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Mechanics question help: elastic collision of particles in 2D watch

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    Ok so I think I've got an answer for it.

    I was told that 2 particles collided.

    Particle A:
    mass = 10kg
    initial velocity = 500 m/s
    final(after collision) velocity = 300m/s
    Angle of 35degrees from original path after collision


    Particle B
    mass = 8kg
    no initial velocity is given, I assume it is 0.
    we need to workout the final velocity.


    However, as this is in 2 dimensions should my answer be 2 values? A value for the velocity of particle B in the Y direction and in the X direction?

    Also, to check I am on the right lines, I worked out the 2 velocities for B using the momentum equation, ie P=mv???
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    Ok so I think I've got an answer for it.

    I was told that 2 particles collided.

    Particle A:
    mass = 10kg
    initial velocity = 500 m/s
    final(after collision) velocity = 300m/s
    Angle of 35degrees from original path after collision


    Particle B
    mass = 8kg
    no initial velocity is given, I assume it is 0.
    we need to workout the final velocity.


    However, as this is in 2 dimensions should my answer be 2 values? A value for the velocity of particle B in the Y direction and in the X direction?

    Also, to check I am on the right lines, I worked out the 2 velocities for B using the momentum equation, ie P=mv???
    I would resolve everything into an x- and y-direction and then combine them to get a vector for your final answer, e.g. a final velocity of V m/s at theta degrees.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I would resolve everything into an x- and y-direction and then combine them to get a vector for your final answer, e.g. a final velocity of V m/s at theta degrees.
    OK, so just a quick question.

    A video I watched on it stated that the angle B (beta) would be larger than the angle \alpha because particle B is displaced more than particle A in the Y (-ve Y for that matter) direction. However the angle I calculated for B is considerable smaller than the angle of particle A after the collision.

    Also, in the text book I am using the angle B is smaller and under similar circumstances, A is heavier than B, B is at rest initially etc.

    And my P_{iy} isn't equal to P_{Fy}
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    (Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
    OK, so just a quick question.

    A video I watched on it stated that the angle B (beta) would be larger than the angle \alpha because particle B is displaced more than particle A in the Y (-ve Y for that matter) direction. However the angle I calculated for B is considerable smaller than the angle of particle A after the collision.

    Also, in the text book I am using the angle B is smaller and under similar circumstances, A is heavier than B, B is at rest initially etc.

    And my P_{iy} isn't equal to P_{Fy}
    It's been almost ten years since I have done collision type stuff so I'm not really sure.

    Have you drawn a diagram?
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    (Original post by Smack)
    It's been almost ten years since I have done collision type stuff so I'm not really sure.

    Have you drawn a diagram?
    Yeah. I can upload pics later.
 
 
 
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