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    (Original post by Arran90)
    I have not had time to check out the new Computer Science A Level in detail so I'm unable to comment on it's finer details and whether it is a significant improvement over the old Computing A Level. I can understand why the old Computing A Level was not highly rated by universities because many aspects of the course were dated with the 1970s and 80s look and feel to them; there was a bias towards business data processing; and certain topics including mobile apps, multimedia, industrial computing, and open source software were not covered.




    How relevant is Further Mathematics A Level to computer science in higher education and the real world? My impression is that computer science is based on discrete mathematics rather than continuous mathematics and anything other than the most basic calculus is rarely useful. There are the D1 and D2 papers in the mathematics A Level which partially addresses the historic lack of discrete mathematics at A Level but their availability in colleges is not universal and I'm unsure how valued they are by universities.

    Why would physics be more respected over electronics at A Level apart from it being a more established Russell Group subject?



    This starts to become a catch 22 situation. Colleges will be reluctant to offer the subject if it isn't valued by universities and industry, and universities and industry will not value the subject if it is not offered by many colleges.

    I am wondering if overseas students have any effect on how universities value qualifications. If a certain qualification is related to a degree course but rarely available outside of Britain then universities might not highly rate it because it could put overseas students at a disadvantage over home students who have the qualification.
    That was kind of my point. Computing A-Level teaches you content relevent to Computer Science but since this will be covered again in University lectures it is not really that important. There is vertically no discrete maths in Computing A-Level and apart from a little programming it doesn't really teach problem solving unfortunately (which is key). Since this is a major aspect of Maths I can see why admission tutors think value Maths significantly more.

    One of my friends was told that they could not accept him due to him not taking further maths even though his reason for not taking it was because he wanted to take computing and they clashed on the school timetable.
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    (Original post by Louisb19)
    That was kind of my point. Computing A-Level teaches you content relevent to Computer Science but since this will be covered again in University lectures it is not really that important. There is vertically no discrete maths in Computing A-Level and apart from a little programming it doesn't really teach problem solving unfortunately (which is key). Since this is a major aspect of Maths I can see why admission tutors think value Maths significantly more.
    Are you referring to the old Computing A Level or the new Computer Science A Level which has replaced it? They are technically different subjects.

    If what you are saying that content in the A Level is covered again at university then surely this will make certain parts of the degree course easier which is anything but a disadvantage. This goes back to what I said about students starting the degree course on a level footing.
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    (Original post by olivia7799)
    I am currently in Year 12 studying Maths, Further Maths and the new A levels of Computer Science and Physics. My experience of Computer Science A Level isn't the best, but that's due to the poor teaching and the department in my school and not because of the course itself. Computer Science is a lot more interesting in terms of content than the pervious Computing or ICT courses. If you want an idea of what the course entails, look up 'craigndave' on YouTube who have made videos of the whole new AS course which might give you a good idea.
    I don't think you have to be a coding genius to do the course. The only real programming you have to do is the programming project in A2 which is 20% of the grade and most of the marks for that if for the report of the project, not nescessarily the code itself. You do need to be quite good at understanding and writing algorithms in the second paper. There are some model papers of this on the OCR website. If you do D1 in Maths, then it covers most of the algorithms you need to know by heart for the Computer Science course.
    I would definitely recommend that if you want to do something STEM related you do Further Maths if you can. I do think though with Computer Science is that it has a bit of a stigma about it being esay and pointless. Although you don't need Computer Science A Level to do it at university, the course has changed a lot and the focus is more computational thinking based so you have to take advice from others with a pinch of salt. I really hope this helps!

    But like what fields could you work in with an A level in computer science and/or ICT
 
 
 
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