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This is disgusting, can the meat industry ever be humane? Watch

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    I'm surprised only the Mail reported on this. I couldn't even watch the video.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...like-dead.html

    I admittedly eat meat but make sure it is free range and sourced specifically. I stay away from the likes of KFC and subway so I try my best. But I rarely have it nowadays anyway.

    But is there any chance of the meat industry reforming? Surely there is ways to process all this humanely? Are there any laws in the process of being introduced?
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    i like bacon and chicken and steak omonononmonomon
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    It's more humane than what happens to chickens living in the wild.
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    (Original post by Jamie S)
    i like bacon and chicken and steak omonononmonomon
    mature
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    Probably not, as the need for more cheap food increases along with population we're probably going to see worse treatment if anything.
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    It's more humane than what happens to chickens living in the wild.
    Not really though
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    (Original post by Prince_fancybum)
    Not really though
    Really? Because if I had to choose between getting thrown around a bit or getting hunted down by a fox and slowly torn to bits, I'd choose the former.
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    Really? Because if I had to choose between getting thrown around a bit or getting hunted down by a fox and slowly torn to bits, I'd choose the former.
    Battery chicken: spends whole life being force fed in tiny cage unable to move, with no natural light. Killed by decapitation.

    Wild chicken: varied and drug free food, plenty of space to move, lots of natural light. May be killed by a predator, but will almost definitely live longer than the few weeks a farmed chicken would
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    Not a chance, not anytime soon and never will be until the the meat market isn't so ruthlessly driven by profit margins and protected by governments.
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    After seeing this thread, I decided to double up on the pepperoni on my Domino's pizza :borat:
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    That video made my mouth water.

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    Let's be serious. Any normative ethical question concerning animals depends on one's views of the extent of moral importance which can be afforded to them. There are all sorts of good arguments. Personally, I cannot see animals as morally important, though I could be convinced otherwise (and if I were, I would feel it correct to become vegetarian, if not vegan) (n.b. I doubt that anyone on here could convince me). If you do see animals as morally important and yet eat meat, I suggest you seriously question your views and make sure you're able to articulate a moral basis for your decisions.
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    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    Let's be serious. Any normative ethical question concerning animals depends on one's views of the extent of moral importance which can be afforded to them. There are all sorts of good arguments. Personally, I cannot see animals as morally important, though I could be convinced otherwise (and if I were, I would feel it correct to become vegetarian, if not vegan) (n.b. I doubt that anyone on here could convince me). If you do see animals as morally important and yet eat meat, I suggest you seriously question your views and make sure you're able to articulate a moral basis for your decisions.
    The question as i see it is how the importance of the well being of the animal weighs against potential gain from eating it.

    In the western world, the gain of consumption is purely one of convenience, as its just simply easier to have a balanced and pleasurable diet when eating meat.

    Meanwhile, the animals themselves have varying degrees of awareness of the situation they are in (depending on the animal) but are certainly able to feel displeasure from it (less so with chickens).

    Now, unless you place an arbitrary line around mankind, it makes sense that uneccisary harm of any form of life that can experience it is immoral, based on the degree to which it can ecperience it.

    Now, i personally place the prevention of the suffering of an animal as more important than the convenience of a person. Partially because i see the prevention of suffering as more important than the promotion of pleasure.
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    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    Let's be serious. Any normative ethical question concerning animals depends on one's views of the extent of moral importance which can be afforded to them. There are all sorts of good arguments. Personally, I cannot see animals as morally important, though I could be convinced otherwise (and if I were, I would feel it correct to become vegetarian, if not vegan) (n.b. I doubt that anyone on here could convince me). If you do see animals as morally important and yet eat meat, I suggest you seriously question your views and make sure you're able to articulate a moral basis for your decisions.
    I'm interested to know why you don't see animals as morally important. If moral behaviour is behaviour that attempts to avoid causing unnecessary suffering, then participation in the meat industry is in contradiction with it. So, if moral behaviour is in fact not dependant on the intention to avoid causing unnecessary suffering, then what is it and why bother with it?
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    (Original post by miser)
    I'm interested to know why you don't see animals as morally important. If moral behaviour is behaviour that attempts to avoid causing unnecessary suffering, then participation in the meat industry is in contradiction with it. So, if moral behaviour is in fact not dependant on the intention to avoid causing unnecessary suffering, then what is it and why bother with it?
    Morality is a calculus which dictates behaviour based on what is best for the class of beings deemed morally important. It is silly to decide first what the content of morality is, and then the beings to which morality applies. Unless, of course, you define the class of beings as 'those capable of experiencing suffering', but that needs justifying - it's very far from being able to be taken as obvious.

    Edit: the reason I don't take animals as morally important is because I start from the assumption that something isn't morally important until proven otherwise, and I find humans to be morally important because I feel intuitively that some humans are morally important, and I can't find a rational distinction between those humans and any other human.
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    As far as I know, cattle isn't being waterboarded. You could make the argument for foie gras I suppose, but killing is killing, no humane way to do it.
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    (Original post by Zargabaath)
    mature
    No, fresh. However I like mature Cheddar.
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    Please watch cowspiracy on Netflix or YouTube, I guarantee it will change your life, and oh and btw free range doesn't mean ****. Please if you do watch it get back to me, I'd like to discuss it!!!
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    As far as I'm aware, the welfare standards in America are far far less than that in the UK.

    In America they cut the trachea out of the cow and let it suffocate/drown in it's own blood, whereas here we stun it.

    I don't understand why the chicks can't be raised for meat though? I'm not sure why they don't do that instead of just crushing them to death.
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    Not really.

    No offense but I was expecting to see something bloody or gruesome. I just saw was chicks in cages. Those were pretty mild pictures for "inhumane" actions.
 
 
 
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