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    Im struggling with my exam technique in as level chemistry at the minute, so I was wondering if there are any tips to getting into the higher grades?
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    (Original post by miafrances19)
    Im struggling with my exam technique in as level chemistry at the minute, so I was wondering if there are any tips to getting into the higher grades?
    For most questions in chemistry, I like to:
    • Look at the question and figure out which area of chemistry it's testing me on. "The table shows the melting and boiling points of fuels..." Oh ok so it's testing me on crude oil, hydrocarbons, cracking, fuels, all that stuff. And then for each sub-question look at which element of that topic is it testing on.
    • Answer the question with the appropriate number of points, a point per mark. Write more if necessary, you can't get penalised. Ask yourself either "so what?" and "is that it?" at each point you write. "Explain why hexane has a higher boiling point that propane." Well that's because hexane has a longer hydrocarbon chain. So what? Well that makes it have a higher surface area than propane. So what? Well that means there are more van der waals forces. Is that it? Well there's more van der waals forces between the molecules so it will take more energy to break. So what? So the boiling point will be higher.
    • I also like to do this. I get the earliest relevant paper possible and don't do it. Instead I go through it with the specification. I locate the relevant topic the questions are asking on the spec and see what I'm expected to know. If I'm a little bit unsure I'll go check the markscheme. Periodicity of period 3 elements? Hmm what key words do I need to remember... shielding, electrostatic attraction, nuclear charge, etc. Thus when I go to the next exam paper, I'll have an idea of what answers I need to put down because exam papers like to reuse questions.
    Just realised you might be A2 so those examples may not be relevant xD
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    (Original post by RMNDK)
    For most questions in chemistry, I like to:
    • Look at the question and figure out which area of chemistry it's testing me on. "The table shows the melting and boiling points of fuels..." Oh ok so it's testing me on crude oil, hydrocarbons, cracking, fuels, all that stuff. And then for each sub-question look at which element of that topic is it testing on.
    • Answer the question with the appropriate number of points, a point per mark. Write more if necessary, you can't get penalised. Ask yourself either "so what?" and "is that it?" at each point you write. "Explain why hexane has a higher boiling point that propane." Well that's because hexane has a longer hydrocarbon chain. So what? Well that makes it have a higher surface area than propane. So what? Well that means there are more van der waals forces. Is that it? Well there's more van der waals forces between the molecules so it will take more energy to break. So what? So the boiling point will be higher.
    • I also like to do this. I get the earliest relevant paper possible and don't do it. Instead I go through it with the specification. I locate the relevant topic the questions are asking on the spec and see what I'm expected to know. If I'm a little bit unsure I'll go check the markscheme. Periodicity of period 3 elements? Hmm what key words do I need to remember... shielding, electrostatic attraction, nuclear charge, etc. Thus when I go to the next exam paper, I'll have an idea of what answers I need to put down because exam papers like to reuse questions.
    Just realised you might be A2 so those examples may not be relevant xD
    Thankyou so much this has helped loads!
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    The key to acing AS Chemistry relies on hard work and understanding, as well as plenty of past paper practice. Do not attempt to revise to memory, you need to be able to understand each and every concept in detail. Keep tackling questions everyday and do plenty of past papers. By doing so you naturally begin to understand what examiners are asking for. As well as this doing past papers will allow you to get definitions word perfect. Another key element for success at AS.
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    (Original post by miafrances19)
    Im struggling with my exam technique in as level chemistry at the minute, so I was wondering if there are any tips to getting into the higher grades?
    try to do past papers a lot of them each one 3 times that's what I did but you have to improve every time and mark them. this worked for me, I got 2 a*s it is guaranteed to work
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    Simple; hard work.


    If you're at a college/sixth form you are at a massive advantage as you have a lecturer/other students to bounce questions off - which is invaluable., If you are unsure about something no matter how stupid it may seem to you just ASK, never mind what the teacher/other people think. Also, actually put work in at home, do your homework/assignments and revise things you aren't sure about.

    The internet is teeming with learning resources so much so that as a private candidate I've managed to learn the entire syllabus in 3 months using the net and then textbooks to back up my learning. Machemguy, Tywin Lannister and E. Rintoul pretty much cover entire units with playlists - highly recommend them.

    PAST PAPERS (By far the best learning resource available) - AQA has every past paper from 2010 onwards available; so you can go through them and then use the mark scheme to mark your work (Being brutally honest - no "Oh well that *is* what i meant"; if your answer isn't on the scheme you don't get the mark), then you can take a highlighter and highlight any Q's you seem to keep getting wrong. Once you've established your weak point where you keep dropping marks you can then go off and start again on that topic & iron out any problems you are having. E.g. If I struggled on Ph/Buffer stuff I would then watch videos on it, work through my textbook and then go to A-levelchemistry.co.uk and go through the practice test's until I'm confident it's absorbed - then re-attempt Q's I struggled with.

    If people complain about their lack of progress yet still find time to party 3 days a week and watch television/browse Facebook for 2 hours a night they really ought to sort out their priorities.
 
 
 
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