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    (Original post by MintyMilk)
    You say that but the one with the capacitor discharge being used to calculate acceleration wasn't too bad. The principle was just basic suvat with generic experimental practices thrown in.
    That's true. My target now is to know every single past paper inside out... I don't know what else other than this I can do? :/
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    (Original post by particlestudent)
    That's true. My target now is to know every single past paper inside out... I don't know what else other than this I can do? :/
    Know the content so you can answer the questions rather than memorising the past papers
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    (Original post by samb1234)
    Know the content so you can answer the questions rather than memorising the past papers
    Well I know most the content that's why I moved onto past papers now . If I absolutely do not understand a question I revise the topic a bit more.

    My issue is also timing...
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    Can someone help out with this question? I feel like I'm missing out on something silly.
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    (Original post by rory58824)
    Can someone help out with this question? I feel like I'm missing out on something silly.
    You can do it by calculation, density is mass over volume so all we need to do is calculate the volume (as we're given the radius) and we can calculate the mass. The use g=GM/r2

    But intuitively one has twice the radius but half the density, and the other half the radius and double the density (of the other) so surely the masses of both will be the same, so g should be 13.4 - someone correct me if I'm wrong about that however
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    (Original post by TajwarC)
    You can do it by calculation, density is mass over volume so all we need to do is calculate the volume (as we're given the radius) and we can calculate the mass. The use g=GM/r2

    But intuitively one has twice the radius but half the density, and the other half the radius and double the density (of the other) so surely the masses of both will be the same, so g should be 13.4 - someone correct me if I'm wrong about that however
    Got it, completely forgot about V = 4/3 x pi x r^3 lol. Thanks
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    (Original post by particlestudent)
    I don't know what else other than this I can do? :/
    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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    Which paper do you guys think has been the hardest? (Excluding the infamous June 2015 paper).

    I would say the easiest (for me) has definitely been the June 2011 paper.
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    (Original post by particlestudent)
    Which paper do you guys think has been the hardest? (Excluding the infamous June 2015 paper).

    I would say the easiest (for me) has definitely been the June 2011 paper.
    Hardest = June 2016 without a doubt
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    (Original post by Questioner1234)
    Hardest = June 2016 without a doubt
    Let's hope not!
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    What do we think the QWC will be on, or what topics for the bulk of the written questions?
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    does anyone here know which old past papers would be relevant for phya4??
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    (Original post by Sopranos)
    What do we think the QWC will be on, or what topics for the bulk of the written questions?
    I think it will be on transformers this year or ac/dc generators. They haven't came up in quite some time .
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    http://prntscr.com/bb8rp9
    http://prntscr.com/bb8rw6

    Exact quote from the official textbook in reference to alpha radiation: "fixed range, depends on energy, can be up to 100mm"

    thanks, AQA...
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    (Original post by MintyMilk)
    http://prntscr.com/bb8rp9
    http://prntscr.com/bb8rw6

    Exact quote from the official textbook in reference to alpha radiation: "fixed range, depends on energy, can be up to 100mm"

    thanks, AQA...
    Lol, why do they do this :banghead:
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    (Original post by particlestudent)
    I think it will be on transformers this year or ac/dc generators. They haven't came up in quite some time .

    yh you might be right. what are the main points of ac dc generators?
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    For oscillation questions which point do you take the oscillations as starting from?

    Do they start from the maximum negative displacement?

    EDIT: Think it may be from maximum positive displacement actually? still not sure though...
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    I am trying to do 4(B)(ii) with no sucess (AQA textbook 3.3)

    4. An object oscillates in simple harmonic motion with an amplitude of 12mm and a time period of 0.27s. Calculate:
    a) its frequency
    f=1/T

f=1/0.27

f=3.7Hz
    b) its displacement and its direction of motion
    i) 0.10s,
    x=Acos(2 \pi ft)

x=0.012cos(2 \pi *3.7*0.1) 

=-8.2mm to the left
    ii) 0.20s after its displacement was +12mm
     ?

    Any help greatly appreciated!

    Textbook answers:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    a)3.7Hz
    b) i) -8.2mm towards maximum negative displacement

    ii) -0.7mm towards maximum positive displacement
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    (Original post by Music With Rocks)
    I am trying to do 4(B)(ii) with no sucess (AQA textbook 3.3)

    4. An object oscillates in simple harmonic motion with an amplitude of 12mm and a time period of 0.27s. Calculate:
    a) its frequency
    f=1/T

f=1/0.27

f=3.7Hz
    b) its displacement and its direction of motion
    i) 0.10s,
    x=Acos(2 \pi ft)

x=0.012cos(2 \pi *3.7*0.1) 

=-8.2mm to the left
    ii) 0.20s after its displacement was +12mm
     ?

    Any help greatly appreciated!

    Textbook answers:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    a)3.7Hz
    b) i) -8.2mm towards maximum negative displacement

    ii) -0.7mm towards maximum positive displacement

    This question is wierd lol. I used the displacement formula, with A and f being the same values as before. But for the t value I did 0.2/0.27 and subbed it into the equation and got -0.7mm.

    I did 0.2/0.27 to find how much of the cycle it had covered, if that makes sense, but i dont know if that is the correct reason for doing it.
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    (Original post by boyyo)
    This question is wierd lol. I used the displacement formula, with A and f being the same values as before. But for the t value I did 0.2/0.27 and subbed it into the equation and got -0.7mm.

    I did 0.2/0.27 to find how much of the cycle it had covered, if that makes sense, but i dont know if that is the correct reason for doing it.
    It kind of makes sense? haha I can't argue with the fact you got the right value

    But then why was part (i) not 0.1/0.27?

    I feel like the +12mm should make no difference seen as the oscillation starts from the right doesn't it, but I have no idea as you can tell
 
 
 
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