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    I want to go into research and was wondering whether it is best to study Biomedical Science or Biochemistry in order to go into drugs for mental health research/ cancer research?
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    If i were you, if you are keen on the biosciences then pharmacology, biotechnology, bioinformatics are the fastest growing fields at the moment.

    Hope that helps.
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    It doesn't matter which of these you study. Both will give you a broad foundation in the subject to build on and specialise later.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    It doesn't matter which of these you study. Both will give you a broad foundation in the subject to build on and specialise later.
    Would it be better to study Biomedical Sciences rather than Pharmacology as Biomedical Sciences covers a wider area than just Pharmacology?
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    It makes no difference so choose what you're interested in most.
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    Pharmacology is generally a less saturated field career wise and future growth in the industry is steady. It also permits you to go into industry as well as academia. Industry is booming in pharma at the moment.
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    (Original post by Flimshaw)
    Pharmacology is generally a less saturated field career wise and future growth in the industry is steady. It also permits you to go into industry as well as academia. Industry is booming in pharma at the moment.
    Thank you for your help.

    I guess by industry you mean going into research whereas academia you are referring to the teaching side of the subject?
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    Hi there

    By Industry i mean a 9-5 job in pfeizer, baxter ect. involved in drug research and product development.By academia i mean PhD, Post Doc 90 hour weeks ect researching obscure mutations in mice for some random disease that yields no real benefits .From my experience, most PhD researchers i know wished they went into industry (if they could), so i am a bit biased towards the industry side of things. Standard these days is they require two years experience at minimum and a Masters or PhD.

    Hope that helps.
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    Ok, I am going to offer a different perspective here. First off, OP you can do any broad based subject you mentioned at undergrad level for a career in research. To get anywhere in either industry or academia you will need a masters if not a PHD. You are not going to get very far with just a BSc degree. Your interests will change and develop as you go along and gain experience and that will decide where you end up. Both industry and academia have their pros and cons and you will develop a preference for one or the other depending on you as a person, what you want out of your career and your circumstances. No one can predict what this will all look like when you are fully qualified so please go with what interests you now.

    Ps:- when I worked in industry I worked 9-5 on drug discovery projects that later got canned because they wouldn't make the company money. Working in academia I have flexible hours and am working on a clinical trial which already has an impact on the patients I work with. My point is that you cannot generalise one way or the other.


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    (Original post by Flimshaw)
    Hi there

    By Industry i mean a 9-5 job in pfeizer, baxter ect. involved in drug research and product development.By academia i mean PhD, Post Doc 90 hour weeks ect researching obscure mutations in mice for some random disease that yields no real benefits .From my experience, most PhD researchers i know wished they went into industry (if they could), so i am a bit biased towards the industry side of things. Standard these days is they require two years experience at minimum and a Masters or PhD.

    Hope that helps.
    ThermoFisher has positions open for Scientist III looking for PhDs w/ 0 years postdoc/industry experience

    As for undergrad degrees, supervisors don't really care as long as you demonstrate a significant degree of knowledge of your undergraduate course focus. I have labmates in cancer research from chemistry, food science, and biochem. Your undergrad degree is what you make of it.
 
 
 
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