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    Hello people,

    Throughout university I suffered with a crippling anxiety - shakes, sweating, physically sick. This happened everyday since I was a child.

    However, I'm finally free. No longer do I feel like this.

    I no longer procrastinate as much as I used to and feel optimistic about the future.

    If you are struggling with anxiety, please comment on here and I shall try and explain how I freed myself.

    Hakuna Matata!
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    Yeah, explain please.

    Sometimes i feel happy and other times i feel sad, its like this cycle occuring most of the time.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Yeah, explain please.

    Sometimes i feel happy and other times i feel sad, its like this cycle occuring most of the time.
    Hello,

    Why does this happen? Is it at university? Or is it something else specific?
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    (Original post by LeeMills77)
    Hello,

    Why does this happen? Is it at university? Or is it something else specific?
    No, i am a college student but it just still happens, the workload.
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    Are you selling something?

    If not, I'd love to hear how you freed yourself.
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    Alcohol is one helluva drug.
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    (Original post by LeeMills77)
    Hello people,

    Throughout university I suffered with a crippling anxiety - shakes, sweating, physically sick. This happened everyday since I was a child.

    However, I'm finally free. No longer do I feel like this.

    I no longer procrastinate as much as I used to and feel optimistic about the future.

    If you are struggling with anxiety, please comment on here and I shall try and explain how I freed myself.

    Hakuna Matata!
    Well done!!
    I need to get therapy for my social anxiety :/
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    (Original post by mscaffrey)
    Are you selling something?

    If not, I'd love to hear how you freed yourself.
    Honestly, I'm not selling anything. All I want to do is share my experience of how I freed myself from the crippling anxiety that severely affected my life.

    How has anxiety affected your life?
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    (Original post by LeeMills77)
    Hello people,

    Throughout university I suffered with a crippling anxiety - shakes, sweating, physically sick. This happened everyday since I was a child.

    However, I'm finally free. No longer do I feel like this.

    I no longer procrastinate as much as I used to and feel optimistic about the future.

    If you are struggling with anxiety, please comment on here and I shall try and explain how I freed myself.

    Hakuna Matata!
    I want to know. Explain. Me: graduated, got myself hooked on sedatives in the process, got a job, then quit, and finally, after going through all that effort, I snapped, now I have been stuck at home for many months, and I am on the verge of insanity.
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    Hello people,

    Firstly a bit of background:

    My anxiety started in childhood somewhere. I felt this crippling anxiety about attending an education institution. Shaking, sweating, feeling sick and whatever else.

    I'm now 34 and I'm almost free. It's taken around 20 years. I've seen countless therapists, counselors and psychiatrists. The last one I saw led me to fully understanding my condition.

    About a year ago I bought a journal and read everything I could get my hands on about the brain, anxiety, the amygdala and anxiety. Once I understood how the brain worked and how anxiety operated, anxiety no longer had the power to dominate my life.

    It works like this:

    When you feel anxiety, the amygdala thinks disaster follows straight after. In my situation, thinking of reading and writing sparked my anxiety into life and make me feel like I was going to die. So, to escape the anxiety I'd do whatever I could. This might be watching YouTube videos. ironing shirts or washing pots. I didn't realise but this was the worst thing I could have done. The amygdala realised that disaster didn't make an appearance and so thinks that YouTube videos, ironing shirts and washing pots kept me safe. So the next time I decided to study, the amygdala believed that by doing those activities again will keep me safe - which meant that the anxiety reaction is stronger than last time.

    The reality is that disaster doesn't follow anxiety. So the solution is to feel the anxiety and retrain it show that disaster doesn't make an appearance.

    I've been doing Mindfulness for about two years and I always did it when I wasn't studying. It didn't help a great deal because I didn't trigger the amygdala. For this change from anxiety to feeling fine, you must trigger the anxiety and feel it. Don't ignore it and don't try to push it away. This was difficult for me to do because it felt so powerful.

    For the past few months, I've thought about reading and writing and letting that anxiety flow through me. I used to tremble with fear when I was going to my university library. Now, I look at the library and feel that anxiety and go in and sit down. I sit there and feel that anxiety and after a few minutes my amygdala realises that disaster isn't making an appearance and there is nothing to fear. I can now attend the library free from anxiety.

    The man I must thank for this is David Carbonell. Here are some links to his work. His work has saved my life. I hope you read them and he helps you too.

    http://www.anxietycoach.com/anxietytrick.html

    http://www.anxietycoach.com/anxiety-help-blog.html

    Please let me know what you think. I was tricked for decades with my condition. Do you think you're being tricked too?
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    (Original post by LeeMills77)
    Hello people,

    Firstly a bit of background:

    My anxiety started in childhood somewhere. I felt this crippling anxiety about attending an education institution. Shaking, sweating, feeling sick and whatever else.

    I'm now 34 and I'm almost free. It's taken around 20 years. I've seen countless therapists, counselors and psychiatrists. The last one I saw led me to fully understanding my condition.

    About a year ago I bought a journal and read everything I could get my hands on about the brain, anxiety, the amygdala and anxiety. Once I understood how the brain worked and how anxiety operated, anxiety no longer had the power to dominate my life.

    It works like this:

    When you feel anxiety, the amygdala thinks disaster follows straight after. In my situation, thinking of reading and writing sparked my anxiety into life and make me feel like I was going to die. So, to escape the anxiety I'd do whatever I could. This might be watching YouTube videos. ironing shirts or washing pots. I didn't realise but this was the worst thing I could have done. The amygdala realised that disaster didn't make an appearance and so thinks that YouTube videos, ironing shirts and washing pots kept me safe. So the next time I decided to study, the amygdala believed that by doing those activities again will keep me safe - which meant that the anxiety reaction is stronger than last time.

    The reality is that disaster doesn't follow anxiety. So the solution is to feel the anxiety and retrain it show that disaster doesn't make an appearance.

    I've been doing Mindfulness for about two years and I always did it when I wasn't studying. It didn't help a great deal because I didn't trigger the amygdala. For this change from anxiety to feeling fine, you must trigger the anxiety and feel it. Don't ignore it and don't try to push it away. This was difficult for me to do because it felt so powerful.

    For the past few months, I've thought about reading and writing and letting that anxiety flow through me. I used to tremble with fear when I was going to my university library. Now, I look at the library and feel that anxiety and go in and sit down. I sit there and feel that anxiety and after a few minutes my amygdala realises that disaster isn't making an appearance and there is nothing to fear. I can now attend the library free from anxiety.

    The man I must thank for this is David Carbonell. Here are some links to his work. His work has saved my life. I hope you read them and he helps you too.

    http://www.anxietycoach.com/anxietytrick.html

    http://www.anxietycoach.com/anxiety-help-blog.html

    Please let me know what you think. I was tricked for decades with my condition. Do you think you're being tricked too?
    Well, it makes sense I guess. Do you think it will work on someone who's already dependent on sedating drugs?
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    (Original post by Ciel.)
    Well, it makes sense I guess. Do you think it will work on someone who's already dependent on sedating drugs?
    I'm guessing you take sedatives to block out the power of the amydgala? Personally, I've always been offered anti-depressants and all sorts of medication and I've turned them all down. I always felt they weren't needed. I think we all need to harness that power of the mind.

    I could be wrong about your situation but I'm guessing if you have anxiety over something you can retrain your amygdala to accept that disaster/danger/death won't make an appearance by understanding the Anxiety Trick? But again, I don't know you circumstance.
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    (Original post by LeeMills77)
    I'm guessing you take sedatives to block out the power of the amydgala? Personally, I've always been offered anti-depressants and all sorts of medication and I've turned them all down. I always felt they weren't needed. I think we all need to harness that power of the mind.

    I could be wrong about your situation but I'm guessing if you have anxiety over something you can retrain your amygdala to accept that disaster/danger/death won't make an appearance by understanding the Anxiety Trick? But again, I don't know you circumstance.
    For everything really, at this point. I'd only take it to uni at first but now, I just take it whenever I feel I'm getting stressed etc. which is almost everyday. I'm out of uni now but still randomly get anxiety, anything can trigger it I don't even know if it's fixable anymore. : / Might give it a try though, thanks for sharing your story.
 
 
 
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