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A Level choice for law including electronics and computer science Watch

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    Was the foreign language a deciding factor in being admitted or not? It's also noticeable that all subjects are Russell Group whereas my friend in interested in taking two STEM subjects that are not Russell Group subjects.
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    The Electronics A Level covers the subject to a broader and deeper level than the electronics part of physics A Level does although it does not include electromagnetics. Have you completed any A Levels or are you just currently studying them?

    Economics is not a Russell Group subject.

    Are you trying to imply that a person only has rounded intelligence if they hold at least one essay type A Level subject and at least one mathematical or numerate type A Level subject? My findings are that around 70% of A Level students fall into either a mathematics, science, and technology camp or an arts and humanities camp with only economics, geography, music, and foreign languages commonly being studied by people in both camps.
    No, I'm not commenting on anyones intelligence just that a bigger variety of subjects shows more rounded intelligence that's all. A mix of both technology and essay a levels would just shows unis that you are capable of doing all aspects of a law degree although I'm sure you can get in without a mix. Also why does it matter that economics is not a Russell group subject?
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    A friend is considering a career in law and proposes to study A Levels in Mathematics, Computer Science, Electronics, and Law. His subject choice is based around his interests and that he wants to be an expert in hi-tech crime and computer related law.

    However, he has been advised not to take this combination because three of the A Levels are not Russell Group although IMO they are academically rigorous and relevant subjects. He is of the opinion that too many lawyers are technically illiterate and Britain needs more lawyers with a technical background to face the challenges of the 21st century. A Levels in English literature or history (both Russell Group subjects) might be fine for lawyers specialising in family law or property law but they are irrelevant for lawyers specialising in hi-tech crime and computer related law.

    What do you think? Are university law departments compromising the quality of future lawyers by being too snobby with A Level subjects that they don't understand or are not Russell Group?
    what is 'russell group' subjects? Its a group of unis. You mean facilitating subjects?
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    (Original post by Compost)
    I know 3 people who are currently studying Law at (variously) Cambridge, Nottingham and Bristol. They studied:

    Maths, Further Maths, Physics, Chemistry and German
    Maths, Further Maths, Physics and French
    Maths, Physics, Chemistry and French.

    It is not necessary to study English or History, nor even to do a classic essay subject.
    OK, perhaps I exaggerated slightly. Merely the vast majority of successful law applicants will have an essay subject (not necessarily English or History). In any case, I think the fact remains that Maths, Computer Science, Electronics, Law is not a strong A-level combination for Law, and the idea that choosing the first three of those subjects will put you in a strong position to specialise in computer law is very misguided.
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    (Original post by DotDotDot...)
    Also why does it matter that economics is not a Russell group subject?
    Because electronics and computer science are not Russell Group subjects.

    (Original post by sweeneyrod)
    I think the fact remains that Maths, Computer Science, Electronics, Law is not a strong A-level combination for Law
    Why is that?

    1. Utility. They are not essay type subjects and an essay type subject is strongly recommended.

    2. Snobbery. They are not Russell Group subjects so will be looked down on regardless of their academic rigour.


    3. Unfamiliarity. Admissions tutors are unlikely to be familiar with these subjects so applicants are effectively unknown quantities and difficult to determine how suitable they are for a law degree.

    and the idea that choosing the first three of those subjects will put you in a strong position to specialise in computer law is very misguided.
    Certainly better than an A Level in English literature or Latin will. In the past five years we have had barristers in computer crime cases asking the question "what's a website?". It really is that bad.
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    In the past five years we have had barristers in computer crime cases asking the question "what's a website?". It really is that bad.
    e
    The purpose of a barrister isn't to fully understand the technical details of a case, but to handle the legal aspects. Otherwise there would be one type of lawyer to settle disputes between farmers, one type for disputes between plumbers, one type for cases involving bridges, one type for cases regarding libraries etc. Instead, experts on the relevant matters are used. Doing a computer science degree puts you in an excellent position to become one of these experts (a very good career path in my opinion).

    However, once you've done a law degree, your A-levels are irrelevant. Having done A-level electronics four years ago won't make you a technical expert, so it is pointless to choose it based on the idea that it will let you become a specialised technical lawyer.
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    (Original post by sweeneyrod)
    The purpose of a barrister isn't to fully understand the technical details of a case, but to handle the legal aspects.
    Nobody expects a barrister to be an expert in the finer details of technical matters but questions like "what's a website?" really is a pisstake in this day and age.

    However, once you've done a law degree, your A-levels are irrelevant. Having done A-level electronics four years ago won't make you a technical expert, so it is pointless to choose it based on the idea that it will let you become a specialised technical lawyer.
    He will still have the knowledge of the subject and it provides a base on which to expand into topics which will make him a specialised technical lawyer.

    A criticism I have of education in Britain is that hardly anybody studies anything for the knowledge any more. All that matters to most people is a piece of paper with a grade on it.
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    A friend is considering a career in law and proposes to study A Levels in Mathematics, Computer Science, Electronics, and Law. His subject choice is based around his interests and that he wants to be an expert in hi-tech crime and computer related law.

    However, he has been advised not to take this combination because three of the A Levels are not Russell Group although IMO they are academically rigorous and relevant subjects. He is of the opinion that too many lawyers are technically illiterate and Britain needs more lawyers with a technical background to face the challenges of the 21st century. A Levels in English literature or history (both Russell Group subjects) might be fine for lawyers specialising in family law or property law but they are irrelevant for lawyers specialising in hi-tech crime and computer related law.

    What do you think? Are university law departments compromising the quality of future lawyers by being too snobby with A Level subjects that they don't understand or are not Russell Group?
    I don't think the issue is whether or not he's doing 'Russell Group' subject, it's more that he should really consider doing an essay subject. I think English Literature at least should be studied for someone wanting to do law. Or even History. Law A Level won't really help or give a good foundation into a Law degree as I've heard it's a looot different.
    Tbh even if he wants to specialise in hi tech crime he still needs to pass the compolsury modules which will (as well as hi-tech crime) require essay writing.
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    (Original post by tcameron)
    Law A Level won't really help or give a good foundation into a Law degree as I've heard it's a looot different.
    If an A Level in law is of marginal benefit or does not provide a good foundation for a law degree then why does TSR have a subforum for this subject but doesn't have a subforum for A Levels in electronics or computer science? Is it simply because law is a popular A Level, whereas electronics and computer science aren't, but the majority of people who take it are gullible fools who think it's a good subject when it isn't?
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    (Original post by Arran90)
    If an A Level in law is of marginal benefit or does not provide a good foundation for a law degree then why does TSR have a subforum for this subject but doesn't have a subforum for A Levels in electronics or computer science? Is it simply because law is a popular A Level, whereas electronics and computer science aren't, but the majority of people who take it are gullible fools who think it's a good subject when it isn't?
    From the people I know who took law a level then did at decree level, it was not helpful and is recommended not to take as lecturers usually have to undo some of the things a level law students have learnt.
    Just my opinion from what I've heard. The other a levels I think are fine but instead of law consider an essay subject.
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    Having to unlearn stuff from the law A Level during the degree course was a problem a few years ago but the course has been updated following the A Level reforms. Has there been any significant criticism of the reformed course by universities?

    There is another issue of universities wanting students with a 'clean' mind when it comes to knowledge of law and on a level footing in the subject with students who haven't got an A Level in Law.
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    When Science Doesn't Meet the Law

    New Law Journal, 10th July 2008

    http://www.newlawjournal.co.uk/nlj/c...oesnt-meet-law

    Yet, lawyers can avoid any scientific training throughout their education and professional development and this appears the norm.
    The perceived “scientific illiteracy” among the public could be seen to extend its reach into the legal profession. This is not surprising when looking at the scientific education of law students, most of whom have not studied any scientific discipline post-16. By way of example, of the 214 students given an unconditional offer to study the LLB at Leeds in 2007, just 39 (18.3%) had at least one science A-level. The traditional law degree then dilates this educational lacuna by failing to introduce law students to basic scientific concepts, or provide even a rudimentary grounding in the work of forensic scientists.
    The House of Commons Science and Technology Select Committee in their 2005 report—Forensic Science on Trial—claimed that: “it is of great concern that there is currently no mandatory training for lawyers in this area” and that there had been “repeated calls for better training of judges and the legal profession”.
    So much for lawyers studying bedtime stories at A Level...
 
 
 
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