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    Apologies if this is in the wrong forum or if this sort of post is not allowed, I couldn't see anything barring it.

    I'm currently in the middle of my training year and doing my PGCE, and I've got two interviews in the coming week. I was wondering if I could get some advice about which school seems like the best place to do my NQT year.

    School #1 is a high-attaining grammar school (that I went to as a student), and is very close to where I live (walking distance). The position would have me only teaching my specialist subject in science beyond KS3 and I do really enjoy teaching higher ability pupils. As I only recently left, the staff taught me when I was there, and while I don't think it's an issue, I'm not completely sure as obviously I've never been in that situation before.

    School #2 is a comprehensive mixed school that's further, so I'd have to learn how to drive and get a car (former more difficult than the latter for me), and it was also my first placement school. I'd be expected to teach all 3 sciences until KS5, with a focus on my specialism and Chemistry, which I am fine with, Physics is the one I find somewhat challenging. I was thinking of opting for the former school but I recently went to drinks with the staff of school #2 and it made me realise how much I missed the place.

    My real question is this: will I be walking into great difficulty with doing my NQT at a grammar school? Obviously I've not been offered anything yet, but I want to have a better sense of what my priorities are before the interviews in case I do get both job offers.

    Any advice I would be very grateful for, apologies if I haven't provided enough information or if this wasn't appropriate to post.
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    (Original post by tomb_silver)
    Apologies if this is in the wrong forum or if this sort of post is not allowed, I couldn't see anything barring it.

    I'm currently in the middle of my training year and doing my PGCE, and I've got two interviews in the coming week. I was wondering if I could get some advice about which school seems like the best place to do my NQT year.

    School #1 is a high-attaining grammar school (that I went to as a student), and is very close to where I live (walking distance). The position would have me only teaching my specialist subject in science beyond KS3 and I do really enjoy teaching higher ability pupils. As I only recently left, the staff taught me when I was there, and while I don't think it's an issue, I'm not completely sure as obviously I've never been in that situation before.

    School #2 is a comprehensive mixed school that's further, so I'd have to learn how to drive and get a car (former more difficult than the latter for me), and it was also my first placement school. I'd be expected to teach all 3 sciences until KS5, with a focus on my specialism and Chemistry, which I am fine with, Physics is the one I find somewhat challenging. I was thinking of opting for the former school but I recently went to drinks with the staff of school #2 and it made me realise how much I missed the place.

    My real question is this: will I be walking into great difficulty with doing my NQT at a grammar school? Obviously I've not been offered anything yet, but I want to have a better sense of what my priorities are before the interviews in case I do get both job offers.

    Any advice I would be very grateful for, apologies if I haven't provided enough information or if this wasn't appropriate to post.
    There's nothing inappropriate in your post, and welcome to TSR. As for your question, it seems a no-brainer to someone from the outside. Go for the grammar school. You haven't given any negatives to it, compared with the second school. As a science teacher, you aren't going to face may difficulties getting a job in the future and you'll have proven your abilities to deal with the subject at a higher level in this school, so you will have that in your favour. Having worked alongside former pupils of the school I was teaching in, I can say your status as an old boy/girl is very soon forgotten, even by those who taught you as a pupil, once you get on with the daily job, so don't let that trouble you.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    There's nothing inappropriate in your post, and welcome to TSR. As for your question, it seems a no-brainer to someone from the outside. Go for the grammar school. You haven't given any negatives to it, compared with the second school. As a science teacher, you aren't going to face may difficulties getting a job in the future and you'll have proven your abilities to deal with the subject at a higher level in this school, so you will have that in your favour. Having worked alongside former pupils of the school I was teaching in, I can say your status as an old boy/girl is very soon forgotten, even by those who taught you as a pupil, once you get on with the daily job, so don't let that trouble you.
    Thank you for the reply, and for the welcome!

    So there is no negative for going for a grammar school over a comprehensive? Sorry, I'm a bit overwhelmed at the prospect of this week deciding how my whole year is going to go, and I want to be absolutely sure I've made the right decision! If it is ultimately just down to my preference, then I've got some thinking to do this weekend!
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    (Original post by tomb_silver)
    Thank you for the reply, and for the welcome!

    So there is no negative for going for a grammar school over a comprehensive? Sorry, I'm a bit overwhelmed at the prospect of this week deciding how my whole year is going to go, and I want to be absolutely sure I've made the right decision! If it is ultimately just down to my preference, then I've got some thinking to do this weekend!
    There are some schools who might take the view that teaching at a comp has shown you can handle all abilities and behaviour, whilst others will take it as a sign that you are intellectually competent in your subject if you work in a grammar. It's swings and roundabouts. However, as a science teacher, you are going to find that they will take anyone with a pulse in most places, so pick whichever one you feel you want to work in.
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    (Original post by tomb_silver)
    Thank you for the reply, and for the welcome!

    So there is no negative for going for a grammar school over a comprehensive? Sorry, I'm a bit overwhelmed at the prospect of this week deciding how my whole year is going to go, and I want to be absolutely sure I've made the right decision! If it is ultimately just down to my preference, then I've got some thinking to do this weekend!
    Personaly I prefer inner city schools in challenging contexts. At the end of the day its what YOU want that matters.
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    Also is the grammar private? If so perhaps not a great move as it can make going back into state more difficult.
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    (Original post by earthworm)
    Also is the grammar private? If so perhaps not a great move as it can make going back into state more difficult.
    Thank you for the reply, it's not private! I had heard that issue before, but thank you. I think I'm going to go to both interviews and try to get them to let me make my decision after the second one (assuming I get offered anything).

    I'm quite split at the moment, I know what I'd be getting with the comp so I'm going to give the grammar a really good look!
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    (Original post by tomb_silver)
    Thank you for the reply, it's not private! I had heard that issue before, but thank you. I think I'm going to go to both interviews and try to get them to let me make my decision after the second one (assuming I get offered anything).

    I'm quite split at the moment, I know what I'd be getting with the comp so I'm going to give the grammar a really good look!
    You will be expected to say on the day whether you would accept the job or not. The etiquette in teaching interviews is quite arcane but essential to follow.
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    Is it an actual grammar school (i.e. where an 11+ is required for entry)? Many schools have still kept 'grammar school' in the name despite not actually being so and can end up being as comprehensive as any other school. Either way though, it does slightly sound like you've already made your mind up. I imagine working with teachers who taught you could be... interesting.
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    thanks for all the advice, I ended up going with the comprehensive, from the interview it just felt a lot more like I'd be happy there!
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    (Original post by tomb_silver)
    thanks for all the advice, I ended up going with the comprehensive, from the interview it just felt a lot more like I'd be happy there!
    Glad to hear you got the job!
 
 
 
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