from different backgrounds and perspectives.
    It is worth remembering that a large proportion of the student body come from grammar & independent schools and middle-class backgrounds. Whilst many are more left-wing than their parents it is by no means universal.
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    In my experience, there are plenty of very vocal people on both sides of the spectrum. I don't discriminate though. I find both groups equally obnoxious #egalitarianism

    Joking aside, there are both left-wing and right-wing societies that you can join in Cambridge so I'm sure you'll be able to find people with similar opinions, if that's what you're worried about. Stereotypically, you'll find more 'right-wingers' in the old colleges (*cough* John's) and more left-wing views in places like the CUSU. I'm told that Caius is pretty right-wing too, which I probably should have realised myself, but I don't get involved in politics tbh.
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    In terms of the JCRs, students union etc, yeah, very left-wing views predominate. (Typical SJW-style stuff.)

    I dunno about the average students. I presume left-wing on average, as students tend to be.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    In terms of the JCRs, students union etc, yeah, very left-wing views predominate. (Typical SJW-style stuff.)

    I dunno about the average students. I presume left-wing on average, as students tend to be.
    (Original post by Rhetorical Hips)
    In my experience, there are plenty of very vocal people on both sides of the spectrum. I don't discriminate though. I find both groups equally obnoxious #egalitarianism

    Joking aside, there are both left-wing and right-wing societies that you can join in Cambridge so I'm sure you'll be able to find people with similar opinions, if that's what you're worried about. Stereotypically, you'll find more 'right-wingers' in the old colleges (*cough* John's) and more left-wing views in places like the CUSU. I'm told that Caius is pretty right-wing too, which I probably have realised myself, but I don't get involved in politics tbh.
    How does the whole student union system work at Cambridge? Am I right in thinking they are responsible for the college debates you seen on YouTube? If they are supposed to be a representation of the student body at Cambridge, then why is everything about them so heavily slanted to the Left?

    I've noticed there are individual college unions, too. How do these differ in their purpose and role compared to the CUSU? Do they host their own debates too? And is Trinity still disaffiliated from the CUSU or did it rejoin?
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    (Original post by FrankTeller1234)
    How does the whole student union system work at Cambridge? Am I right in thinking they are responsible for the college debates you seen on YouTube? If they are supposed to be a representation of the student body at Cambridge, then why is everything about them so heavily slanted to the Left?

    I've noticed there are individual college unions, too. How do these differ in their purpose and role compared to the CUSU? Do they host their own debates too? And is Trinity still disaffiliated from the CUSU or did it rejoin?
    What debates? I think you might be getting CUSU (university students union) mixed up with the Cambridge Union Society (a debate society).
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    (Original post by FrankTeller1234)
    I get the impression that far-left progressivism is almost the default political position upheld by university students in this day-and-age; often to the point where those on the right of the political spectrum are a fringe minority.

    Is this the case at Cambridge? Obviously, due to nature of academia and student demographics, the student body will always tend to lean to the left a bit... but will someone like myself who considers himself to be right-of-centre still find plenty of people with whom my political beliefs align?

    How common is it to hear students voice positions such as the following (I don't happen to agree with all of these, I'm just giving examples); advocating tighter controls on immigration and lower net migration into the UK, criticisms of Islam, criticisms of feminism, less government intervention and less tax, criticisms of abortion/pro-life arguments, criticisms of gay marriage, criticisms of transgenders, arguments in favor of foreign intervention/colonialism, private, competitive and free-market healthcare/education and opposition to long-term welfare.
    Students as a whole are majority radically left wing. It is a combination of the education system and the "lack of life experience"
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    What debates? I think you might be getting CUSU (university students union) mixed up with the Cambridge Union Society (a debate society).
    Yes, I am.

    1. Is this debating society politically neutral? Or do you find that there is still a left-wing bias there?

    2. What is the actual purpose of the CUSU, then? What does it do for the average student at Cambridge? Does it impact them in any way?

    3. If a JCR is simply a common room where people socialize, why would it be politicized? Are people who linger around these areas hostile towards those with conservative social/moral opinions?
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    What are your conservative moral opinions?
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    Cambridge is one of the very few constituencies that voted for the AV system in the 2011 referendum, alongside Oxford, Glasgow, Edinburgh and central London. I suspect that the number of communists is particularly high in these areas - where you can find a strong proportion of students.

    Results in East Anglia:

    The green dot is Cambridge.

    However, there is still a minority of right-wingers in these universities.
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    (Original post by FrankTeller1234)
    Yes, I am.

    1. Is this debating society politically neutral? Or do you find that there is still a left-wing bias there?

    2. What is the actual purpose of the CUSU, then? What does it do for the average student at Cambridge? Does it impact them in any way?

    3. If a JCR is simply a common room where people socialize, why would it be politicized? Are people who linger around these areas hostile towards those with conservative social/moral opinions?
    1. I would say that the debating society, CUSU, and JCR committees are probably all constitutionally politically neutral.

    2. I'm not sure myself, but I would say that I'm sure they do good work, eg supporting students in difficulty etc.

    3. The JCR tends to refer to both the room and the committee. As it's student politics, in my view, these committees tend to see left-wing views over-represented. They are democratically elected though, so c'est la vie.
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    I think the majority of students are left-leaning but not particularly politically active. JCR politics is about things like allocating the budget for societies, liaising with College authorities about issues like rent/food prices, organising socials and welfare provision, rather than big political discussions. CUSU does similar stuff on a larger scale, and probably is more politically vocal - there was a series of "no platform" arguments in recent years when controversial speakers were blocked from coming to Cambridge. The Cambridge Union is a breeding ground for wannabe politicians and journalists, with political views across the spectrum - every year they have a debate on "This House has no confidence in Her Majesty's Government," regardless of who is in power.

    There is, of course, a university Conservative Association if you want to get involved in that sort of thing. And it is possible to be friends with people whose political views you don't totally agree with!
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    I think the majority of students are left-leaning but not particularly politically active. JCR politics is about things like allocating the budget for societies, liaising with College authorities about issues like rent/food prices, organising socials and welfare provision, rather than big political discussions. CUSU does similar stuff on a larger scale, and probably is more politically vocal - there was a series of "no platform" arguments in recent years when controversial speakers were blocked from coming to Cambridge. The Cambridge Union is a breeding ground for wannabe politicians and journalists, with political views across the spectrum - every year they have a debate on "This House has no confidence in Her Majesty's Government," regardless of who is in power.

    There is, of course, a university Conservative Association if you want to get involved in that sort of thing. And it is possible to be friends with people whose political views you don't totally agree with!
    I can rub along perfectly well with with those on the Left who genuinely adhere to liberal principles. You will probably be aware, however, that in the last 5-10 years, certain factions of the Left have changed beyond all recognition and lost sight of what they used to stand for. Instead of advocating free speech, liberty and tolerance, they're harping on about privilege, cultural appropriation and oppression. And it's very difficult to get along with someone when they genuinely view people on the right of the political spectrum as legitimately evil. You also constantly feel as if if you are treading on egg-shells whilst speaking to them in an attempt not to say something that will spark a hysterical response from them. For some reason, these people tend to be disproportionately represented at university relative to the general population, too.

    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    x
    Second part of post directed towards Chief Wiggum, Helenia or any other past/present Cambridge student with experience of this:

    As for the Conservative Association, is that a society *strictly* for students who support the Tories, vote for the Tories or have aspirations of one day being a member of the Tories? Or is it a general association for people interested in Conservatism as a political philosophy? If the former, are there any other societies at Cambridge for those who don't necessarily have unconditional support for the Tories but who are interested in meeting people with similar right-wing political-leanings?
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    (Original post by FrankTeller1234)
    As for the Conservative Association, is that a society *strictly* for students who support the Tories, vote for the Tories or have aspirations of one day being a member of the Tories? Or is it a general association for people interested in Conservatism as a political philosophy? If the former, are there any other societies at Cambridge for those who don't necessarily have unconditional support for the Tories but who are interested in meeting people with similar right-wing political-leanings?
    I can't answer the first part of your question as I'm not a member, and I'm not aware of any other right-wing societies. There's a list of societies here, although I'm not sure how up-to-date/complete it is:
    http://www.societies.cam.ac.uk
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    (Original post by FrankTeller1234)
    I can rub along perfectly well with with those on the Left who genuinely adhere to liberal principles. You will probably be aware, however, that in the last 5-10 years, certain factions of the Left have changed beyond all recognition and lost sight of what they used to stand for. Instead of advocating free speech, liberty and tolerance, they're harping on about privilege, cultural appropriation and oppression. And it's very difficult to get along with someone when they genuinely view people on the right of the political spectrum as legitimately evil. You also constantly feel as if if you are treading on egg-shells whilst speaking to them in an attempt not to say something that will spark a hysterical response from them. For some reason, these people tend to be disproportionately represented at university relative to the general population, too.



    Second part of post directed towards Chief Wiggum, Helenia or any other past/present Cambridge student with experience of this:

    As for the Conservative Association, is that a society *strictly* for students who support the Tories, vote for the Tories or have aspirations of one day being a member of the Tories? Or is it a general association for people interested in Conservatism as a political philosophy? If the former, are there any other societies at Cambridge for those who don't necessarily have unconditional support for the Tories but who are interested in meeting people with similar right-wing political-leanings?
    Apart from going on a (wildly unsuccessful) blind date with a CUCA member, I'm afraid I have very little idea of what goes on in their ranks. They have a website, which might be more informative. Like I said, left-leaning (though not a student any more) but mostly not very politically active!
 
 
 
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