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    (Original post by llys)
    There aren't "debilitating side effects". These people can live a normal life - they can even have children. It is the OPTIMAL solution when you look at it in terms of rehabilitation. I honestly don't know why you think it is so "outrageous". The alternative is to lock people up for life. Personally I think that is MUCH worse, and that is probably why some sex offenders do volunteer for medication.

    Please demonstrate how CBT has cured sex offenders. Some research or even just a few case studies would be nice.
    According to this article there are actually two broad types of medical treatment that can reduce reoffending. SSRIs which aren't at all medieval (but nonetheless you can't force them to take them) and anti-androgens, a form of chemical castration, which do have negative side-effects including breast growth, reduced bone density, increased risk of heart attacks and osteoporosis. I agree that should be an option for severe cases, but given the harsh side-effects it would definitely be medieval to force all offenders to undergo that, not to mention probably against their human rights.

    As for your second point, I didn't mean specifically CBT and I'm not going to accept a burden of proof as absurd as to refute the absurd notion that therapy has never worked.
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    (Original post by Da RainForest)
    Old news also I don't see the relevance of putting his school in the tread title. All paedophiles are the same, Etonian or not.
    It's not 'old' it has been reported in the last few days and I emphasised the fact that he was from Eton to a) emphasise the fact that pedos come in all walks of life and b) pre-empt the fact that money probably protected him.
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    The judicial system makes decisions in children's criminal cases based mainly on what is of benefit to the child and their development, rather than taking punitive measures. This is fairly unsurprising.
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    (Original post by Unkempt_One)
    According to this article there are actually two broad types of medical treatment that can reduce reoffending. SSRIs which aren't at all medieval (but nonetheless you can't force them to take them) and anti-androgens, a form of chemical castration, which do have negative side-effects including breast growth, reduced bone density, increased risk of heart attacks and osteoporosis. I agree that should be an option for severe cases, but given the harsh side-effects it would definitely be medieval to force all offenders to undergo that, not to mention probably against their human rights.

    As for your second point, I didn't mean specifically CBT and I'm not going to accept a burden of proof as absurd as to refute the absurd notion that therapy has never worked.
    I didn't claim it has never worked, but you can't even find a single case study where it has worked? Hmmm... that's actually quite damning, because I would have expected many people to try this approach.

    The negative side effects you mentioned do exist, but these changes also occur in normal ageing men who are not taking any medication (e.g. apparently the reported prevalence of gynecomastia is up to 70% in men 50–85 years of age). I would not call that "debilitating".

    For what it's worth, I would limit it to repeat offenders, because for isolated offences there can be an element of doubt on whether they are hormonally driven, and if they aren't then medication is obviously useless.
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    (Original post by llys)
    I didn't claim it has never worked, but you can't even find a single case study where it has worked? Hmmm... that's actually quite damning, because I would have expected many people to try this approach.

    The negative side effects you mentioned do exist, but these changes also occur in normal ageing men who are not taking any medication (e.g. apparently the reported prevalence of gynecomastia is up to 70% in men 50–85 years of age). I would not call that "debilitating".

    For what it's worth, I would limit it to repeat offenders, because for isolated offences there can be an element of doubt on whether they are hormonally driven, and if they aren't then medication is obviously useless.
    "I'm not going to accept a burden of proof" - read: "I'm not going to waste my time looking it up" because information on individual cases is difficult to find. Apparently evidence for the efficacy of CBT is 'mixed' and more evidence is needed, so we need to try it out on more people. Here are some studies: 1, 2, 3.

    I wouldn't call that debilitating either, but those are still significant side-effects that you can't forcibly inflict on someone.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    The judicial system makes decisions in children's criminal cases based mainly on what is of benefit to the child and their development, rather than taking punitive measures. This is fairly unsurprising.
    The problem is that childhood is a continuum in which children are gradually expected to assume more responsibility for their actions. However the juvenile justice system privileges those who take less responsibility for their actions; those whose parents deliberately infantilise them.



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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    The problem is that childhood is a continuum in which children are gradually expected to assume more responsibility for their actions. However the juvenile justice system privileges those who take less responsibility for their actions; those whose parents deliberately infantilise them.



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    Is that what's happened in this case though? Or isn't it just that the judge is overly influenced by the class background of the defendant?
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Is that what's happened in this case though? Or isn't it just that the judge is overly influenced by the class background of the defendant?
    by letting this schoolchild remain free Hizzonah has kept a cell available for someone who really needs it.
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    https://tompride.wordpress.com/2016/...phil-boeckman/

    May be of interest.
 
 
 
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