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    What is the name for CH3CH2CH(CH3)CH3 and how do you work it out? What do the brackets mean? Thank you!
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    (Original post by JustmeStuDYING)
    What is the name for CH3CH2CH(CH3)CH3 and how do you work it out? What do the brackets mean? Thank you!
    You read the carbons from one side to the other. At each carbon you ensure that there are a total of four bonds. If you see a bracket it means that a group of atoms is attached to a carbon in the chain.

    Counting from the right hand side there is an unbroken chain of four carbons. That means that the name is based on butane.

    There is a methyl group on the second carbon in the chain so the name becomes 2-methylbutane.

    BUT a careful consideration of the places that a methyl group COULD go reveals that they will always have the name 2-methylbutane.

    So, the locant is redundant.

    Name = methylbutane
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    (Original post by JustmeStuDYING)
    What is the name for CH3CH2CH(CH3)CH3 and how do you work it out? What do the brackets mean? Thank you!
    2-methyl butane! The brackets basically mean that that CH3 group is attached to the CH group. Since the longest chain has 4 carbons, the molecule is butane and since the alkyl group (the CH3) is attached to the second carbon (always the smaller number! It wouldn't be the 4th carbon), its called 2-methyl butane all together.
    Try drawing it out!


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    (Original post by yungiq)
    2-methyl butane! The brackets basically mean that that CH3 group is attached to the CH group. Since the longest chain has 4 carbons, the molecule is butane and since the alkyl group (the CH3) is attached to the second carbon (always the smaller number! It wouldn't be the 4th carbon), its called 2-methyl butane all together.
    Try drawing it out!


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    Nope, Charco's right. Can you see any structural isomers also called methylbutane? 3-methylbutane is the same, and 1- or 4-methylbutane are propane so there's no need for the number as there's no ambiguity!

    (You wouldn't lose marks for including it though)

    Edit: Sorry, ignore me! I thought you were correcting Charco for some reason... Technically you don't need the number but don't worry about including it!
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    (Original post by KombatWombat)
    Nope, Charco's right. Can you see any structural isomers also called methylbutane? 3-methylbutane is the same, and 1- or 4-methylbutane are propane so there's no need for the number as there's no ambiguity!

    (You wouldn't lose marks for including it though)

    Edit: Sorry, ignore me! I thought you were correcting Charco for some reason... Technically you don't need the number but don't worry about including it!
    Whoops.
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    (Original post by Pigster)
    Whoops.
    They start with the same letter, basically the same thing
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    (Original post by charco)
    You read the carbons from one side to the other. At each carbon you ensure that there are a total of four bonds. If you see a bracket it means that a group of atoms is attached to a carbon in the chain.

    Counting from the right hand side there is an unbroken chain of four carbons. That means that the name is based on butane.

    There is a methyl group on the second carbon in the chain so the name becomes 2-methylbutane.

    BUT a careful consideration of the places that a methyl group COULD go reveals that they will always have the name 2-methylbutane.

    So, the locant is redundant.

    Name = methylbutane
    Thank you so much this really helped
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    (Original post by yungiq)
    2-methyl butane! The brackets basically mean that that CH3 group is attached to the CH group. Since the longest chain has 4 carbons, the molecule is butane and since the alkyl group (the CH3) is attached to the second carbon (always the smaller number! It wouldn't be the 4th carbon), its called 2-methyl butane all together.
    Try drawing it out!


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    I understand it now thank you!
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    (Original post by KombatWombat)
    They start with the same letter, basically the same thing
    Ahh okay thank you
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    (Original post by KombatWombat)
    They start with the same letter, basically the same thing
    Thanks
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