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Re-studying Physics after a 6 year hiatus watch

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    After leaving school 6 years ago with a B in GCSE in Physics, I want to study it at A Level after dropping out of college now that I've decided to want to pursue a degree in Physics.

    After not studying any Physics whatsoever for 6 years by knowledge has dried up a bit, so what is the best way to refresh my knowledge back to a level at which I would have been going to college with, without retaking an entire GCSE?
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    (Original post by BradPennick)
    After leaving school 6 years ago with a B in GCSE in Physics, I want to study it at A Level after dropping out of college now that I've decided to want to pursue a degree in Physics.

    After not studying any Physics whatsoever for 6 years by knowledge has dried up a bit, so what is the best way to refresh my knowledge back to a level at which I would have been going to college with, without retaking an entire GCSE?
    I am in this exact situation. Though I'm 25 so have been out of education longer, didn't go to uni.

    I just got hold of a level revision book and took the plunge. I use YouTube videos as you can pause and rewind until it clicks. I visited the essential mathematics sections of mentioned revision books to jog my memory.

    It's tough at first glance, but once you get going a lot of it is fairly easy.

    I'm applying to study physics with a foundation year at uni.

    Ignore the pop science books for now, they are for those that need an ego massage, you are not learning any real physics reading those books.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    I use YouTube videos as you can pause and rewind until it clicks.
    I hadn't thought of Youtube videos (I never do for things like this), so I might have to look in to that!

    It'll probably be the case that once I get moving I'll remember the other stuff but right now things like Quadratic Equations just seem like hieroglyphs to me!
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    (Original post by BradPennick)
    I hadn't thought of Youtube videos (I never do for things like this), so I might have to look in to that!

    It'll probably be the case that once I get moving I'll remember the other stuff but right now things like Quadratic Equations just seem like hieroglyphs to me!
    You can fill in the maths gaps as you go along. Like I had never heard of the quadratic formula until I came across it in a solution for a projectile motion question. I then just googled it. Tr hardest part is learning confidence in what you've taught yourself, if that makes sense?
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    (Original post by BradPennick)
    I hadn't thought of Youtube videos (I never do for things like this), so I might have to look in to that!

    It'll probably be the case that once I get moving I'll remember the other stuff but right now things like Quadratic Equations just seem like hieroglyphs to me!
    DoctorPhysicsA is a decent channel for A Level physics, although the videos are a bit on the long side.

    The quadratic equations stuff is fairly easy with a bit of practice.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    You can fill in the maths gaps as you go along. Like I had never heard of the quadratic formula until I came across it in a solution for a projectile motion question. I then just googled it. Tr hardest part is learning confidence in what you've taught yourself, if that makes sense?
    I see what you mean, but since I'll be getting a Maths A Level at the same time I'll be refreshing my knowledge on that at the same time to bring myself up to speed. Same goes for Chemistry.

    (Original post by Hydeman)
    DoctorPhysicsA is a decent channel for A Level physics, although the videos are a bit on the long side.

    The quadratic equations stuff is fairly easy with a bit of practice.
    I'll have to have a look at that!
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    DoctorPhysicsA is a decent channel for A Level physics, although the videos are a bit on the long side.

    The quadratic equations stuff is fairly easy with a bit of practice.
    I was literally just coming back to this thread to mention Dr Physics A....whom I also really fancy. He just sounds so kind.
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    (Original post by BradPennick)
    I see what you mean, but since I'll be getting a Maths A Level at the same time I'll be refreshing my knowledge on that at the same time to bring myself up to speed. Same goes for Chemistry.



    I'll have to have a look at that!
    So you are taking physics, maths and chemistry a level all at once? Within what time frame?
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    I was literally just coming back to this thread to mention Dr Physics A....whom I also really fancy. He just sounds so kind.
    Doh! BradPennick, the channel is DrPhysicsA, not DoctorPhysicsA. My memory fails me.

    Yeah, I agree that he's a very good teacher.
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    I would generally advise against this.

    Physics is a subject that offers careers only to the top few percent of degree holders. With B at GCSE, it is unlikely you would continue in physics past degree level, and if not, difficult to see why do a physics degree rather than something more directly marketable, like engineering or computer science.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    I would generally advise against this.

    Physics is a subject that offers careers only to the top few percent of degree holders. With B at GCSE, it is unlikely you would continue in physics past degree level, and if not, difficult to see why do a physics degree rather than something more directly marketable, like engineering or computer science.
    If my grade at GCSE affects my ability to study a Masters and/or PhD then I will retake my GCSE at which point to attain the necessary grade, but with the likes of Durham, if I can get an A*A*A for their entry requirements I'm sure a B in GCSE would not have an affect on things. I have no intention of studying a degree just so I can get a job out of it. Physics, and specifically Astronomy and Astrophysics, is a love, and a passion of mine, and something I want to make a life out of.

    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Doh! BradPennick, the channel is DrPhysicsA, not DoctorPhysicsA. My memory fails me.

    Yeah, I agree that he's a very good teacher.
    I'll definitely have to have a look at him
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    I would generally advise against this.

    Physics is a subject that offers careers only to the top few percent of degree holders. With B at GCSE, it is unlikely you would continue in physics past degree level, and if not, difficult to see why do a physics degree rather than something more directly marketable, like engineering or computer science.
    Depends on what he wants to do with the degree, he may also, like me, have work experience and connections that will make his case a little different to the average grad.

    But I do agree that engineering and computer science from a top uni would be more marketable.
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    (Original post by BradPennick)
    After leaving school 6 years ago with a B in GCSE in Physics, I want to study it at A Level after dropping out of college now that I've decided to want to pursue a degree in Physics.

    After not studying any Physics whatsoever for 6 years by knowledge has dried up a bit, so what is the best way to refresh my knowledge back to a level at which I would have been going to college with, without retaking an entire GCSE?
    Hi I'm doing physics a-level at the moment and you seem to be continuing the same subjects as me and I thought these websites will help

    Physics, Maths Chemistry etc - http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/

    Maths - http://www.examsolutions.net/

    Chemistry youtube videos :
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPt...25YHw5SPGdPz0g

    I hope this helps I'm currently stuck on a physics question but no one has answered me yet and I saw this so I thought I might help you out :P Good Luck
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Doh! BradPennick, the channel is DrPhysicsA, not DoctorPhysicsA. My memory fails me.

    Yeah, I agree that he's a very good teacher.
    This is a good website

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/hframe.html
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    (Original post by BradPennick)
    If my grade at GCSE affects my ability to study a Masters and/or PhD then I will retake my GCSE at which point to attain the necessary grade, but with the likes of Durham, if I can get an A*A*A for their entry requirements I'm sure a B in GCSE would not have an affect on things. I have no intention of studying a degree just so I can get a job out of it. Physics, and specifically Astronomy and Astrophysics, is a love, and a passion of mine, and something I want to make a life out of.
    You misunderstand. The grade does not matter; your aptitude matters. If the grade does not fairly represent your aptitude, then perhaps this is a reasonable plan. It is important that you be able to get a job in astrophysics if you want to spend your life doing astrophysics, unless you are independently wealthy.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    You misunderstand. The grade does not matter; your aptitude matters. If the grade does not fairly represent your aptitude, then perhaps this is a reasonable plan. It is important that you be able to get a job in astrophysics if you want to spend your life doing astrophysics, unless you are independently wealthy.
    Surely with an A* or A in Mathematics at A Level a GCSE grade of B wouldn't have an effect?
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    (Original post by BradPennick)
    Surely with an A* or A in Mathematics at A Level a GCSE grade of B wouldn't have an effect?
    It's not about who sees that B at GCSE, it's as Observatory said, your ability. If your B was you dossing around then no, it's not a problem.
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    (Original post by BradPennick)
    Surely with an A* or A in Mathematics at A Level a GCSE grade of B wouldn't have an effect?
    If you have an A* in mathematics A level then I wouldn't think twice about B in physics GCSE. But my reading of your OP led me to believe you don't have any A levels.

    By all means try to get an A* in A level mathematics and physics - this risks very little money and relatively little time - but if it doesn't work out, and don't be totally surprised if it doesn't, it might not be the best idea to pursue it to the end of the earth.

    btw, for interest, and because it's not made clear even to those much later in the process than you, getting a job in physics requires going through a series of filters roughly as follows:

    - At the top universities, about 50% want to do a PhD, and about 25% are able to. All of these students have AAA+ at A level, most first time, many with only A*s in any maths and science related subjects. I don't know how it is at lower ranked universities.

    - Of those 25%, about 25% continue to become post-docs. A post-doc is a limited, usually two or three year contract. The rest leave physics.

    - After at least two post-docs, you may receive a permanent job. About 25% of those who go on to be post-docs succeed getting a permanent job.

    So from an initial population of students with all top grades in mathematical subjects who want to be physicists, the "survival rate" to being able to do physics as a profession is about 3%, excluding those who chose to do other things after the bachelor's degree.
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    (Original post by BradPennick)
    Surely with an A* or A in Mathematics at A Level a GCSE grade of B wouldn't have an effect?
    Hi I hope you saw the links I sent earlier they are helpful and I'm also reading the messages on this thread and my teachers did say that when applying to University of course they would look at a-levels because a lot of people starting studying better then etc so your GCSE won't have an effect however universities like Oxford etc still probably look at GCSE's to see how smart the student is generally. However again I think that is stupid as a lot of people improve when they do a-levels so I wouldn't worry about it.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    It's not about who sees that B at GCSE, it's as Observatory said, your ability. If your B was you dossing around then no, it's not a problem.
    Ah I'm with you. Sorry Observatory, I thought you were being funny! It was. I was immature when I was at school, so I didn't have the focus to try hard because I didn't fully grasp the effect it'd have on my future! I was always good at Maths, and always picked it up pretty easily, but I never put the work in.
 
 
 
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