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    Also is it ok if you don't have a lot of coding experience?
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    I think Louisb19 can shed some light on this?
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    Only take it if you enjoy learning about networking just as much as you enjoy coding. AS will be harder if you don't have a lot of coding experience but it's not that hard to learn. To be honest other A-Levels like Further Maths and Physics are much more respected if you want to do a STEM degree (even computer science as it happens).
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    (Original post by Louisb19)
    Only take it if you enjoy learning about networking just as much as you enjoy coding. AS will be harder if you don't have a lot of coding experience but it's not that hard to learn. To be honest other A-Levels like Further Maths and Physics are much more respected if you want to do a STEM degree (even computer science as it happens).
    Would you recommend doing it if you're considering doing Computer Science at uni but you're unsure whether you'll like it? Or would it be better to take something like Further Maths and do online coding courses to see if you like it?
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    Honestly, people in my class who didn't take IT at GCSE can understand the content and get on with coding (in python but baby steps). If you aren't sure of being able to code, there are quite a few easy free ways to learn and even downloading python then screwing around in it can help. Make sure not to neglect every other aspect of the computer science course for coding. Remember that your knowledge of understanding general codes (or pseudocode) and the way data is stored and interpreted as well as input output systems as well as hardware and software is also in the exam.

    Hope I helped.
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    (Original post by Ara8311a)
    Would you recommend doing it if you're considering doing Computer Science at uni but you're unsure whether you'll like it? Or would it be better to take something like Further Maths and do online coding courses to see if you like it?
    If you would like to study Computer science at a top university then you have to do Further Maths. All of my friends who want to study Computer Science have said that none of their uni offers even mention Computing A-Level :/

    I personally recommend that you take Further Maths and then maybe learn a good language like java in your own time.
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    (Original post by Louisb19)
    Only take it if you enjoy learning about networking just as much as you enjoy coding. AS will be harder if you don't have a lot of coding experience but it's not that hard to learn. To be honest other A-Levels like Further Maths and Physics are much more respected if you want to do a STEM degree (even computer science as it happens).
    What is the reason behind this apart from luddism, lack of understanding of the A Level course by university admissions tutors, or in the case of computer science wanting students with a 'clean' mind on a level footing because computer science (and its predecessor computing) are uncommon subjects due to not many colleges offering them?

    A few years ago there was some fuss over university law departments not wanting applicants with an A Level in Law. The most common reason was that they wanted students to start on a level footing with a 'clean' mind in the subject. Students with an A Level in Law could have a unfair advantage in some modules, especially criminal law.

    If A Level Computer Science is not respected by universities or employers in the same way as other science subjects are then it raises serious questions whether recent initiatives to install computer science and coding into the primary and secondary school curriculum is a waste of time and government money.

    There was an attempt to install electronics into the secondary school curriculum as a GCSE during the 1980s as a modern alternative to the old fashioned woodwork and metalwork but it proved to be less than successful for many reasons including universities and employers not valuing the subject - or even being aware that it exists at all - and inertia in society that technology subjects were for students who were not academic but good with their hands to succeed at something. I fear that computer science could go down a similar avenue to electronics in schools. It computer science becomes less than successful then questions will arise whether it is possible to add an extra subject to the school curriculum that is both mainstream and valued.

    I have an A Level in Computing but there have been many changes to the course when it was replaced with Computer Science, so my own experiences of the subject will have limited relevance today.
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    What is the reason behind this apart from luddism, lack of understanding of the A Level course by university admissions tutors, or in the case of computer science wanting students with a 'clean' mind on a level footing because computer science (and its predecessor computing) are uncommon subjects due to not many colleges offering them?

    A few years ago there was some fuss over university law departments not wanting applicants with an A Level in Law. The most common reason was that they wanted students to start on a level footing with a 'clean' mind in the subject. Students with an A Level in Law could have a unfair advantage in some modules, especially criminal law.

    If A Level Computer Science is not respected by universities or employers in the same way as other science subjects are then it raises serious questions whether recent initiatives to install computer science and coding into the primary and secondary school curriculum is a waste of time and government money.

    There was an attempt to install electronics into the secondary school curriculum as a GCSE during the 1980s as a modern alternative to the old fashioned woodwork and metalwork but it proved to be less than successful for many reasons including universities and employers not valuing the subject - or even being aware that it exists at all - and inertia in society that technology subjects were for students who were not academic but good with their hands to succeed at something. I fear that computer science could go down a similar avenue to electronics in schools. It computer science becomes less than successful then questions will arise whether it is possible to add an extra subject to the school curriculum that is both mainstream and valued.

    I have an A Level in Computing but there have been many changes to the course when it was replaced with Computer Science, so my own experiences of the subject will have limited relevance today.
    I'm not sure if you are asking me, but I can maybe give some insight.

    Computer science A-Level is not hard. All it comes down to is memorising the textbook and proceeding to get 100%. Anyone can do well in the programming project since there is so much overwhelming support and sites like stackoverflow which allow you to solve any problem you may have. For the people who want to study CompSci at uni it is not hard to ace the A-Level now adays.

    I don't study it at university but I would assume that some of the skill required to be a successful computer science student (at university) would not be the things taught in Computing A-Level. Further Maths and Physics teach more applicable skills to the course.

    Also Computing isn't offered everywhere so it's not really fair to make it a requirement.
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    (Original post by Louisb19)
    If you would like to study Computer science at a top university then you have to do Further Maths. All of my friends who want to study Computer Science have said that none of their uni offers even mention Computing A-Level :/

    I personally recommend that you take Further Maths and then maybe learn a good language like java in your own time.
    I didn't realise that. I knew that Further Maths was recommended at Oxford but I didn't realise you didn't need computing.

    Thank you!
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    I am currently in Year 12 studying Maths, Further Maths and the new A levels of Computer Science and Physics. My experience of Computer Science A Level isn't the best, but that's due to the poor teaching and the department in my school and not because of the course itself. Computer Science is a lot more interesting in terms of content than the pervious Computing or ICT courses. If you want an idea of what the course entails, look up 'craigndave' on YouTube who have made videos of the whole new AS course which might give you a good idea.
    I don't think you have to be a coding genius to do the course. The only real programming you have to do is the programming project in A2 which is 20% of the grade and most of the marks for that if for the report of the project, not nescessarily the code itself. You do need to be quite good at understanding and writing algorithms in the second paper. There are some model papers of this on the OCR website. If you do D1 in Maths, then it covers most of the algorithms you need to know by heart for the Computer Science course.
    I would definitely recommend that if you want to do something STEM related you do Further Maths if you can. I do think though with Computer Science is that it has a bit of a stigma about it being esay and pointless. Although you don't need Computer Science A Level to do it at university, the course has changed a lot and the focus is more computational thinking based so you have to take advice from others with a pinch of salt. I really hope this helps!
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    (Original post by Aria Enoshima)
    Honestly, people in my class who didn't take IT at GCSE can understand the content and get on with coding (in python but baby steps). If you aren't sure of being able to code, there are quite a few easy free ways to learn and even downloading python then screwing around in it can help. Make sure not to neglect every other aspect of the computer science course for coding. Remember that your knowledge of understanding general codes (or pseudocode) and the way data is stored and interpreted as well as input output systems as well as hardware and software is also in the exam.

    Hope I helped.
    Thanks, so is a lot of the course theory based as well as the coding?
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    (Original post by FabulouslyAwks)
    Thanks, so is a lot of the course theory based as well as the coding?
    Yeah, there is alot of theory in CompSci. I have a few examples of some presentations that I've done in class if you want some examples of topics.
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    (Original post by olivia7799)
    I am currently in Year 12 studying Maths, Further Maths and the new A levels of Computer Science and Physics. My experience of Computer Science A Level isn't the best, but that's due to the poor teaching and the department in my school and not because of the course itself. Computer Science is a lot more interesting in terms of content than the pervious Computing or ICT courses. If you want an idea of what the course entails, look up 'craigndave' on YouTube who have made videos of the whole new AS course which might give you a good idea.
    I don't think you have to be a coding genius to do the course. The only real programming you have to do is the programming project in A2 which is 20% of the grade and most of the marks for that if for the report of the project, not nescessarily the code itself. You do need to be quite good at understanding and writing algorithms in the second paper. There are some model papers of this on the OCR website. If you do D1 in Maths, then it covers most of the algorithms you need to know by heart for the Computer Science course.
    I would definitely recommend that if you want to do something STEM related you do Further Maths if you can. I do think though with Computer Science is that it has a bit of a stigma about it being esay and pointless. Although you don't need Computer Science A Level to do it at university, the course has changed a lot and the focus is more computational thinking based so you have to take advice from others with a pinch of salt. I really hope this helps!
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Louisb19)
    Only take it if you enjoy learning about networking just as much as you enjoy coding. AS will be harder if you don't have a lot of coding experience but it's not that hard to learn. To be honest other A-Levels like Further Maths and Physics are much more respected if you want to do a STEM degree (even computer science as it happens).
    Thanks would you necessarily need physics along with further Maths to do computer science at uni, or is further Maths a level enough?
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    (Original post by Aria Enoshima)
    Yeah, there is alot of theory in CompSci. I have a few examples of some presentations that I've done in class if you want some examples of topics.
    Yes please thanks also what kind of coding projects do you have to do?
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    (Original post by FabulouslyAwks)
    Thanks would you necessarily need physics along with further Maths to do computer science at uni, or is further Maths a level enough?
    If you were thinking purely about uni applications I would go for.

    Maths
    Further Maths
    Physics
    Optional 4th choice (if you are a super wiz kid): Computer Science / Economics (or something easy)
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    (Original post by Louisb19)
    If you were thinking purely about uni applications I would go for.

    Maths
    Further Maths
    Physics
    Optional 4th choice (if you are a super wiz kid): Computer Science / Economics (or something easy)
    Thanks again, unfortunately I am not a super whiz kid, but with a levels like the first 3 I think you would need something a little easier!
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    (Original post by FabulouslyAwks)
    Thanks again, unfortunately I am not a super whiz kid, but with a levels like the first 3 I think you would need something a little easier!
    I do Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Computing and it is honestly not that bad. I'm not sure if unis care much about your 4th A-Level though.
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    (Original post by Louisb19)
    I do Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Computing and it is honestly not that bad. I'm not sure if unis care much about your 4th A-Level though.
    ok that's good
    I am definitely choosing Maths and further Maths (though the further Maths gcse for me is like :nooo:, but I will get through, hopefully)
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    (Original post by Louisb19)
    Computer science A-Level is not hard. All it comes down to is memorising the textbook and proceeding to get 100%. Anyone can do well in the programming project since there is so much overwhelming support and sites like stackoverflow which allow you to solve any problem you may have. For the people who want to study CompSci at uni it is not hard to ace the A-Level now adays.
    I have not had time to check out the new Computer Science A Level in detail so I'm unable to comment on it's finer details and whether it is a significant improvement over the old Computing A Level. I can understand why the old Computing A Level was not highly rated by universities because many aspects of the course were dated with the 1970s and 80s look and feel to them; there was a bias towards business data processing; and certain topics including mobile apps, multimedia, industrial computing, and open source software were not covered.


    I don't study it at university but I would assume that some of the skill required to be a successful computer science student (at university) would not be the things taught in Computing A-Level. Further Maths and Physics teach more applicable skills to the course.
    How relevant is Further Mathematics A Level to computer science in higher education and the real world? My impression is that computer science is based on discrete mathematics rather than continuous mathematics and anything other than the most basic calculus is rarely useful. There are the D1 and D2 papers in the mathematics A Level which partially addresses the historic lack of discrete mathematics at A Level but their availability in colleges is not universal and I'm unsure how valued they are by universities.

    Why would physics be more respected over electronics at A Level apart from it being a more established Russell Group subject?

    Also Computing isn't offered everywhere so it's not really fair to make it a requirement.
    This starts to become a catch 22 situation. Colleges will be reluctant to offer the subject if it isn't valued by universities and industry, and universities and industry will not value the subject if it is not offered by many colleges.

    I am wondering if overseas students have any effect on how universities value qualifications. If a certain qualification is related to a degree course but rarely available outside of Britain then universities might not highly rate it because it could put overseas students at a disadvantage over home students who have the qualification.
 
 
 
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