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    Ello folks, whilst there has been many threads on the topic before, I'd like to hear some more recent opinions. I've decided that I'd like to study Primary Education at university. I've worked as a volunteer at my local primary school since I was 16 (I'm 18 now) and I've really enjoyed the experience. However, there is only one male member of staff out of 20 or so at the school and that makes me very wary.

    There's a few questions that I have, and it would be nice to hear the responses of any males who are training to become teachers, or are currently working as one in a school (although the opinions of anyone would be greatly appreciated);

    Will I feel like an 'outsider' during female-dominated lectures?

    Are you seen as 'odd' by fellow students for wanting to enter such a stereo-typically female profession?

    Is it a myth that male teaching graduates tend to be more successful in job applications due to primary schools wishing to make up for the lack of male staff?

    How are male Primary Teachers perceived by their female colleagues and parents?

    Are male teachers expected to progress to managerial positions, as opposed to teaching in the classroom? C

    Cheers guys.
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    Pretty sure there's loads of guys in this FB group who are doing primary - or the girls in there will be able to ally your concerns.

    (https://www.facebook.com/groups/559570350888011/)

    It's a group for 16/17 teacher trainee's
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    On my course, out of 90-something students, there were 13 male trainees. A couple have dropped out for various reasons and so there are now 11. No-one is treated as an outsider. The university runs a club for male trainees and has tried to ensure that male trainees have at least one male mentor at some point during the course too so there is formal support from the university.

    How you're treated in schools will obviously depend on the school - I haven't heard about anyone being treated badly by a school or parent for being male, but presumably there are some places where it does happen. I would like to think it's quite rare, though.

    I do think it's a myth that male teachers find it easier to get jobs. Good schools want the best staff out there and, if that's a female candidate, the female candidate will get the job. Older male teachers who are still teaching full-time are even rarer than male teachers so I think there is something in the belief that male teachers will eventually move up to managerial positions whether that's because of expectations or because those positions are better paid etc is arguable. I doubt anyone is forced to give up teaching full time for a managerial position, though.
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    Hi, Ive been doing a placement at a primary where there are no male teachers (it is quite a small school mind). Everyone has treated me really and you soon forget it after a couple of days.
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    You will be knee deep, mate.

    You will experience the advantages of being a male in certain circumstances, such as working at a school in a deprived area. Many kids will grow up with a different number to the standard one in regards to how many dads they have in their lives. A positive male role model is often lacking, and so being kind, considerate, educated, as well as free from tattoos and the stench of cigarettes and alcohol will hold you in good stead. I'm guessing you still have all your original teeth.

    If you surround yourself with females at university, you will be more likely to actually get work done, as opposed to fraternising with the lads and their top bantz. You may graduate with a first in banterology, but you would not have made the most of what you are actually supposed to do in university, which is learn and experience the subject matter.
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    In my tutor group of 13 at uni, there's 4 lads and I'd say that's pretty typical of the course as a whole. You'll definitely be way outnumbered, but it depends on your personality of that means you'll feel like an outsider.

    All the guys in my tutor group seem to be loving the course though and don't seem phased to be the only men in some schools.

    I've not heard anyone express negative opinions of male trainee teachers. I definitely thin they have an advantage when it comes to applying to jobs- not enough to make it unfair or anything, but with two equal candidates on paper the male has an edge. Plenty of heads are male as well, so definitely wouldn't think a male teacher was weird or anything.

    The only negative I could think of is that most make teachers I've seen have ended up teaching in Upper ks2. You could almost certainly find a job elsewhere, but I think there's definitely a stereotype of assuming male teachers are most effective in the older years.
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    Thank you all for your responses! I think I've made my mind up, and will hopefully apply to study Primary Education this September for 2017 entry.

    (Original post by Findlay6)
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    (Original post by Pierson)
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    (Original post by skeptical_john)
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    (Original post by TheRealDarthVader)
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    (Original post by JoannaMilano)
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